Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Determinants of disparities between perceived and physiological risk of falling among elderly people: cohort study

Kim Delbaere UGent, Jacqueline CT Close, Henry Brodaty, Perminder Sachdev and Stephen R Lord (2010) BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL. 341.
abstract
Objectives To gain an understanding of elderly people's fear of falling by exploring the prevalence and determinants of perceived and physiological fall risk and to understand the role of disparities in perceived and physiological risk in the cause of falls. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Community sample drawn from eastern Sydney, Australia. Participants 500 men and women aged 70-90 years. Main outcome measures Baseline assessment of medical, physiological, and neuropsychological measures, with physiological fall risk estimated with the physiological profile assessment, and perceived fall risk estimated with the falls efficacy scale international. Participants were followed up monthly for falls over one year. Results Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that perceived and physiological fall risk were both independent predictors of future falls. Classification tree analysis was used to split the sample into four groups (vigorous, anxious, stoic, and aware) based on the disparity between physiological and perceived risk of falling. Perceived fall risk was congruent with physiological fall risk in the vigorous (144 (29%)) and aware (202 (40%)) groups. The anxious group (54 (11%)) had a low physiological risk but high perceived fall risk, which was related to depressive symptoms (P=0.029), neurotic personality traits (P=0.026), and decreased executive functioning (P=0.010). The stoic group (100 (20%)) had a high physiological risk but low perceived fall risk, which was protective for falling and mediated through a positive outlook on life (P=0.001) and maintained physical activity and community participation (P=0.048). Conclusion Many elderly people underestimated or overestimated their risk of falling. Such disparities between perceived and physiological fall risk were primarily associated with psychological measures and strongly influenced the probability of falling. Measures of both physiological and perceived fall risk should be included in fall risk assessments to allow tailoring of interventions for preventing falls in elderly people.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
AVOIDANCE, EXERCISE, PREVENTION, COMMUNITY, FEAR, RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL, LIVING OLDER-PEOPLE, INTERVENTION, EFFICACY, VALIDATION
journal title
BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL
Br. Med. J.
volume
341
article_number
c4165
pages
8 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000281213400004
JCR category
MEDICINE, GENERAL & INTERNAL
JCR impact factor
13.471 (2010)
JCR rank
6/151 (2010)
JCR quartile
1 (2010)
ISSN
0959-535X
DOI
10.1136/bmj.c4165
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
953701
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-953701
date created
2010-05-27 06:06:26
date last changed
2015-06-17 11:25:52
@article{953701,
  abstract     = {Objectives To gain an understanding of elderly people's fear of falling by exploring the prevalence and determinants of perceived and physiological fall risk and to understand the role of disparities in perceived and physiological risk in the cause of falls.
Design Prospective cohort study.
Setting Community sample drawn from eastern Sydney, Australia.
Participants 500 men and women aged 70-90 years.
Main outcome measures Baseline assessment of medical, physiological, and neuropsychological measures, with physiological fall risk estimated with the physiological profile assessment, and perceived fall risk estimated with the falls efficacy scale international. Participants were followed up monthly for falls over one year.
Results Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that perceived and physiological fall risk were both independent predictors of future falls. Classification tree analysis was used to split the sample into four groups (vigorous, anxious, stoic, and aware) based on the disparity between physiological and perceived risk of falling. Perceived fall risk was congruent with physiological fall risk in the vigorous (144 (29\%)) and aware (202 (40\%)) groups. The anxious group (54 (11\%)) had a low physiological risk but high perceived fall risk, which was related to depressive symptoms (P=0.029), neurotic personality traits (P=0.026), and decreased executive functioning (P=0.010). The stoic group (100 (20\%)) had a high physiological risk but low perceived fall risk, which was protective for falling and mediated through a positive outlook on life (P=0.001) and maintained physical activity and community participation (P=0.048).
Conclusion Many elderly people underestimated or overestimated their risk of falling. Such disparities between perceived and physiological fall risk were primarily associated with psychological measures and strongly influenced the probability of falling. Measures of both physiological and perceived fall risk should be included in fall risk assessments to allow tailoring of interventions for preventing falls in elderly people.},
  articleno    = {c4165},
  author       = {Delbaere, Kim and Close, Jacqueline CT and Brodaty, Henry and Sachdev, Perminder and Lord, Stephen R},
  issn         = {0959-535X},
  journal      = {BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL},
  keyword      = {AVOIDANCE,EXERCISE,PREVENTION,COMMUNITY,FEAR,RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL,LIVING OLDER-PEOPLE,INTERVENTION,EFFICACY,VALIDATION},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {8},
  title        = {Determinants of disparities between perceived and physiological risk of falling among elderly people: cohort study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bmj.c4165},
  volume       = {341},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Delbaere, Kim, Jacqueline CT Close, Henry Brodaty, Perminder Sachdev, and Stephen R Lord. 2010. “Determinants of Disparities Between Perceived and Physiological Risk of Falling Among Elderly People: Cohort Study.” British Medical Journal 341.
APA
Delbaere, K., Close, J. C., Brodaty, H., Sachdev, P., & Lord, S. R. (2010). Determinants of disparities between perceived and physiological risk of falling among elderly people: cohort study. BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL, 341.
Vancouver
1.
Delbaere K, Close JC, Brodaty H, Sachdev P, Lord SR. Determinants of disparities between perceived and physiological risk of falling among elderly people: cohort study. BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL. 2010;341.
MLA
Delbaere, Kim, Jacqueline CT Close, Henry Brodaty, et al. “Determinants of Disparities Between Perceived and Physiological Risk of Falling Among Elderly People: Cohort Study.” BRITISH MEDICAL JOURNAL 341 (2010): n. pag. Print.