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Repetitive exploration towards locations that no longer carry a target in patients with neglect

(2010) JOURNAL OF NEUROPSYCHOLOGY. 4(1). p.33-45
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Abstract
About 50% of neglect patients show ipsilesional target re-exploration on neglect tasks and in daily life. The present study examines whether omissions and revisitings are due to disengagement failure from visible stimuli on the ipsilesional side. Thirteen patients with neglect and nine healthy controls were tested with three versions of the Bells test on touch screen, i.e. a standard cancellation in which targets have to be marked, an erase cancellation in which targets have to be erased, and a condition in which all items (including distracters) have to be erased. Whereas omissions decreased in the full-erase condition, revisitings were the most prominent in this condition. Our study shows that neglect patients also return to previously visited locations which no longer carry a target.
Keywords
SPATIAL NEGLECT, SEARCH, UNILATERAL NEGLECT, VISUAL NEGLECT, PERSEVERATIVE RESPONSES, VISUOSPATIAL NEGLECT, ATTENTION, HEMISPATIAL NEGLECT, PARIETAL, CANCELLATION

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Citation

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MLA
Nys, Gudrun, Marije Stuart, and H Chris Dijkerman. “Repetitive Exploration Towards Locations That No Longer Carry a Target in Patients with Neglect.” JOURNAL OF NEUROPSYCHOLOGY 4.1 (2010): 33–45. Print.
APA
Nys, G., Stuart, M., & Dijkerman, H. C. (2010). Repetitive exploration towards locations that no longer carry a target in patients with neglect. JOURNAL OF NEUROPSYCHOLOGY, 4(1), 33–45.
Chicago author-date
Nys, Gudrun, Marije Stuart, and H Chris Dijkerman. 2010. “Repetitive Exploration Towards Locations That No Longer Carry a Target in Patients with Neglect.” Journal of Neuropsychology 4 (1): 33–45.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Nys, Gudrun, Marije Stuart, and H Chris Dijkerman. 2010. “Repetitive Exploration Towards Locations That No Longer Carry a Target in Patients with Neglect.” Journal of Neuropsychology 4 (1): 33–45.
Vancouver
1.
Nys G, Stuart M, Dijkerman HC. Repetitive exploration towards locations that no longer carry a target in patients with neglect. JOURNAL OF NEUROPSYCHOLOGY. 2010;4(1):33–45.
IEEE
[1]
G. Nys, M. Stuart, and H. C. Dijkerman, “Repetitive exploration towards locations that no longer carry a target in patients with neglect,” JOURNAL OF NEUROPSYCHOLOGY, vol. 4, no. 1, pp. 33–45, 2010.
@article{954787,
  abstract     = {{About 50% of neglect patients show ipsilesional target re-exploration on neglect tasks and in daily life. The present study examines whether omissions and revisitings are due to disengagement failure from visible stimuli on the ipsilesional side. Thirteen patients with neglect and nine healthy controls were tested with three versions of the Bells test on touch screen, i.e. a standard cancellation in which targets have to be marked, an erase cancellation in which targets have to be erased, and a condition in which all items (including distracters) have to be erased. Whereas omissions decreased in the full-erase condition, revisitings were the most prominent in this condition. Our study shows that neglect patients also return to previously visited locations which no longer carry a target.}},
  author       = {{Nys, Gudrun and Stuart, Marije and Dijkerman, H Chris}},
  issn         = {{1748-6645}},
  journal      = {{JOURNAL OF NEUROPSYCHOLOGY}},
  keywords     = {{SPATIAL NEGLECT,SEARCH,UNILATERAL NEGLECT,VISUAL NEGLECT,PERSEVERATIVE RESPONSES,VISUOSPATIAL NEGLECT,ATTENTION,HEMISPATIAL NEGLECT,PARIETAL,CANCELLATION}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{1}},
  pages        = {{33--45}},
  title        = {{Repetitive exploration towards locations that no longer carry a target in patients with neglect}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1348/174866408X402424}},
  volume       = {{4}},
  year         = {{2010}},
}

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