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A falls concern scale for people with spinal cord injury (SCI-FCS)

CL Boswell-Ruys, LA Harvey, Kim Delbaere UGent and SR Lord (2010) SPINAL CORD. 48(9). p.704-709
abstract
Study design: Observational study and cross-sectional survey. Objectives: To develop a scale assessing concern about falling in people with spinal cord injuries who are dependent on manual wheelchairs, and to evaluate psychometric properties of this new scale. Setting: Community and hospitals, Australia. Methods: The Spinal Cord Injury-Falls Concern Scale (SCI-FCS) was developed in consultation with SCI professionals. The SCI-FCS addressed concern about falling during 16 activities of daily living associated with falling and specific to people with SCI. One hundred and twenty-five people with either acute or chronic SCI who used manual wheelchairs were assessed on the SCI-FCS and asked questions related to their SCI and overall physical abilities. A subgroup of 20 people was reassessed on the SCI-FCS within 7 days. Results: The SCI-FCS had excellent internal and test-retest reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.92, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.93). Factor analysis revealed three underlying dimensions of the SCI-FCS addressing concern about falling during activities that limit hand support and require movement of the body's centre of mass. The discriminative ability of the SCI-FCS between different diagnostic groups indicated good construct validity. Subjects with a high level of SCI, few previous falls, dependence in vertical transfers and poor perceived sitting ability demonstrated high levels of concern about falling. Conclusions: This study suggests that the SCI-FCS is a valid and reliable tool for assessing concern about falling in people with SCI dependent on manual wheelchairs. The SCI-FCS could also assist in determining the effectiveness of fall minimization programs.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
OUTCOMES, USERS, DIRECTIONS, WHEELCHAIR, falls efficacy, accidental falls, rehabilitation, spinal cord injuries
journal title
SPINAL CORD
Spinal Cord
volume
48
issue
9
pages
704 - 709
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000281577000009
JCR category
REHABILITATION
JCR impact factor
1.826 (2010)
JCR rank
13/42 (2010)
JCR quartile
2 (2010)
ISSN
1362-4393
DOI
10.1038/sc.2010.1
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
953719
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-953719
date created
2010-05-27 06:06:26
date last changed
2010-12-10 11:31:05
@article{953719,
  abstract     = {Study design: Observational study and cross-sectional survey.
Objectives: To develop a scale assessing concern about falling in people with spinal cord injuries who are dependent on manual wheelchairs, and to evaluate psychometric properties of this new scale.
Setting: Community and hospitals, Australia.
Methods: The Spinal Cord Injury-Falls Concern Scale (SCI-FCS) was developed in consultation with SCI professionals. The SCI-FCS addressed concern about falling during 16 activities of daily living associated with falling and specific to people with SCI. One hundred and twenty-five people with either acute or chronic SCI who used manual wheelchairs were assessed on the SCI-FCS and asked questions related to their SCI and overall physical abilities. A subgroup of 20 people was reassessed on the SCI-FCS within 7 days.
Results: The SCI-FCS had excellent internal and test-retest reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.92, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.93). Factor analysis revealed three underlying dimensions of the SCI-FCS addressing concern about falling during activities that limit hand support and require movement of the body's centre of mass. The discriminative ability of the SCI-FCS between different diagnostic groups indicated good construct validity. Subjects with a high level of SCI, few previous falls, dependence in vertical transfers and poor perceived sitting ability demonstrated high levels of concern about falling.
Conclusions: This study suggests that the SCI-FCS is a valid and reliable tool for assessing concern about falling in people with SCI dependent on manual wheelchairs. The SCI-FCS could also assist in determining the effectiveness of fall minimization programs.},
  author       = {Boswell-Ruys, CL and Harvey, LA and Delbaere, Kim and Lord, SR},
  issn         = {1362-4393},
  journal      = {SPINAL CORD},
  keyword      = {OUTCOMES,USERS,DIRECTIONS,WHEELCHAIR,falls efficacy,accidental falls,rehabilitation,spinal cord injuries},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {704--709},
  title        = {A falls concern scale for people with spinal cord injury (SCI-FCS)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sc.2010.1},
  volume       = {48},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Boswell-Ruys, CL, LA Harvey, Kim Delbaere, and SR Lord. 2010. “A Falls Concern Scale for People with Spinal Cord Injury (SCI-FCS).” Spinal Cord 48 (9): 704–709.
APA
Boswell-Ruys, C., Harvey, L., Delbaere, K., & Lord, S. (2010). A falls concern scale for people with spinal cord injury (SCI-FCS). SPINAL CORD, 48(9), 704–709.
Vancouver
1.
Boswell-Ruys C, Harvey L, Delbaere K, Lord S. A falls concern scale for people with spinal cord injury (SCI-FCS). SPINAL CORD. 2010;48(9):704–9.
MLA
Boswell-Ruys, CL, LA Harvey, Kim Delbaere, et al. “A Falls Concern Scale for People with Spinal Cord Injury (SCI-FCS).” SPINAL CORD 48.9 (2010): 704–709. Print.