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The role of mycotoxins in pig reproduction: a review

Alain Kanora and Dominiek Maes UGent (2009) VETERINARNI MEDICINA. 54(12). p.565-576
abstract
Mycotoxins are commonly present in feed for farm animals. Sows and gilts are highly susceptible to mycotoxins. This article presents a review describing the main mycotoxins encountered in pig feed which have a negative impact on sow fertility and reproduction. Consumption of feed that is contaminated with these mycotoxins may cause a variety of symptoms, depending on the type of mycotoxin, quantity and duration of exposure, as well as the health status and condition of the animal at the time of exposure. Two types of fungi are recognized, field fungi and storage fungi. Field fungi such as Fusarium spp., Aspergillus spp. and Claviceps spp. may produce toxins that lead to disturbed reproductive performance. Storage fungi occur if the humidity during storage is too high. In daily practice, the symptoms related to mycotoxicosis can occur at toxin concentrations below the detection limit. Knowledge of the effects of mycotoxins is expanding rapidly. Mycotoxins may still be present in feedstuffs despite negative analytical findings and because of the presence of hot spots in feed and or feedstuffs. Clinical symptoms can be very pronounced, making the diagnosis for the practitioner quite easy but in many cases the symptoms are vague and not at all present at herd level on a regular basis. The practitioner is in the first line of raising awareness in all parties whenever the first indication exists of a possible mycotoxicosis problem causing reproductive failure in breeding pigs. The problems can be resolved only if all parties involved in pig herd health take the necessary preventive measures and actions. The main toxins causing reproductive failure discussed in this article are aflatoxins, ergot alkaloids, trichothecenes and zearalenone.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (review)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
aflatoxins, reproduction, ergot, T-2, mycotoxins, zearalenone, storage fungi, PREPUBERTAL CONSUMPTION, ALPHA-ZEARALENOL, FUSARIUM-ROSEUM, EARLY-PREGNANCY, MATURE GILTS, GROWING PIGS, FEMALE PIGS, T-2 TOXIN, SWINE, DEOXYNIVALENOL
journal title
VETERINARNI MEDICINA
Vet. Med.
volume
54
issue
12
pages
565 - 576
Web of Science type
Review
Web of Science id
000274116600001
JCR category
VETERINARY SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
0.644 (2009)
JCR rank
77/141 (2009)
JCR quartile
3 (2009)
ISSN
0375-8427
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have retained and own the full copyright for this publication
id
890458
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-890458
alternative location
http://vri.cz/docs/vetmed/54-12-565.pdf
date created
2010-03-04 14:08:49
date last changed
2010-04-01 11:36:52
@article{890458,
  abstract     = {Mycotoxins are commonly present in feed for farm animals. Sows and gilts are highly susceptible to mycotoxins. This article presents a review describing the main mycotoxins encountered in pig feed which have a negative impact on sow fertility and reproduction. Consumption of feed that is contaminated with these mycotoxins may cause a variety of symptoms, depending on the type of mycotoxin, quantity and duration of exposure, as well as the health status and condition of the animal at the time of exposure. Two types of fungi are recognized, field fungi and storage fungi. Field fungi such as Fusarium spp., Aspergillus spp. and Claviceps spp. may produce toxins that lead to disturbed reproductive performance. Storage fungi occur if the humidity during storage is too high. In daily practice, the symptoms related to mycotoxicosis can occur at toxin concentrations below the detection limit. Knowledge of the effects of mycotoxins is expanding rapidly. Mycotoxins may still be present in feedstuffs despite negative analytical findings and because of the presence of hot spots in feed and or feedstuffs. Clinical symptoms can be very pronounced, making the diagnosis for the practitioner quite easy but in many cases the symptoms are vague and not at all present at herd level on a regular basis. The practitioner is in the first line of raising awareness in all parties whenever the first indication exists of a possible mycotoxicosis problem causing reproductive failure in breeding pigs. The problems can be resolved only if all parties involved in pig herd health take the necessary preventive measures and actions. The main toxins causing reproductive failure discussed in this article are aflatoxins, ergot alkaloids, trichothecenes and zearalenone.},
  author       = {Kanora, Alain and Maes, Dominiek},
  issn         = {0375-8427},
  journal      = {VETERINARNI MEDICINA},
  keyword      = {aflatoxins,reproduction,ergot,T-2,mycotoxins,zearalenone,storage fungi,PREPUBERTAL CONSUMPTION,ALPHA-ZEARALENOL,FUSARIUM-ROSEUM,EARLY-PREGNANCY,MATURE GILTS,GROWING PIGS,FEMALE PIGS,T-2 TOXIN,SWINE,DEOXYNIVALENOL},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {565--576},
  title        = {The role of mycotoxins in pig reproduction: a review},
  url          = {http://vri.cz/docs/vetmed/54-12-565.pdf},
  volume       = {54},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Kanora, Alain, and Dominiek Maes. 2009. “The Role of Mycotoxins in Pig Reproduction: a Review.” Veterinarni Medicina 54 (12): 565–576.
APA
Kanora, A., & Maes, D. (2009). The role of mycotoxins in pig reproduction: a review. VETERINARNI MEDICINA, 54(12), 565–576.
Vancouver
1.
Kanora A, Maes D. The role of mycotoxins in pig reproduction: a review. VETERINARNI MEDICINA. 2009;54(12):565–76.
MLA
Kanora, Alain, and Dominiek Maes. “The Role of Mycotoxins in Pig Reproduction: a Review.” VETERINARNI MEDICINA 54.12 (2009): 565–576. Print.