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Human ankle cartilage deformation after different in vivo impact conditions

Ans Van Ginckel UGent, Karl Almqvist UGent, Koenraad Verstraete UGent, Philip Roosen UGent and Erik Witvrouw UGent (2011) KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY. 19(1). p.137-143
abstract
Recently, the general finding of increased ankle cartilage stiffness to loading has been challenged, suggesting the need for the investigation of different in vivo loading conditions. Therefore, the objectives of the present study were to determine ankle (talar) cartilage deformation after in vivo loading using 3D volume change calculation and to establish any difference in volume change between four weight-bearing exercises. The four exercises represented increasing impact (bilateral knee bends <unilateral knee bends <drop jumps) as well as two types of loading: dynamic and static loading (i.e. unilateral knee bends and unilateral static stance). Based on MRI, 3D reconstructions of talar cartilage were generated to determine 3D volumes before and after four exercises in 13 healthy subjects (bilateral and unilateral knee bends, static unilateral stance, drop jumps). Mean talar deformation (volume decrease) was 8.3% after bilateral knee bends (P = 0.001), 7.7% after unilateral knee bends (P = 0.020), 14.6% after unilateral static stance (P < 0.001), 12.5% after drop jumps (P = 0.001). Statistical analysis also revealed deformation to be significantly higher after unilateral static stance than after unilateral knee bends (P = 0.017). These results suggest that talar cartilage endures substantial deformation during in vivo loading characterized by more deformation (i.e. higher volume change) after static than after dynamic loading.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
In vivo, Exercise, Ankle, Cartilage, ARTICULAR-CARTILAGE, CONTACT DEFORMATION, HUMAN KNEE, JOINTS, OSTEOARTHRITIS, TRANSPORT, BEHAVIOR
journal title
KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY
Knee Surg. Sports Traumatol. Arthrosc.
volume
19
issue
1
pages
137 - 143
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000286529200023
JCR category
SPORT SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
2.209 (2011)
JCR rank
17/83 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
0942-2056
DOI
10.1007/s00167-010-1159-4
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
951770
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-951770
date created
2010-05-24 18:40:08
date last changed
2015-06-17 11:25:47
@article{951770,
  abstract     = {Recently, the general finding of increased ankle cartilage stiffness to loading has been challenged, suggesting the need for the investigation of different in vivo loading conditions. Therefore, the objectives of the present study were to determine ankle (talar) cartilage deformation after in vivo loading using 3D volume change calculation and to establish any difference in volume change between four weight-bearing exercises. The four exercises represented increasing impact (bilateral knee bends {\textlangle}unilateral knee bends {\textlangle}drop jumps) as well as two types of loading: dynamic and static loading (i.e. unilateral knee bends and unilateral static stance). Based on MRI, 3D reconstructions of talar cartilage were generated to determine 3D volumes before and after four exercises in 13 healthy subjects (bilateral and unilateral knee bends, static unilateral stance, drop jumps). Mean talar deformation (volume decrease) was 8.3\% after bilateral knee bends (P = 0.001), 7.7\% after unilateral knee bends (P = 0.020), 14.6\% after unilateral static stance (P {\textlangle} 0.001), 12.5\% after drop jumps (P = 0.001). Statistical analysis also revealed deformation to be significantly higher after unilateral static stance than after unilateral knee bends (P = 0.017). These results suggest that talar cartilage endures substantial deformation during in vivo loading characterized by more deformation (i.e. higher volume change) after static than after dynamic loading.},
  author       = {Van Ginckel, Ans and Almqvist, Karl and Verstraete, Koenraad and Roosen, Philip and Witvrouw, Erik},
  issn         = {0942-2056},
  journal      = {KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY},
  keyword      = {In vivo,Exercise,Ankle,Cartilage,ARTICULAR-CARTILAGE,CONTACT DEFORMATION,HUMAN KNEE,JOINTS,OSTEOARTHRITIS,TRANSPORT,BEHAVIOR},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {137--143},
  title        = {Human ankle cartilage deformation after different in vivo impact conditions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00167-010-1159-4},
  volume       = {19},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
Van Ginckel, Ans, Karl Almqvist, Koenraad Verstraete, Philip Roosen, and Erik Witvrouw. 2011. “Human Ankle Cartilage Deformation After Different in Vivo Impact Conditions.” Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy 19 (1): 137–143.
APA
Van Ginckel, A., Almqvist, K., Verstraete, K., Roosen, P., & Witvrouw, E. (2011). Human ankle cartilage deformation after different in vivo impact conditions. KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY, 19(1), 137–143.
Vancouver
1.
Van Ginckel A, Almqvist K, Verstraete K, Roosen P, Witvrouw E. Human ankle cartilage deformation after different in vivo impact conditions. KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY. 2011;19(1):137–43.
MLA
Van Ginckel, Ans, Karl Almqvist, Koenraad Verstraete, et al. “Human Ankle Cartilage Deformation After Different in Vivo Impact Conditions.” KNEE SURGERY SPORTS TRAUMATOLOGY ARTHROSCOPY 19.1 (2011): 137–143. Print.