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Interpreter-mediated police interviewing cum drafting : interpreters' access to and handling of the written record

Sofie Verliefde (UGent)
(2022)
Author
Promoter
(UGent) and (UGent)
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Project
Abstract
In the Belgian judicial system, written police records are documents of paramount importance. They constitute the textual representation of interviewees’ statements and are further along in the criminal law process treated as actual representations of the interaction during the police interview. Although text drafting is commonly the sole responsibility of the recording police officers and usually performed in silence, in some cases, interpreters are granted access to the text of the written record while it is being drafted. Interpreters’ text access may be achieved in various ways: through police officers’ computer screens or through police officers reading aloud while typing or what they just have typed. Decisions interpreters make on handling their text access are bound to have an impact on the final text of the written record. This dissertation aims at describing various ways in which interpreters are granted text access and at analysing how interpreters handle their text access. When having text access, interpreters may decide to transfer their text access to interviewees by sight translating from the police officer’s computer screen or by rendering the police officer’s reading turns. Granting interviewees access to the text of the written record enables them to negotiate both content and wording of that written record. It may allow them to detect errors and solve problems, which may improve the quality and accuracy of the written record. Interpreters however do not always transfer their text access to interviewees. Interpreters’ text access to the computer screen is not often transferred to interviewees, as interpreters seem reluctant to use the text on the screen as a source to initiate sight translation sequences. When text access is explicitly granted by police officers reading aloud when typing, interpreters are expected to render these reading or typing aloud turns, making the content of these turns available to interviewees, allowing the latter to negotiate the content and wording of the text. Interpreters however do not always render these turns and are seen to involve themselves in the text negotiation and production process. Failure to render these turns however denies the interviewee the opportunity to negotiate the text, which may be detrimental to their case. Interpreters’ decisions on how to handle their text access thus have a significant influence on the text drafting process.
Keywords
Interpreter-mediated police interviews, written record, entextualisation, dialogue interpreting

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Verliefde, Sofie. Interpreter-Mediated Police Interviewing Cum Drafting : Interpreters’ Access to and Handling of the Written Record. Ghent University. Faculty of Arts and Philosophy, 2022.
APA
Verliefde, S. (2022). Interpreter-mediated police interviewing cum drafting : interpreters’ access to and handling of the written record. Ghent University. Faculty of Arts and Philosophy, Ghent, Belgium.
Chicago author-date
Verliefde, Sofie. 2022. “Interpreter-Mediated Police Interviewing Cum Drafting : Interpreters’ Access to and Handling of the Written Record.” Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Arts and Philosophy.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Verliefde, Sofie. 2022. “Interpreter-Mediated Police Interviewing Cum Drafting : Interpreters’ Access to and Handling of the Written Record.” Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Arts and Philosophy.
Vancouver
1.
Verliefde S. Interpreter-mediated police interviewing cum drafting : interpreters’ access to and handling of the written record. [Ghent, Belgium]: Ghent University. Faculty of Arts and Philosophy; 2022.
IEEE
[1]
S. Verliefde, “Interpreter-mediated police interviewing cum drafting : interpreters’ access to and handling of the written record,” Ghent University. Faculty of Arts and Philosophy, Ghent, Belgium, 2022.
@phdthesis{8773014,
  abstract     = {{In the Belgian judicial system, written police records are documents of paramount
importance. They constitute the textual representation of interviewees’ statements and
are further along in the criminal law process treated as actual representations of the
interaction during the police interview. Although text drafting is commonly the sole
responsibility of the recording police officers and usually performed in silence, in some
cases, interpreters are granted access to the text of the written record while it is being
drafted. Interpreters’ text access may be achieved in various ways: through police
officers’ computer screens or through police officers reading aloud while typing or what
they just have typed. Decisions interpreters make on handling their text access are bound
to have an impact on the final text of the written record. This dissertation aims at
describing various ways in which interpreters are granted text access and at analysing
how interpreters handle their text access. When having text access, interpreters may
decide to transfer their text access to interviewees by sight translating from the police
officer’s computer screen or by rendering the police officer’s reading turns. Granting
interviewees access to the text of the written record enables them to negotiate both
content and wording of that written record. It may allow them to detect errors and solve
problems, which may improve the quality and accuracy of the written record.
Interpreters however do not always transfer their text access to interviewees.
Interpreters’ text access to the computer screen is not often transferred to interviewees,
as interpreters seem reluctant to use the text on the screen as a source to initiate sight
translation sequences. When text access is explicitly granted by police officers reading
aloud when typing, interpreters are expected to render these reading or typing aloud
turns, making the content of these turns available to interviewees, allowing the latter to
negotiate the content and wording of the text. Interpreters however do not always render
these turns and are seen to involve themselves in the text negotiation and production
process. Failure to render these turns however denies the interviewee the opportunity to
negotiate the text, which may be detrimental to their case. Interpreters’ decisions on how
to handle their text access thus have a significant influence on the text drafting process.}},
  author       = {{Verliefde, Sofie}},
  keywords     = {{Interpreter-mediated police interviews,written record,entextualisation,dialogue interpreting}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{XXII, 219}},
  publisher    = {{Ghent University. Faculty of Arts and Philosophy}},
  school       = {{Ghent University}},
  title        = {{Interpreter-mediated police interviewing cum drafting : interpreters' access to and handling of the written record}},
  year         = {{2022}},
}