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Increasing the Difficulty of Response Selection Does Not Increase the Switch Cost

Baptist Liefooghe UGent and Frederick Verbruggen UGent (2009) CANADIAN JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-REVUE CANADIENNE DE PSYCHOLOGIE EXPERIMENTALE. 63(4). p.323-327
abstract
Theories on task switching often distinguish within-task processes from between-task processes, and assume that only between-task processes contribute to task-switch costs. This conclusion is based mainly on the finding that stimulus-identification manipulations have no influence on the size of the switch cost. The present study tested if this equally holds for response selection, a within-task process that has been frequently attributed an important role in task switching. We manipulated the difficulty of response selection by using a semantically based response-side effect associated with numerical judgment tasks, namely the SNARC effect. In two experiments, we observed a SNARC effect and a switch cost, but no interaction between the two. We conclude that while response selection may trigger between-task processes that contribute to the size of the switch cost, response selection in itself does not do so.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
keyword
EXECUTIVE CONTROL, TASK-SET SELECTION, COGNITIVE CONTROL, MEMORY RETRIEVAL, FUNCTIONAL LOCUS, INHIBITION, WORKING-MEMORY, INTERFERENCE
journal title
CANADIAN JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-REVUE CANADIENNE DE PSYCHOLOGIE EXPERIMENTALE
Can. J. Exp. Psychol.-Rev. Can. Psychol. Exp.
volume
63
issue
4
pages
5 pages
publisher
CANADIAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC
place of publication
OTTAWA
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000273121200008
JCR category
PSYCHOLOGY, EXPERIMENTAL
JCR impact factor
1.569 (2009)
JCR rank
46/71 (2009)
JCR quartile
3 (2009)
ISSN
1196-1961
DOI
10.1037/a0016725
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
884516
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-884516
date created
2010-02-28 17:05:55
date last changed
2015-06-17 11:22:59
@article{884516,
  abstract     = {Theories on task switching often distinguish within-task processes from between-task processes, and assume that only between-task processes contribute to task-switch costs. This conclusion is based mainly on the finding that stimulus-identification manipulations have no influence on the size of the switch cost.   The present study tested if this equally holds for response selection, a within-task process that has been frequently attributed an important role in task switching. We manipulated the difficulty of response selection by using a semantically based response-side effect associated with numerical judgment tasks, namely the SNARC effect.  In two experiments, we observed a SNARC effect and a switch cost, but no interaction between the two. We conclude that while response selection may trigger between-task processes that contribute to the size of the switch cost, response selection in itself does not do so.},
  author       = {Liefooghe, Baptist and Verbruggen, Frederick},
  issn         = {1196-1961},
  journal      = {CANADIAN JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-REVUE CANADIENNE DE PSYCHOLOGIE EXPERIMENTALE},
  keyword      = {EXECUTIVE CONTROL,TASK-SET SELECTION,COGNITIVE CONTROL,MEMORY RETRIEVAL,FUNCTIONAL LOCUS,INHIBITION,WORKING-MEMORY,INTERFERENCE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {323--327},
  publisher    = {CANADIAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC},
  title        = {Increasing the Difficulty of Response Selection Does Not Increase the Switch Cost},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0016725},
  volume       = {63},
  year         = {2009},
}

Chicago
Liefooghe, Baptist, and Frederick Verbruggen. 2009. “Increasing the Difficulty of Response Selection Does Not Increase the Switch Cost.” Canadian Journal of Experimental Psychology-revue Canadienne De Psychologie Experimentale 63 (4): 323–327.
APA
Liefooghe, B., & Verbruggen, F. (2009). Increasing the Difficulty of Response Selection Does Not Increase the Switch Cost. CANADIAN JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-REVUE CANADIENNE DE PSYCHOLOGIE EXPERIMENTALE, 63(4), 323–327.
Vancouver
1.
Liefooghe B, Verbruggen F. Increasing the Difficulty of Response Selection Does Not Increase the Switch Cost. CANADIAN JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-REVUE CANADIENNE DE PSYCHOLOGIE EXPERIMENTALE. OTTAWA: CANADIAN PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSOC; 2009;63(4):323–7.
MLA
Liefooghe, Baptist, and Frederick Verbruggen. “Increasing the Difficulty of Response Selection Does Not Increase the Switch Cost.” CANADIAN JOURNAL OF EXPERIMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY-REVUE CANADIENNE DE PSYCHOLOGIE EXPERIMENTALE 63.4 (2009): 323–327. Print.