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The Individual Consistency of Acquiescence and Extreme Response Style in Self-Report Questionnaires

Bert Weijters UGent, Maggie Geuens UGent and Niels Schillewaert (2010) APPLIED PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT. 34(2). p.105-121
abstract
The severity of bias in respondents' self-reports due to acquiescence response style (ARS) and extreme response style (ERS) depends strongly on how consistent these response styles are over the course of a questionnaire. In the literature, different alternative hypotheses on response style (in) consistency circulate. Therefore, nine alternative models are derived and fitted to secondary and primary data. It is found that response styles are best modeled as a tau-equivalent factor complemented with a time-invariant autoregressive effect. This means that ARS and ERS are largely but not completely consistent over the course of a questionnaire, a finding that has important implications for response style measurement and correction.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
SCALES, VARIABLES, COUNTRIES, COMPONENTS, BIAS, MODEL, RATINGS, SETS
journal title
APPLIED PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT
Appl. Psychol. Meas.
volume
34
issue
2
pages
17 pages
publisher
SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC
place of publication
THOUSAND OAKS
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000274431200003
JCR category
SOCIAL SCIENCES, MATHEMATICAL METHODS
JCR impact factor
1.137 (2010)
JCR rank
18/42 (2010)
JCR quartile
2 (2010)
ISSN
0146-6216
DOI
10.1177/0146621609338593
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
967231
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-967231
date created
2010-06-01 12:07:28
date last changed
2017-01-02 09:55:28
@article{967231,
  abstract     = {The severity of bias in respondents' self-reports due to acquiescence response style (ARS) and extreme response style (ERS) depends strongly on how consistent these response styles are over the course of a questionnaire. In the literature, different alternative hypotheses on response style (in) consistency circulate. Therefore, nine alternative models are derived and fitted to secondary and primary data. It is found that response styles are best modeled as a tau-equivalent factor complemented with a time-invariant autoregressive effect. This means that ARS and ERS are largely but not completely consistent over the course of a questionnaire, a finding that has important implications for response style measurement and correction.},
  author       = {Weijters, Bert and Geuens, Maggie and Schillewaert, Niels},
  issn         = {0146-6216},
  journal      = {APPLIED PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT},
  keyword      = {SCALES,VARIABLES,COUNTRIES,COMPONENTS,BIAS,MODEL,RATINGS,SETS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {105--121},
  publisher    = {SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC},
  title        = {The Individual Consistency of Acquiescence and Extreme Response Style in Self-Report Questionnaires},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0146621609338593},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Weijters, Bert, Maggie Geuens, and Niels Schillewaert. 2010. “The Individual Consistency of Acquiescence and Extreme Response Style in Self-Report Questionnaires.” Applied Psychological Measurement 34 (2): 105–121.
APA
Weijters, B., Geuens, M., & Schillewaert, N. (2010). The Individual Consistency of Acquiescence and Extreme Response Style in Self-Report Questionnaires. APPLIED PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT, 34(2), 105–121.
Vancouver
1.
Weijters B, Geuens M, Schillewaert N. The Individual Consistency of Acquiescence and Extreme Response Style in Self-Report Questionnaires. APPLIED PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT. THOUSAND OAKS: SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC; 2010;34(2):105–21.
MLA
Weijters, Bert, Maggie Geuens, and Niels Schillewaert. “The Individual Consistency of Acquiescence and Extreme Response Style in Self-Report Questionnaires.” APPLIED PSYCHOLOGICAL MEASUREMENT 34.2 (2010): 105–121. Print.