Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

The effectiveness of mission statements: An explorative analysis from a communication perspective

Sebastian Desmidt UGent and Anita Prinzie UGent (2009)
abstract
Convinced that it will improve their performance, the majority of public and non-profit organizations has developed a formal mission statement. However, despite its popularity, the assumed mission statement-performance hypothesis seems to be barely analyzed nor tested (Weiss & Piderit, 1999). We addressed this issue by empirically examining the effectiveness of mission statements from an intra-organizational communication perspective and tested a theoretical rationale explaining the mission statement-performance hypothesis. The study results indicated that mission statements stimulate organizational members to engage in information conveyance and convergence processes, which prove to be positively related with the level of mission motivation. Higher levels of mission motivation, in turn, are assumed to be related with higher organizational performance.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
conference
publication status
published
subject
keyword
public organizations, communication effectiveness, Mission statement
editor
George Solomon
pages
39 pages
place of publication
Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management 2009
conference name
2009 Academy of Management Annual Meeting
conference location
Chicago, Illinios, U.S.A
conference start
2009-08-07
conference end
2009-08-11
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
C1
id
898592
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-898592
date created
2010-03-09 09:38:52
date last changed
2015-01-22 10:18:31
@inproceedings{898592,
  abstract     = {Convinced that it will improve their performance, the majority of public and non-profit organizations has developed a formal mission statement. However, despite its popularity, the assumed mission statement-performance hypothesis seems to be barely analyzed nor tested (Weiss \& Piderit, 1999). We addressed this issue by empirically examining the effectiveness of mission statements from an intra-organizational communication perspective and tested a theoretical rationale explaining the mission statement-performance hypothesis. The study results indicated that mission statements stimulate organizational members to engage in information conveyance and convergence processes, which prove to be positively related with the level of mission motivation. Higher levels of mission motivation, in turn, are assumed to be related with higher organizational performance.},
  author       = {Desmidt, Sebastian and Prinzie, Anita},
  editor       = {Solomon, George},
  keyword      = {public organizations,communication effectiveness,Mission statement},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Chicago, Illinios, U.S.A},
  pages        = {39},
  title        = {The effectiveness of mission statements: An explorative analysis from a communication perspective},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Desmidt, Sebastian, and Anita Prinzie. 2009. “The Effectiveness of Mission Statements: An Explorative Analysis from a Communication Perspective.” In , ed. George Solomon. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management 2009.
APA
Desmidt, S., & Prinzie, A. (2009). The effectiveness of mission statements: An explorative analysis from a communication perspective. In G. Solomon (Ed.), . Presented at the 2009 Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management 2009.
Vancouver
1.
Desmidt S, Prinzie A. The effectiveness of mission statements: An explorative analysis from a communication perspective. In: Solomon G, editor. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management 2009; 2009.
MLA
Desmidt, Sebastian, and Anita Prinzie. “The Effectiveness of Mission Statements: An Explorative Analysis from a Communication Perspective.” Ed. George Solomon. Proceedings of the Annual Meeting of the Academy of Management 2009, 2009. Print.