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Evolution of dispersal polymorphism and local adaptation of dispersal distance in spatially structured landscapes

Dries Bonte UGent, Thomas Hovestadt and Hans-Joachim Poethke (2010) OIKOS. 119(3). p.560-566
abstract
Many organisms show polymorphism in dispersal distance strategies. This variation is particularly ecological relevant if it encompasses a functional separation of short- (SDD) and long-distance dispersal (LDD). It remains, however, an open question whether both parts of the dispersal kernel are similarly affected by landscape related selection pressures. We implemented an individual-based model to analyze the evolution of dispersal traits in firactal landscapes that vary in the proportion of habitat and its spatial configuration. Individuals are parthenogenetic with dispersal distance determined by two alleles oil each individual's genome: one allele coding for the probability of global dispersal and one allele coding for the variance sigma of a Gaussian local dispersal with mean value zero. Simulations show that mean distances of local dispersal and the probability of global dispersal, increase with increasing habitat availability, but that changes in the habitats spatial autocorrelation impose opposing selective pressure: local dispersal distances decrease and global dispersal probabilities increase with decreasing spatial autocorrelation of the available habitat. Local adaptation of local dispersal distance emerges in landscapes with less than 70% of clumped habitat. These results demonstrate that long and short distance dispersal evolve separately according to different properties of the landscape. The landscape structure may consequently largely affect the evolution of dispersal distance strategies and the level of dispersal polymorphism.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
HABITAT FRAGMENTATION, KIN SELECTION, REDUCED DISPERSAL, CREPIS-SANCTA, WOLF SPIDER, GENE FLOW, POPULATIONS, MODELS, MIGRATION, DYNAMICS
journal title
OIKOS
Oikos
volume
119
issue
3
pages
560 - 566
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000275826200018
JCR category
ECOLOGY
JCR impact factor
3.393 (2010)
JCR rank
33/129 (2010)
JCR quartile
2 (2010)
ISSN
0030-1299
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0706.2009.17943.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
920507
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-920507
date created
2010-04-02 10:08:17
date last changed
2010-04-20 12:34:47
@article{920507,
  abstract     = {Many organisms show polymorphism in dispersal distance strategies. This variation is particularly ecological relevant if it encompasses a functional separation of short- (SDD) and long-distance dispersal (LDD). It remains, however, an open question whether both parts of the dispersal kernel are similarly affected by landscape related selection pressures.
We implemented an individual-based model to analyze the evolution of dispersal traits in firactal landscapes that vary in the proportion of habitat and its spatial configuration. Individuals are parthenogenetic with dispersal distance determined by two alleles oil each individual's genome: one allele coding for the probability of global dispersal and one allele coding for the variance sigma of a Gaussian local dispersal with mean value zero.
Simulations show that mean distances of local dispersal and the probability of global dispersal, increase with increasing habitat availability, but that changes in the habitats spatial autocorrelation impose opposing selective pressure: local dispersal distances decrease and global dispersal probabilities increase with decreasing spatial autocorrelation of the available habitat. Local adaptation of local dispersal distance emerges in landscapes with less than 70\% of clumped habitat.
These results demonstrate that long and short distance dispersal evolve separately according to different properties of the landscape. The landscape structure may consequently largely affect the evolution of dispersal distance strategies and the level of dispersal polymorphism.},
  author       = {Bonte, Dries and Hovestadt, Thomas and Poethke, Hans-Joachim},
  issn         = {0030-1299},
  journal      = {OIKOS},
  keyword      = {HABITAT FRAGMENTATION,KIN SELECTION,REDUCED DISPERSAL,CREPIS-SANCTA,WOLF SPIDER,GENE FLOW,POPULATIONS,MODELS,MIGRATION,DYNAMICS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {560--566},
  title        = {Evolution of dispersal polymorphism and local adaptation of dispersal distance in spatially structured landscapes},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1600-0706.2009.17943.x},
  volume       = {119},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Bonte, Dries, Thomas Hovestadt, and Hans-Joachim Poethke. 2010. “Evolution of Dispersal Polymorphism and Local Adaptation of Dispersal Distance in Spatially Structured Landscapes.” Oikos 119 (3): 560–566.
APA
Bonte, D., Hovestadt, T., & Poethke, H.-J. (2010). Evolution of dispersal polymorphism and local adaptation of dispersal distance in spatially structured landscapes. OIKOS, 119(3), 560–566.
Vancouver
1.
Bonte D, Hovestadt T, Poethke H-J. Evolution of dispersal polymorphism and local adaptation of dispersal distance in spatially structured landscapes. OIKOS. 2010;119(3):560–6.
MLA
Bonte, Dries, Thomas Hovestadt, and Hans-Joachim Poethke. “Evolution of Dispersal Polymorphism and Local Adaptation of Dispersal Distance in Spatially Structured Landscapes.” OIKOS 119.3 (2010): 560–566. Print.