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Institutions Under Construction: Resolving Resource Conflicts in Tanzanian Irrigation Schemes

Els Lecoutere UGent (2010) MICROCON Research Working Paper. 23. p.1-32
abstract
In present-day Tanzania, the increasing market penetration, the declining predictability of water availability and the intensifying institutional pluralism make small-scale irrigation schemes interesting for studying water governance institutions under construction. By documenting how conflicts over water are solved, we focus on how power enters this process. We also show that resource conflicts are not necessarily disruptive and that institutional pluralism can contribute to the development of more sophisticated resource governance institutions. But despite the potential of such processes to improve resource governance institutions, it can also reproduce deeply entrenched gender relations and hinder inclusion of less powerful resource users as they do not always have the capability to engage in conflict resolutions in a creative fashion.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
misc (other)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
irrigation, Africa, resource governance institutions, power
in
MICROCON Research Working Paper
volume
23
pages
32 pages
publisher
MICROCON: Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex
place of publication
Brighton
ISBN
978 1 85864 916 1
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
V
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
900529
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-900529
alternative location
http://www.microconflict.eu/publications/RWP23_EL.pdf
date created
2010-03-10 10:38:38
date last changed
2010-03-12 09:24:29
@misc{900529,
  abstract     = {In present-day Tanzania, the increasing market penetration, the declining predictability
of water availability and the intensifying institutional pluralism make small-scale irrigation
schemes interesting for studying water governance institutions under construction. By
documenting how conflicts over water are solved, we focus on how power enters this process. We
also show that resource conflicts are not necessarily disruptive and that institutional pluralism can
contribute to the development of more sophisticated resource governance institutions. But despite
the potential of such processes to improve resource governance institutions, it can also reproduce
deeply entrenched gender relations and hinder inclusion of less powerful resource users as they
do not always have the capability to engage in conflict resolutions in a creative fashion.},
  author       = {Lecoutere, Els},
  isbn         = {978 1 85864 916 1},
  keyword      = {irrigation,Africa,resource governance institutions,power},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {1--32},
  publisher    = {MICROCON: Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex},
  series       = {MICROCON Research Working Paper},
  title        = {Institutions Under Construction: Resolving Resource Conflicts in Tanzanian Irrigation Schemes},
  url          = {http://www.microconflict.eu/publications/RWP23\_EL.pdf},
  volume       = {23},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Lecoutere, Els. 2010. “Institutions Under Construction: Resolving Resource Conflicts in Tanzanian Irrigation Schemes.” MICROCON Research Working Paper. Brighton: MICROCON: Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex.
APA
Lecoutere, E. (2010). Institutions Under Construction: Resolving Resource Conflicts in Tanzanian Irrigation Schemes. MICROCON Research Working Paper. Brighton: MICROCON: Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex.
Vancouver
1.
Lecoutere E. Institutions Under Construction: Resolving Resource Conflicts in Tanzanian Irrigation Schemes. MICROCON Research Working Paper. Brighton: MICROCON: Institute of Development Studies at the University of Sussex; 2010. p. 1–32.
MLA
Lecoutere, Els. “Institutions Under Construction: Resolving Resource Conflicts in Tanzanian Irrigation Schemes.” MICROCON Research Working Paper 2010 : 1–32. Print.