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Peroxisomes in mice fed a diet supplemented with low doses of fish oil

(1995) LIPIDS. 30(8). p.701-705
Author
Organization
Abstract
The influence of low dietary doses (0.1 and 0.8% w/w) Oi a commercial fish oil preparation on peroxisomes in normal mice was studied and compared to the known strong inductive effects of high (10%) fish oil diets. Low fish oil doses were chosen to supply the mice with a concentration of docosahexaenoic acid, which was beneficial to patients with a peroxisomal disease. Peroxisomes were evaluated by cytochemical, morphometric, and enzymological techniques. The 0.1% fish oil diet had no effect on peroxisomes in liver, heart, and kidney even after prolonged treatment. The 0.8% diet did not change the peroxisomal number nor the catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) activity in the liver. Hepatic peroxisomal beta-oxidation, however, was increased by 50% after 14 d. This was accompanied by reduced peroxisomal size. The 0.8% diet also caused a small increase (+25%) in myocardial catalase activity. No effect was observed in kidneys. Our results indicate that in mice a low (<0.8%) dietary fish oil dose has no or only a slight effect on hepatic per oxisomal beta-oxidation. This may be of particular interest to patients with a peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation defect and who display a severe deficiency of docosahexaenoic acid-diets supplemented with low fish oil doses will improve the docosahexaenoic acid level without adding a strong load to the disturbed fatty acid metabolism.
Keywords
RAT-LIVER, DISORDERS, DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID, POLYUNSATURATED FATTY-ACIDS, BETA-OXIDATION, CLOFIBRATE, DRUG

Citation

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MLA
Van den Branden, Christiane, Dirk De Craemer, Marina Pauwels, et al. “Peroxisomes in Mice Fed a Diet Supplemented with Low Doses of Fish Oil.” LIPIDS 30.8 (1995): 701–705. Print.
APA
Van den Branden, Christiane, De Craemer, D., Pauwels, M., & Vamecq, J. (1995). Peroxisomes in mice fed a diet supplemented with low doses of fish oil. LIPIDS, 30(8), 701–705.
Chicago author-date
Van den Branden, Christiane, Dirk De Craemer, Marina Pauwels, and J Vamecq. 1995. “Peroxisomes in Mice Fed a Diet Supplemented with Low Doses of Fish Oil.” Lipids 30 (8): 701–705.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Van den Branden, Christiane, Dirk De Craemer, Marina Pauwels, and J Vamecq. 1995. “Peroxisomes in Mice Fed a Diet Supplemented with Low Doses of Fish Oil.” Lipids 30 (8): 701–705.
Vancouver
1.
Van den Branden C, De Craemer D, Pauwels M, Vamecq J. Peroxisomes in mice fed a diet supplemented with low doses of fish oil. LIPIDS. 1995;30(8):701–5.
IEEE
[1]
C. Van den Branden, D. De Craemer, M. Pauwels, and J. Vamecq, “Peroxisomes in mice fed a diet supplemented with low doses of fish oil,” LIPIDS, vol. 30, no. 8, pp. 701–705, 1995.
@article{887204,
  abstract     = {The influence of low dietary doses (0.1 and 0.8% w/w) Oi a commercial fish oil preparation on peroxisomes in normal mice was studied and compared to the known strong inductive effects of high (10%) fish oil diets. Low fish oil doses were chosen to supply the mice with a concentration of docosahexaenoic acid, which was beneficial to patients with a peroxisomal disease. Peroxisomes were evaluated by cytochemical, morphometric, and enzymological techniques. The 0.1% fish oil diet had no effect on peroxisomes in liver, heart, and kidney even after prolonged treatment. The 0.8% diet did not change the peroxisomal number nor the catalase (EC 1.11.1.6) activity in the liver. Hepatic peroxisomal beta-oxidation, however, was increased by 50% after 14 d. This was accompanied by reduced peroxisomal size. The 0.8% diet also caused a small increase (+25%) in myocardial catalase activity. No effect was observed in kidneys. Our results indicate that in mice a low (<0.8%) dietary fish oil dose has no or only a slight effect on hepatic per oxisomal beta-oxidation. This may be of particular interest to patients with a peroxisomal fatty acid beta-oxidation defect and who display a severe deficiency of docosahexaenoic acid-diets supplemented with low fish oil doses will improve the docosahexaenoic acid level without adding a strong load to the disturbed fatty acid metabolism.},
  author       = {Van den Branden, Christiane and De Craemer, Dirk and Pauwels, Marina and Vamecq, J},
  issn         = {0024-4201},
  journal      = {LIPIDS},
  keywords     = {RAT-LIVER,DISORDERS,DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID,POLYUNSATURATED FATTY-ACIDS,BETA-OXIDATION,CLOFIBRATE,DRUG},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {701--705},
  title        = {Peroxisomes in mice fed a diet supplemented with low doses of fish oil},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/BF02537795},
  volume       = {30},
  year         = {1995},
}

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