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A falls concern scale for people with spinal cord injury (SCI-FCS)

(2010) SPINAL CORD. 48(9). p.704-709
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Abstract
Study design: Observational study and cross-sectional survey. Objectives: To develop a scale assessing concern about falling in people with spinal cord injuries who are dependent on manual wheelchairs, and to evaluate psychometric properties of this new scale. Setting: Community and hospitals, Australia. Methods: The Spinal Cord Injury-Falls Concern Scale (SCI-FCS) was developed in consultation with SCI professionals. The SCI-FCS addressed concern about falling during 16 activities of daily living associated with falling and specific to people with SCI. One hundred and twenty-five people with either acute or chronic SCI who used manual wheelchairs were assessed on the SCI-FCS and asked questions related to their SCI and overall physical abilities. A subgroup of 20 people was reassessed on the SCI-FCS within 7 days. Results: The SCI-FCS had excellent internal and test-retest reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.92, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.93). Factor analysis revealed three underlying dimensions of the SCI-FCS addressing concern about falling during activities that limit hand support and require movement of the body's centre of mass. The discriminative ability of the SCI-FCS between different diagnostic groups indicated good construct validity. Subjects with a high level of SCI, few previous falls, dependence in vertical transfers and poor perceived sitting ability demonstrated high levels of concern about falling. Conclusions: This study suggests that the SCI-FCS is a valid and reliable tool for assessing concern about falling in people with SCI dependent on manual wheelchairs. The SCI-FCS could also assist in determining the effectiveness of fall minimization programs.
Keywords
USERS, OUTCOMES, DIRECTIONS, WHEELCHAIR, falls efficacy, accidental falls, rehabilitation, spinal cord injuries

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Chicago
Boswell-Ruys, CL, LA Harvey, Kim Delbaere, and SR Lord. 2010. “A Falls Concern Scale for People with Spinal Cord Injury (SCI-FCS).” Spinal Cord 48 (9): 704–709.
APA
Boswell-Ruys, C., Harvey, L., Delbaere, K., & Lord, S. (2010). A falls concern scale for people with spinal cord injury (SCI-FCS). SPINAL CORD, 48(9), 704–709.
Vancouver
1.
Boswell-Ruys C, Harvey L, Delbaere K, Lord S. A falls concern scale for people with spinal cord injury (SCI-FCS). SPINAL CORD. 2010;48(9):704–9.
MLA
Boswell-Ruys, CL, LA Harvey, Kim Delbaere, et al. “A Falls Concern Scale for People with Spinal Cord Injury (SCI-FCS).” SPINAL CORD 48.9 (2010): 704–709. Print.
@article{953719,
  abstract     = {Study design: Observational study and cross-sectional survey.
Objectives: To develop a scale assessing concern about falling in people with spinal cord injuries who are dependent on manual wheelchairs, and to evaluate psychometric properties of this new scale.
Setting: Community and hospitals, Australia.
Methods: The Spinal Cord Injury-Falls Concern Scale (SCI-FCS) was developed in consultation with SCI professionals. The SCI-FCS addressed concern about falling during 16 activities of daily living associated with falling and specific to people with SCI. One hundred and twenty-five people with either acute or chronic SCI who used manual wheelchairs were assessed on the SCI-FCS and asked questions related to their SCI and overall physical abilities. A subgroup of 20 people was reassessed on the SCI-FCS within 7 days.
Results: The SCI-FCS had excellent internal and test-retest reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.92, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.93). Factor analysis revealed three underlying dimensions of the SCI-FCS addressing concern about falling during activities that limit hand support and require movement of the body's centre of mass. The discriminative ability of the SCI-FCS between different diagnostic groups indicated good construct validity. Subjects with a high level of SCI, few previous falls, dependence in vertical transfers and poor perceived sitting ability demonstrated high levels of concern about falling.
Conclusions: This study suggests that the SCI-FCS is a valid and reliable tool for assessing concern about falling in people with SCI dependent on manual wheelchairs. The SCI-FCS could also assist in determining the effectiveness of fall minimization programs.},
  author       = {Boswell-Ruys, CL and Harvey, LA and Delbaere, Kim and Lord, SR},
  issn         = {1362-4393},
  journal      = {SPINAL CORD},
  keyword      = {USERS,OUTCOMES,DIRECTIONS,WHEELCHAIR,falls efficacy,accidental falls,rehabilitation,spinal cord injuries},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {704--709},
  title        = {A falls concern scale for people with spinal cord injury (SCI-FCS)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/sc.2010.1},
  volume       = {48},
  year         = {2010},
}

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