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Education as invitation to speak: on the teacher who does not speak

Nancy Vansieleghem UGent and Jan Masschelein (2012) JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION. 46(1). p.85-99
abstract
As a response to Le Fils, a film directed by the Dardenne brothers (), we explore the idea of speaking as an invitation and juxtapose it against ideas of speaking as a transactional, calculative, calibrated, activity. Speaking tends to be understood as a relatively straightforward matter: as a means of communication structured by such values as the reciprocal balancing of rights and obligations, of clear communication of information, of the gaining of insight into what is happening. Speaking, then, is a means by which we explain, prove or pass judgement on something. Understood this way, it is easily associated with ideas of empowerment or of the mediation of information: one directs or commits oneself to a (shared) orientationfor example to what Jurgen Habermas refers to as communicative reason. It presupposes a particular attitude of the subject; speaking that addresses the listener and the speaker herself in the name of an orientation or particular expertise to which access is claimed. In this article, by contrast, we would like to explore a different avenue of thought whereby speaking appears rather as an abandoning or exposing of oneself. It is less an activity than a passivity or passion, through which one becomes present in the present, which is at once also a kind of invitation. In exploring this form of speaking, we take up some ideas of Martin Buber. Our discussion relates speaking to being inspiring and being inspired, revealing in the process the way that to be inspiring is at the same time to be inspired. Speaking as invitation, we conclude, is what education is about.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
DIALOGUE
journal title
JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION
J. Philos. Educ.
volume
46
issue
1
pages
85 - 99
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000300685200008
JCR category
HISTORY OF SOCIAL SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
0.446 (2012)
JCR rank
16/33 (2012)
JCR quartile
2 (2012)
ISSN
0309-8249
DOI
10.1111/j.1467-9752.2012.00840.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
884807
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-884807
date created
2010-03-01 09:14:07
date last changed
2012-10-02 12:02:39
@article{884807,
  abstract     = {As a response to Le Fils, a film directed by the Dardenne brothers (), we explore the idea of speaking as an invitation and juxtapose it against ideas of speaking as a transactional, calculative, calibrated, activity. Speaking tends to be understood as a relatively straightforward matter: as a means of communication structured by such values as the reciprocal balancing of rights and obligations, of clear communication of information, of the gaining of insight into what is happening. Speaking, then, is a means by which we explain, prove or pass judgement on something. Understood this way, it is easily associated with ideas of empowerment or of the mediation of information: one directs or commits oneself to a (shared) orientationfor example to what Jurgen Habermas refers to as communicative reason. It presupposes a particular attitude of the subject; speaking that addresses the listener and the speaker herself in the name of an orientation or particular expertise to which access is claimed. In this article, by contrast, we would like to explore a different avenue of thought whereby speaking appears rather as an abandoning or exposing of oneself. It is less an activity than a passivity or passion, through which one becomes present in the present, which is at once also a kind of invitation. In exploring this form of speaking, we take up some ideas of Martin Buber. Our discussion relates speaking to being inspiring and being inspired, revealing in the process the way that to be inspiring is at the same time to be inspired. Speaking as invitation, we conclude, is what education is about.},
  author       = {Vansieleghem, Nancy and Masschelein, Jan },
  issn         = {0309-8249},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION},
  keyword      = {DIALOGUE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {85--99},
  title        = {Education as invitation to speak: on the teacher who does not speak},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9752.2012.00840.x},
  volume       = {46},
  year         = {2012},
}

Chicago
Vansieleghem, Nancy, and Jan Masschelein. 2012. “Education as Invitation to Speak: On the Teacher Who Does Not Speak.” Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (1): 85–99.
APA
Vansieleghem, N., & Masschelein, J. (2012). Education as invitation to speak: on the teacher who does not speak. JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION, 46(1), 85–99.
Vancouver
1.
Vansieleghem N, Masschelein J. Education as invitation to speak: on the teacher who does not speak. JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION. 2012;46(1):85–99.
MLA
Vansieleghem, Nancy, and Jan Masschelein. “Education as Invitation to Speak: On the Teacher Who Does Not Speak.” JOURNAL OF PHILOSOPHY OF EDUCATION 46.1 (2012): 85–99. Print.