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An intraspecific application of the leaf-height-seed ecology strategy scheme to forest herbs along a latitudinal gradient

(2011) ECOGRAPHY. 34(1). p.132-140
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Abstract
We measured LHS traits in 41 Anemone nemorosa and 44 Milium effusum populations along a 1900-2300 km latitudinal gradient from N France to N Sweden. We then applied multilevel models to identify the effects of regional (temperature, latitude) and local (soil fertility and acidity, overstorey canopy cover) environmental factors on LHS traits. Both species displayed a significant 4% increase in plant height with every degree northward shift (almost a two-fold plant height difference between the southernmost and northernmost populations). Neither seed mass nor SLA showed a significant latitudinal cline. Temperature had a large effect on the three LHS traits of Anemone. Latitude, canopy cover and soil nutrients were related to the SLA and plant height of Milium. None of the investigated variables appeared to be related to the seed mass of Milium. The variation in LHS traits indicates that the ecological strategy determined by the position of each population in this three-factor triangle is not constant along the latitudinal gradient. The significant increase in plant height suggests greater competitive abilities for both species in the northernmost populations. We also found that the studied environmental factors affected the LHS traits of the two species on various scales: spring-flowering Anemone was affected more by temperature, whereas early-summer flowering Milium was affected more by local and other latitude-related factors. Finally, previously reported cross-species correlations between LHS traits and latitude were generally unsupported by our within-species approach.
Keywords
GLOBAL PATTERNS, FUNCTIONAL TRAITS, PLANT HEIGHT, LAND-USE, CLIMATE, MASS, VEGETATION, DISPERSAL, TEMPERATURE, REPRODUCTION

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Chicago
De Frenne, Pieter, Bente J Graae, Annette Kolb, Anna Shevtsova, Lander Baeten, Jörg Brunet, Olivier Chabrerie, et al. 2011. “An Intraspecific Application of the Leaf-height-seed Ecology Strategy Scheme to Forest Herbs Along a Latitudinal Gradient.” Ecography 34 (1): 132–140.
APA
De Frenne, P., Graae, B. J., Kolb, A., Shevtsova, A., Baeten, L., Brunet, J., Chabrerie, O., et al. (2011). An intraspecific application of the leaf-height-seed ecology strategy scheme to forest herbs along a latitudinal gradient. ECOGRAPHY, 34(1), 132–140.
Vancouver
1.
De Frenne P, Graae BJ, Kolb A, Shevtsova A, Baeten L, Brunet J, et al. An intraspecific application of the leaf-height-seed ecology strategy scheme to forest herbs along a latitudinal gradient. ECOGRAPHY. 2011;34(1):132–40.
MLA
De Frenne, Pieter, Bente J Graae, Annette Kolb, et al. “An Intraspecific Application of the Leaf-height-seed Ecology Strategy Scheme to Forest Herbs Along a Latitudinal Gradient.” ECOGRAPHY 34.1 (2011): 132–140. Print.
@article{934479,
  abstract     = {We measured LHS traits in 41 Anemone nemorosa and 44 Milium effusum populations along a 1900-2300 km latitudinal gradient from N France to N Sweden. We then applied multilevel models to identify the effects of regional (temperature, latitude) and local (soil fertility and acidity, overstorey canopy cover) environmental factors on LHS traits.
Both species displayed a significant 4\% increase in plant height with every degree northward shift (almost a two-fold plant height difference between the southernmost and northernmost populations). Neither seed mass nor SLA showed a significant latitudinal cline. Temperature had a large effect on the three LHS traits of Anemone. Latitude, canopy cover and soil nutrients were related to the SLA and plant height of Milium. None of the investigated variables appeared to be related to the seed mass of Milium.
The variation in LHS traits indicates that the ecological strategy determined by the position of each population in this three-factor triangle is not constant along the latitudinal gradient. The significant increase in plant height suggests greater competitive abilities for both species in the northernmost populations. We also found that the studied environmental factors affected the LHS traits of the two species on various scales: spring-flowering Anemone was affected more by temperature, whereas early-summer flowering Milium was affected more by local and other latitude-related factors. Finally, previously reported cross-species correlations between LHS traits and latitude were generally unsupported by our within-species approach.},
  author       = {De Frenne, Pieter and Graae, Bente J and Kolb, Annette and Shevtsova, Anna  and Baeten, Lander and Brunet, J{\"o}rg and Chabrerie, Olivier and Cousins, Sara and Decocq, Guillaume and Dhondt, Rob and Diekmann, Martin and Gruwez, Robert and Heinken, Thilo and Hermy, Martin and {\"O}ster, Mathias and Saguez, Robert and Stanton, Sharon and Tack, Wesley and Vanhellemont, Margot and Verheyen, Kris},
  issn         = {0906-7590},
  journal      = {ECOGRAPHY},
  keyword      = {GLOBAL PATTERNS,FUNCTIONAL TRAITS,PLANT HEIGHT,LAND-USE,CLIMATE,MASS,VEGETATION,DISPERSAL,TEMPERATURE,REPRODUCTION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {132--140},
  title        = {An intraspecific application of the leaf-height-seed ecology strategy scheme to forest herbs along a latitudinal gradient},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0587.2010.06399.x},
  volume       = {34},
  year         = {2011},
}

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