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Folates and folic acid: from fundamental research toward sustainable health

Dieter Blancquaert UGent, Serguei Storojenko UGent, Karen Loizeau, Hans De Steur UGent, Veerle De Brouwer UGent, Jacques Viaene UGent, Stéphane Ravanel, Fabrice Rébeillé, Willy Lambert UGent and Dominique Van Der Straeten UGent (2010) CRITICAL REVIEWS IN PLANT SCIENCES. 29(1). p.14-35
abstract
Folates are of paramount importance in one-carbon metabolism of most organisms. Plants and microorganisms are able to synthesize folates de novo, making them the main dietary source for humans and animals, which are dependent on food or feed supplies for folates. Folate deficiency is an increasing problem in the developing, as well as in the developed regions of the world, affecting millions of people. Different strategies, such as food fortification and folic acid supplementation, remain far from accessible for the poor rural populations in developing countries. Increasing knowledge concerning folate biosynthesis, transport and catabolism does not only deepen our insight on the regulation of folate metabolism but also provides the keys towards folate enhancement through metabolic engineering in bacteria, as well as in plants. Recently, promising results were obtained using such an approach, but further fundamental research is a prerequisite to develop a practicable solution to fight folate deficiency. In parallel, progress in the development and improvement of folate analysis has been made. Here, we provide the state-of-the-art of folate biosynthesis, catabolism, and salvage. Finally, we report on progress in folate biofortification and discuss the agroeconomical aspect of biofortified crop plants.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
NEURAL-TUBE DEFECTS, CELL-FREE EXTRACTS, GUANOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE CYCLOHYDROLASE, GAMMA-GLUTAMYL HYDROLASES, REDUCTASE-THYMIDYLATE SYNTHASE, PARA-AMINOBENZOATE SYNTHESIS, natural variation, agroeconomics, neural tube defects, GTP CYCLOHYDROLASE-I, metabolic engineering, biofortification, ONE-CARBON METABOLISM, PRECURSOR P-AMINOBENZOATE, PARASITE LEISHMANIA-MAJOR
journal title
CRITICAL REVIEWS IN PLANT SCIENCES
Crit. Rev. Plant Sci.
volume
29
issue
1
pages
14 - 35
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000277518200002
JCR category
PLANT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
3.821 (2010)
JCR rank
19/185 (2010)
JCR quartile
1 (2010)
ISSN
0735-2689
DOI
10.1080/07352680903436283
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
980368
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-980368
date created
2010-06-17 15:20:29
date last changed
2015-06-17 11:26:45
@article{980368,
  abstract     = {Folates are of paramount importance in one-carbon metabolism of most organisms. Plants and microorganisms are able to synthesize folates de novo, making them the main dietary source for humans and animals, which are dependent on food or feed supplies for folates. Folate deficiency is an increasing problem in the developing, as well as in the developed regions of the world, affecting millions of people. Different strategies, such as food fortification and folic acid supplementation, remain far from accessible for the poor rural populations in developing countries. Increasing knowledge concerning folate biosynthesis, transport and catabolism does not only deepen our insight on the regulation of folate metabolism but also provides the keys towards folate enhancement through metabolic engineering in bacteria, as well as in plants. Recently, promising results were obtained using such an approach, but further fundamental research is a prerequisite to develop a practicable solution to fight folate deficiency. In parallel, progress in the development and improvement of folate analysis has been made. Here, we provide the state-of-the-art of folate biosynthesis, catabolism, and salvage. Finally, we report on progress in folate biofortification and discuss the agroeconomical aspect of biofortified crop plants.},
  author       = {Blancquaert, Dieter and Storojenko, Serguei and Loizeau, Karen and De Steur, Hans and De Brouwer, Veerle and Viaene, Jacques and Ravanel, St{\'e}phane and R{\'e}beill{\'e}, Fabrice and Lambert, Willy and Van Der Straeten, Dominique},
  issn         = {0735-2689},
  journal      = {CRITICAL REVIEWS IN PLANT SCIENCES},
  keyword      = {NEURAL-TUBE DEFECTS,CELL-FREE EXTRACTS,GUANOSINE TRIPHOSPHATE CYCLOHYDROLASE,GAMMA-GLUTAMYL HYDROLASES,REDUCTASE-THYMIDYLATE SYNTHASE,PARA-AMINOBENZOATE SYNTHESIS,natural variation,agroeconomics,neural tube defects,GTP CYCLOHYDROLASE-I,metabolic engineering,biofortification,ONE-CARBON METABOLISM,PRECURSOR P-AMINOBENZOATE,PARASITE LEISHMANIA-MAJOR},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {14--35},
  title        = {Folates and folic acid: from fundamental research toward sustainable health},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07352680903436283},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Blancquaert, Dieter, Serguei Storojenko, Karen Loizeau, Hans De Steur, Veerle De Brouwer, Jacques Viaene, Stéphane Ravanel, Fabrice Rébeillé, Willy Lambert, and Dominique Van Der Straeten. 2010. “Folates and Folic Acid: From Fundamental Research Toward Sustainable Health.” Critical Reviews in Plant Sciences 29 (1): 14–35.
APA
Blancquaert, D., Storojenko, S., Loizeau, K., De Steur, H., De Brouwer, V., Viaene, J., Ravanel, S., et al. (2010). Folates and folic acid: from fundamental research toward sustainable health. CRITICAL REVIEWS IN PLANT SCIENCES, 29(1), 14–35.
Vancouver
1.
Blancquaert D, Storojenko S, Loizeau K, De Steur H, De Brouwer V, Viaene J, et al. Folates and folic acid: from fundamental research toward sustainable health. CRITICAL REVIEWS IN PLANT SCIENCES. 2010;29(1):14–35.
MLA
Blancquaert, Dieter, Serguei Storojenko, Karen Loizeau, et al. “Folates and Folic Acid: From Fundamental Research Toward Sustainable Health.” CRITICAL REVIEWS IN PLANT SCIENCES 29.1 (2010): 14–35. Print.