Advanced search
1 file | 131.08 KB Add to list

Pinning the butterfly: women, blue-collar and ethnic minority MPs vis-àvis parliamentary norms and the parliamentary role of the group representative

Karen Celis (UGent) and Bram Wauters (UGent)
(2010) JOURNAL OF LEGISLATIVE STUDIES. 16(3). p.380-393
Author
Organization
Abstract
This article deals with the apparent contradiction between, on the one hand, parliaments as envisaged by neo-institutionalists as stable and stabilising institutions and, on the other hand, the societal desire to diversify political personnel and to open up political decision making processes to include group interests that were under-represented in the past. To answer the question whether and to what extent norms have changed to embrace diversity in parliament, we investigate everyday rituals, including role behaviour. Based on a focus group interview and a series of individual interviews with women, ethnic minority and blue-collar MPs in the Belgian Chamber, the article concludes that these groups are more likely to adapt themselves than to change parliamentary norms. Regarding the role of the group representative, the major finding is that it cannot be seen as a sign of parliament truly and positively embracing diversity. Moreover, it might even be interpreted as a strategy to address the request for diversity without changing existing power relations.
Keywords
class, representation, rituals, Gender, ethnic minorities, parliamentary roles

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 131.08 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Celis, Karen, and Bram Wauters. “Pinning the Butterfly: Women, Blue-collar and Ethnic Minority MPs Vis-àvis Parliamentary Norms and the Parliamentary Role of the Group Representative.” Ed. Shirin Rai & Joni Lovenduski. JOURNAL OF LEGISLATIVE STUDIES 16.3 (2010): 380–393. Print.
APA
Celis, Karen, & Wauters, B. (2010). Pinning the butterfly: women, blue-collar and ethnic minority MPs vis-àvis parliamentary norms and the parliamentary role of the group representative. (S. Rai & J. Lovenduski, Eds.)JOURNAL OF LEGISLATIVE STUDIES, 16(3), 380–393.
Chicago author-date
Celis, Karen, and Bram Wauters. 2010. “Pinning the Butterfly: Women, Blue-collar and Ethnic Minority MPs Vis-àvis Parliamentary Norms and the Parliamentary Role of the Group Representative.” Ed. Shirin Rai and Joni Lovenduski. Journal of Legislative Studies 16 (3): 380–393.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Celis, Karen, and Bram Wauters. 2010. “Pinning the Butterfly: Women, Blue-collar and Ethnic Minority MPs Vis-àvis Parliamentary Norms and the Parliamentary Role of the Group Representative.” Ed. Shirin Rai and Joni Lovenduski. Journal of Legislative Studies 16 (3): 380–393.
Vancouver
1.
Celis K, Wauters B. Pinning the butterfly: women, blue-collar and ethnic minority MPs vis-àvis parliamentary norms and the parliamentary role of the group representative. Rai S, Lovenduski J, editors. JOURNAL OF LEGISLATIVE STUDIES. 2010;16(3):380–93.
IEEE
[1]
K. Celis and B. Wauters, “Pinning the butterfly: women, blue-collar and ethnic minority MPs vis-àvis parliamentary norms and the parliamentary role of the group representative,” JOURNAL OF LEGISLATIVE STUDIES, vol. 16, no. 3, pp. 380–393, 2010.
@article{901383,
  abstract     = {This article deals with the apparent contradiction between, on the one hand, parliaments as envisaged by neo-institutionalists as stable and stabilising institutions and, on the other hand, the societal desire to diversify political personnel and to open up political decision making processes to include group interests that were under-represented in the past. To answer the question whether and to what extent norms have changed to embrace diversity in parliament, we investigate everyday rituals, including role behaviour. Based on a focus group interview and a series of individual interviews with women, ethnic minority and blue-collar MPs in the Belgian Chamber, the article concludes that these groups are more likely to adapt themselves than to change parliamentary norms. Regarding the role of the group representative, the major finding is that it cannot be seen as a sign of parliament truly and positively embracing diversity. Moreover, it might even be interpreted as a strategy to address the request for diversity without changing existing power relations.},
  author       = {Celis, Karen and Wauters, Bram},
  editor       = {Rai, Shirin and Lovenduski, Joni},
  issn         = {1357-2334},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF LEGISLATIVE STUDIES},
  keywords     = {class,representation,rituals,Gender,ethnic minorities,parliamentary roles},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {380--393},
  title        = {Pinning the butterfly: women, blue-collar and ethnic minority MPs vis-àvis parliamentary norms and the parliamentary role of the group representative},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/13572334.2010.498106},
  volume       = {16},
  year         = {2010},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric