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The origin of herbicide-resistant Chenopodium album L.: analysis of genetic variation and population structure

Jonas Aper UGent, Jan De Riek, Els Mechant UGent, Benny De Cauwer UGent, Robert Bulcke UGent and Dirk Reheul UGent (2010) WEED RESEARCH. 50(3). p.235-244
abstract
Chenopodium album is a predominantly self-fertilising weed species common in temperate regions of the world that has developed resistance to photosystem II inhibitors. The genetic variation and population structure of eight populations from North West Europe were investigated using 416 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. The populations were checked for their level of herbicide resistance by pot experiments and the investigated plants were genotyped for the Ser(264) to Gly mutation by cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence. Five populations were sampled in sugar beet, one population from a maize monoculture served as a triazine-resistant reference and the two other populations were susceptible reference populations. Nei's gene diversity within populations for the whole dataset was low (0.073), whereas, the differentiation among populations was significant ((ST) = 0.26, amova, P < 0.001). There was no correlation between geographical and genetic distance of population pairs. The allelic richness (estimated by 'band richness' and percentage of polymorphic loci) was lowest in the two populations with a complete set of herbicide-resistant plants and in one population with a mixture of herbicide-resistant and -susceptible plants, giving evidence for a historical bottleneck. However, the loss in genetic variation was not that large, indicating that herbicide-resistant populations may maintain their adaptive capacity. Furthermore, this study shows that different techniques can be used to extract information from AFLP markers for the investigation of the genetic background of weed populations. Knowledge about the origin and spread of herbicide-resistant weed populations may give opportunities to manage the resistance problem, with its associated ecological and economic consequences.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
CANADIAN WEEDS, AFLP MARKERS, TRIAZINE-RESISTANT, photosystem II inhibitors, AFLP, amplified fragment length polymorphism, fat-hen, herbicide resistance, genetic diversity, SUGAR-BEET, DIVERSITY, SPREAD, BOTTLENECKS, BIOTYPES, RANGE, TESTS
journal title
WEED RESEARCH
Weed Res.
volume
50
issue
3
pages
235 - 244
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000277420100006
JCR category
AGRONOMY
JCR impact factor
1.622 (2010)
JCR rank
20/74 (2010)
JCR quartile
2 (2010)
ISSN
0043-1737
DOI
10.1111/j.1365-3180.2010.00777.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
981686
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-981686
date created
2010-06-21 10:51:27
date last changed
2010-09-13 10:55:38
@article{981686,
  abstract     = {Chenopodium album is a predominantly self-fertilising weed species common in temperate regions of the world that has developed resistance to photosystem II inhibitors. The genetic variation and population structure of eight populations from North West Europe were investigated using 416 amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers. The populations were checked for their level of herbicide resistance by pot experiments and the investigated plants were genotyped for the Ser(264) to Gly mutation by cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence. Five populations were sampled in sugar beet, one population from a maize monoculture served as a triazine-resistant reference and the two other populations were susceptible reference populations. Nei's gene diversity within populations for the whole dataset was low (0.073), whereas, the differentiation among populations was significant ((ST) = 0.26, amova, P {\textlangle} 0.001). There was no correlation between geographical and genetic distance of population pairs. The allelic richness (estimated by 'band richness' and percentage of polymorphic loci) was lowest in the two populations with a complete set of herbicide-resistant plants and in one population with a mixture of herbicide-resistant and -susceptible plants, giving evidence for a historical bottleneck. However, the loss in genetic variation was not that large, indicating that herbicide-resistant populations may maintain their adaptive capacity. Furthermore, this study shows that different techniques can be used to extract information from AFLP markers for the investigation of the genetic background of weed populations. Knowledge about the origin and spread of herbicide-resistant weed populations may give opportunities to manage the resistance problem, with its associated ecological and economic consequences.},
  author       = {Aper, Jonas and De Riek, Jan and Mechant, Els and De Cauwer, Benny and Bulcke, Robert and Reheul, Dirk},
  issn         = {0043-1737},
  journal      = {WEED RESEARCH},
  keyword      = {CANADIAN WEEDS,AFLP MARKERS,TRIAZINE-RESISTANT,photosystem II inhibitors,AFLP,amplified fragment length polymorphism,fat-hen,herbicide resistance,genetic diversity,SUGAR-BEET,DIVERSITY,SPREAD,BOTTLENECKS,BIOTYPES,RANGE,TESTS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {235--244},
  title        = {The origin of herbicide-resistant Chenopodium album L.: analysis of genetic variation and population structure},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3180.2010.00777.x},
  volume       = {50},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Aper, Jonas, Jan De Riek, Els Mechant, Benny De Cauwer, Robert Bulcke, and Dirk Reheul. 2010. “The Origin of Herbicide-resistant Chenopodium Album L.: Analysis of Genetic Variation and Population Structure.” Weed Research 50 (3): 235–244.
APA
Aper, J., De Riek, J., Mechant, E., De Cauwer, B., Bulcke, R., & Reheul, D. (2010). The origin of herbicide-resistant Chenopodium album L.: analysis of genetic variation and population structure. WEED RESEARCH, 50(3), 235–244.
Vancouver
1.
Aper J, De Riek J, Mechant E, De Cauwer B, Bulcke R, Reheul D. The origin of herbicide-resistant Chenopodium album L.: analysis of genetic variation and population structure. WEED RESEARCH. 2010;50(3):235–44.
MLA
Aper, Jonas, Jan De Riek, Els Mechant, et al. “The Origin of Herbicide-resistant Chenopodium Album L.: Analysis of Genetic Variation and Population Structure.” WEED RESEARCH 50.3 (2010): 235–244. Print.