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Micro-CT of corrosion casts for use in the computer-aided design of microvasculature

William Lafayette Mondy, Don Cameron, Jean-Pierre Timmermans, Nora De Clerck, Alexander Sasov, Christophe Casteleyn UGent and Les A Piegl (2009) TISSUE ENGINEERING PART C-METHODS. 15(4). p.729-738
abstract
Two-dimensional micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) slices can be reconstructed into three-dimensional (3D) models that demonstrate capillary beds. This study focused on the acquisition of data necessary to create scaffolding that directly mimics the unique structural patterns of a microvascular tree system. The Microfil (TM) vascular contrasting method was compared to the Baston's methylmethacrylate corrosion casting (BMCC) method to determine which provided the most accurate and high-resolution results for 3D micro-CT reconstruction derived from the two-dimensional micro-CT slices of the capillary beds. It was determined that the BMCC, a method traditionally used in the scanning electron microscopic analysis of the microvasculature, was the best method for representing capillary lumina for micro-CT scanning. The removal of tissues from the BMCC cast resulted in samples that eliminated background material, thus increasing the X-ray contrast levels of the CT images. This provided for a more complete and more distinguishable high-resolution image of the represented capillary lumina. Images created with this BMCC method were reconstructed in a stereolithography file format as 3D mesh structure for later importing into computer-aided design (CAD) software. The resulting Bio-CAD, then, can be used to guide the more accurate fabrication of the microvascular scaffolding and then serve as the framework for tissue engineering of microvascular structures. Results from this study clearly indicated that the BMCC method is superior to the Microfil method for accurate and complete high-resolution imaging of capillary beds.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
GOLD NANOPARTICLES, POOL CONTRAST AGENT, IN-VIVO, BIO-CAD, TOMOGRAPHY, TISSUE, VISUALIZATION, LUNG, QUANTIFICATION, ANGIOGRAPHY
journal title
TISSUE ENGINEERING PART C-METHODS
Tissue Eng. Part C-Methods
volume
15
issue
4
pages
729 - 738
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000272609100020
ISSN
1937-3384
DOI
10.1089/ten.tec.2008.0583
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
978237
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-978237
date created
2010-06-14 15:37:04
date last changed
2010-06-29 15:12:41
@article{978237,
  abstract     = {Two-dimensional micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) slices can be reconstructed into three-dimensional (3D) models that demonstrate capillary beds. This study focused on the acquisition of data necessary to create scaffolding that directly mimics the unique structural patterns of a microvascular tree system. The Microfil (TM) vascular contrasting method was compared to the Baston's methylmethacrylate corrosion casting (BMCC) method to determine which provided the most accurate and high-resolution results for 3D micro-CT reconstruction derived from the two-dimensional micro-CT slices of the capillary beds. It was determined that the BMCC, a method traditionally used in the scanning electron microscopic analysis of the microvasculature, was the best method for representing capillary lumina for micro-CT scanning. The removal of tissues from the BMCC cast resulted in samples that eliminated background material, thus increasing the X-ray contrast levels of the CT images. This provided for a more complete and more distinguishable high-resolution image of the represented capillary lumina. Images created with this BMCC method were reconstructed in a stereolithography file format as 3D mesh structure for later importing into computer-aided design (CAD) software. The resulting Bio-CAD, then, can be used to guide the more accurate fabrication of the microvascular scaffolding and then serve as the framework for tissue engineering of microvascular structures. Results from this study clearly indicated that the BMCC method is superior to the Microfil method for accurate and complete high-resolution imaging of capillary beds.},
  author       = {Mondy, William Lafayette and Cameron, Don and Timmermans, Jean-Pierre and De Clerck, Nora and Sasov, Alexander and Casteleyn, Christophe and Piegl, Les A},
  issn         = {1937-3384},
  journal      = {TISSUE ENGINEERING PART C-METHODS},
  keyword      = {GOLD NANOPARTICLES,POOL CONTRAST AGENT,IN-VIVO,BIO-CAD,TOMOGRAPHY,TISSUE,VISUALIZATION,LUNG,QUANTIFICATION,ANGIOGRAPHY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {729--738},
  title        = {Micro-CT of corrosion casts for use in the computer-aided design of microvasculature},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/ten.tec.2008.0583},
  volume       = {15},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Mondy, William Lafayette, Don Cameron, Jean-Pierre Timmermans, Nora De Clerck, Alexander Sasov, Christophe Casteleyn, and Les A Piegl. 2009. “Micro-CT of Corrosion Casts for Use in the Computer-aided Design of Microvasculature.” Tissue Engineering Part C-methods 15 (4): 729–738.
APA
Mondy, W. L., Cameron, D., Timmermans, J.-P., De Clerck, N., Sasov, A., Casteleyn, C., & Piegl, L. A. (2009). Micro-CT of corrosion casts for use in the computer-aided design of microvasculature. TISSUE ENGINEERING PART C-METHODS, 15(4), 729–738.
Vancouver
1.
Mondy WL, Cameron D, Timmermans J-P, De Clerck N, Sasov A, Casteleyn C, et al. Micro-CT of corrosion casts for use in the computer-aided design of microvasculature. TISSUE ENGINEERING PART C-METHODS. 2009;15(4):729–38.
MLA
Mondy, William Lafayette, Don Cameron, Jean-Pierre Timmermans, et al. “Micro-CT of Corrosion Casts for Use in the Computer-aided Design of Microvasculature.” TISSUE ENGINEERING PART C-METHODS 15.4 (2009): 729–738. Print.