Advanced search
1 file | 108.63 KB Add to list

Biotransformation of metal(loid)s by intestinal microorganisms

(2010) PURE AND APPLIED CHEMISTRY. 82(2). p.409-427
Author
Organization
Abstract
Many metals and metalloids undergo complex biotransformation processes by microorganisms in the environment, namely, Ge, As, Se, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi, and Po. Though the human intestine harbors a highly diverse and metabolically active microbial community, the knowledge on metal(loid) biotransformation by gut microbiota is limited. Microbial metal(loid) metabolism in the gut is highly relevant when assessing health risks from oral exposure, as both the bioavailability and the toxicity of the ingested compound can be modulated. This review gathers and compares a broad selection of scientific studies on the intestinal biotransformation of metal(loid)s. It can be inferred that metal(loid) biotransformation by intestinal microbiota is a common process, resulting in both beneficial and adverse toxicological effects. Whereas for Hg the intestinal demethylation of methylmercury results in enhanced elimination, highly bioavailable and toxic arsenic and Bi species are formed by intestinal microorganisms. In either case, we conclude that the gut microbial potency should be considered to be taken up in toxicokinetic studies and models for assessing the health risks of oral metal(loid) exposure. This will allow the relevance of intestinal metal(loid) biotransformation to be assessed for human health risks.
Keywords
colon microflora, biomethylation, metals, metalloids, risk assessment, speciation, thiolation, volatilization, SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA, METHYL MERCURY-CHLORIDE, IN-VITRO, DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID, MICROBIAL ECOSYSTEM, ARSENIC BIOAVAILABILITY, METHYLMERCURIC CHLORIDE, GASTROINTESTINAL FLORA, CONTAMINATED SOILS, URINARY-EXCRETION

Downloads

  • DiazBone 2010 PAC 82 2 409.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 108.63 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Diaz-Bone, Roland A, and Tom Van de Wiele. “Biotransformation of Metal(loid)s by Intestinal Microorganisms.” PURE AND APPLIED CHEMISTRY 82.2 (2010): 409–427. Print.
APA
Diaz-Bone, R. A., & Van de Wiele, T. (2010). Biotransformation of metal(loid)s by intestinal microorganisms. PURE AND APPLIED CHEMISTRY, 82(2), 409–427. Presented at the 3rd International symposium on Trace Elements in Food (TEF-3).
Chicago author-date
Diaz-Bone, Roland A, and Tom Van de Wiele. 2010. “Biotransformation of Metal(loid)s by Intestinal Microorganisms.” Pure and Applied Chemistry 82 (2): 409–427.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Diaz-Bone, Roland A, and Tom Van de Wiele. 2010. “Biotransformation of Metal(loid)s by Intestinal Microorganisms.” Pure and Applied Chemistry 82 (2): 409–427.
Vancouver
1.
Diaz-Bone RA, Van de Wiele T. Biotransformation of metal(loid)s by intestinal microorganisms. PURE AND APPLIED CHEMISTRY. 2010;82(2):409–27.
IEEE
[1]
R. A. Diaz-Bone and T. Van de Wiele, “Biotransformation of metal(loid)s by intestinal microorganisms,” PURE AND APPLIED CHEMISTRY, vol. 82, no. 2, pp. 409–427, 2010.
@article{1086677,
  abstract     = {{Many metals and metalloids undergo complex biotransformation processes by microorganisms in the environment, namely, Ge, As, Se, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Te, Hg, Tl, Pb, Bi, and Po. Though the human intestine harbors a highly diverse and metabolically active microbial community, the knowledge on metal(loid) biotransformation by gut microbiota is limited. Microbial metal(loid) metabolism in the gut is highly relevant when assessing health risks from oral exposure, as both the bioavailability and the toxicity of the ingested compound can be modulated. This review gathers and compares a broad selection of scientific studies on the intestinal biotransformation of metal(loid)s.
It can be inferred that metal(loid) biotransformation by intestinal microbiota is a common process, resulting in both beneficial and adverse toxicological effects. Whereas for Hg the intestinal demethylation of methylmercury results in enhanced elimination, highly bioavailable and toxic arsenic and Bi species are formed by intestinal microorganisms. In either case, we conclude that the gut microbial potency should be considered to be taken up in toxicokinetic studies and models for assessing the health risks of oral metal(loid) exposure. This will allow the relevance of intestinal metal(loid) biotransformation to be assessed for human health risks.}},
  author       = {{Diaz-Bone, Roland A and Van de Wiele, Tom}},
  issn         = {{0033-4545}},
  journal      = {{PURE AND APPLIED CHEMISTRY}},
  keywords     = {{colon microflora,biomethylation,metals,metalloids,risk assessment,speciation,thiolation,volatilization,SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA,METHYL MERCURY-CHLORIDE,IN-VITRO,DIMETHYLARSINIC ACID,MICROBIAL ECOSYSTEM,ARSENIC BIOAVAILABILITY,METHYLMERCURIC CHLORIDE,GASTROINTESTINAL FLORA,CONTAMINATED SOILS,URINARY-EXCRETION}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  location     = {{Rome, Italy}},
  number       = {{2}},
  pages        = {{409--427}},
  title        = {{Biotransformation of metal(loid)s by intestinal microorganisms}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1351/PAC-CON-09-06-08}},
  volume       = {{82}},
  year         = {{2010}},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: