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A sentinel function for teat tissues in dairy cows: dominant innate immune response elements define early response to E. coli mastitis

Manuela Rinaldi UGent, Robert W Li, Douglas D Bannerman, Kristy M Daniels, Christina Evock-Clover, Marcos VB Silva, Max Paape UGent, Bernadette Van Ryssen UGent, Christian Burvenich UGent and Anthony Capuco UGent (2010) FUNCTIONAL & INTEGRATIVE GENOMICS. 10(1). p.21-38
abstract
Escherichia coli intramammary infection elicits localized and systemic responses, some of which have been characterized in mammary secretory tissue. Our objective was to characterize gene expression patterns that become activated in different regions of the mammary gland during the acute phase of experimentally induced E. coli mastitis. Tissues evaluated were from Furstenburg's rosette, teat cistern (TC), gland cistern (GC), and lobulo-alveolar (LA) regions of control and infected mammary glands, 12 and 24 h after bacterial (or control) infusions. The main networks activated by E. coli infection pertained to immune and inflammatory response, with marked induction of genes encoding proteins that function in chemotaxis and leukocyte activation and signaling. Genomic response at 12 h post-infection was greatest in tissues of the TC and GC. Only at 24 h post-infection did tissue from the LA region respond, at which time the response was the greatest of all regions. Similar genetic networks were impacted in all regions during early phases of intramammary infection, although regional differences throughout the gland were noted. Data support an important sentinel function for the teat, as these tissues responded rapidly and intensely, with production of cytokines and antimicrobial peptides.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Microarray, Escherichia coli, qRT-PCR, Network, GROWTH-FACTOR-ALPHA, ACUTE-PHASE RESPONSE, ESCHERICHIA-COLI, GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA, LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-BINDING PROTEIN, STAPHYLOCOCCUS-AUREUS, COMPLEMENT FRAGMENT C5A, MAMMARY EPITHELIAL-CELLS, Mastitis, Dairy cow, NF-KAPPA-B, BACTERICIDAL/PERMEABILITY-INCREASING PROTEIN
journal title
FUNCTIONAL & INTEGRATIVE GENOMICS
Funct. Integr. Genomics
volume
10
issue
1
pages
18 pages
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000275429100003
JCR category
GENETICS & HEREDITY
JCR impact factor
3.397 (2010)
JCR rank
55/154 (2010)
JCR quartile
2 (2010)
ISSN
1438-793X
DOI
10.1007/s10142-009-0133-z
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
924533
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-924533
alternative location
http://www.springerlink.com/content/k15v3q216561h271/
date created
2010-04-13 14:57:14
date last changed
2010-06-17 16:16:59
@article{924533,
  abstract     = {Escherichia coli intramammary infection elicits localized and systemic responses, some of which have been characterized in mammary secretory tissue. Our objective was to characterize gene expression patterns that become activated in different regions of the mammary gland during the acute phase of experimentally induced E. coli mastitis. Tissues evaluated were from Furstenburg's rosette, teat cistern (TC), gland cistern (GC), and lobulo-alveolar (LA) regions of control and infected mammary glands, 12 and 24 h after bacterial (or control) infusions. The main networks activated by E. coli infection pertained to immune and inflammatory response, with marked induction of genes encoding proteins that function in chemotaxis and leukocyte activation and signaling. Genomic response at 12 h post-infection was greatest in tissues of the TC and GC. Only at 24 h post-infection did tissue from the LA region respond, at which time the response was the greatest of all regions. Similar genetic networks were impacted in all regions during early phases of intramammary infection, although regional differences throughout the gland were noted. Data support an important sentinel function for the teat, as these tissues responded rapidly and intensely, with production of cytokines and antimicrobial peptides.},
  author       = {Rinaldi, Manuela and Li, Robert W and Bannerman, Douglas D and Daniels, Kristy M and Evock-Clover, Christina and Silva, Marcos VB and Paape, Max and Van Ryssen, Bernadette and Burvenich, Christian and Capuco, Anthony},
  issn         = {1438-793X},
  journal      = {FUNCTIONAL \& INTEGRATIVE GENOMICS},
  keyword      = {Microarray,Escherichia coli,qRT-PCR,Network,GROWTH-FACTOR-ALPHA,ACUTE-PHASE RESPONSE,ESCHERICHIA-COLI,GRAM-NEGATIVE BACTERIA,LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE-BINDING PROTEIN,STAPHYLOCOCCUS-AUREUS,COMPLEMENT FRAGMENT C5A,MAMMARY EPITHELIAL-CELLS,Mastitis,Dairy cow,NF-KAPPA-B,BACTERICIDAL/PERMEABILITY-INCREASING PROTEIN},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {21--38},
  title        = {A sentinel function for teat tissues in dairy cows: dominant innate immune response elements define early response to E. coli mastitis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10142-009-0133-z},
  volume       = {10},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Rinaldi, Manuela, Robert W Li, Douglas D Bannerman, Kristy M Daniels, Christina Evock-Clover, Marcos VB Silva, Max Paape, Bernadette Van Ryssen, Christian Burvenich, and Anthony Capuco. 2010. “A Sentinel Function for Teat Tissues in Dairy Cows: Dominant Innate Immune Response Elements Define Early Response to E. Coli Mastitis.” Functional & Integrative Genomics 10 (1): 21–38.
APA
Rinaldi, M., Li, R. W., Bannerman, D. D., Daniels, K. M., Evock-Clover, C., Silva, M. V., Paape, M., et al. (2010). A sentinel function for teat tissues in dairy cows: dominant innate immune response elements define early response to E. coli mastitis. FUNCTIONAL & INTEGRATIVE GENOMICS, 10(1), 21–38.
Vancouver
1.
Rinaldi M, Li RW, Bannerman DD, Daniels KM, Evock-Clover C, Silva MV, et al. A sentinel function for teat tissues in dairy cows: dominant innate immune response elements define early response to E. coli mastitis. FUNCTIONAL & INTEGRATIVE GENOMICS. 2010;10(1):21–38.
MLA
Rinaldi, Manuela, Robert W Li, Douglas D Bannerman, et al. “A Sentinel Function for Teat Tissues in Dairy Cows: Dominant Innate Immune Response Elements Define Early Response to E. Coli Mastitis.” FUNCTIONAL & INTEGRATIVE GENOMICS 10.1 (2010): 21–38. Print.