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Effect of Body Mass Index on Early and Late Mortality After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

(2010) ANNALS OF THORACIC SURGERY. 89(1). p.30-37
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Organization
Abstract
Abstract: Background. The effect of obesity on the long-term outcome after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) remains controversial. We analyzed data of patients undergoing CABG in a single center, to determine the predictive value of body mass index in combination with comorbidities on early and late mortality. Methods. Early and late mortality of consecutive patients undergoing isolated CABG from January 1998 until December 2007 were determined. Patients were classified into five groups according to preoperative body mass index: underweight, normal weight, overweight, obese, and morbidly obese. Results. After excluding 122 patients who were lost to follow-up and 236 patients with missing preoperative body mass index, 10,268 patients were studied. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that underweight was associated with higher early mortality (hazard ratio 2.63; 95% confidence interval: 1.13 to 6.11, p = 0.025). Multivariate Cox regression analyses did reveal morbid obesity as an independent predictor of late mortality (hazard ratio 1.67, 95% confidence interval: 1.15 to 2.43, p = 0.007). Conclusions. Among patients undergoing isolated CABG, underweight is an independent predictor for early mortality, and morbid obesity is an independent predictor for late mortality. (Ann Thorac Surg 2010; 89: 30-7) (C) 2010 by The Society of Thoracic Surgeons
Keywords
LONG-TERM OUTCOMES, CARDIAC-SURGERY, RISK-FACTOR, ADVERSE OUTCOMES, EXTREME OBESITY, VALVE SURGERY, IMPACT, OVERWEIGHT, SIZE, MORBIDITY

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MLA
van Straten, AHM et al. “Effect of Body Mass Index on Early and Late Mortality After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting.” ANNALS OF THORACIC SURGERY 89.1 (2010): 30–37. Print.
APA
van Straten, A., Bramer, S., Hamad, M., Van Zundert, A., Martens, E., Schonberger, J., & de Wolf, A. (2010). Effect of Body Mass Index on Early and Late Mortality After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting. ANNALS OF THORACIC SURGERY, 89(1), 30–37.
Chicago author-date
van Straten, AHM, S Bramer, MAS Hamad, Adrien Van Zundert, EJ Martens, JPAM Schonberger, and AM de Wolf. 2010. “Effect of Body Mass Index on Early and Late Mortality After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting.” Annals of Thoracic Surgery 89 (1): 30–37.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
van Straten, AHM, S Bramer, MAS Hamad, Adrien Van Zundert, EJ Martens, JPAM Schonberger, and AM de Wolf. 2010. “Effect of Body Mass Index on Early and Late Mortality After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting.” Annals of Thoracic Surgery 89 (1): 30–37.
Vancouver
1.
van Straten A, Bramer S, Hamad M, Van Zundert A, Martens E, Schonberger J, et al. Effect of Body Mass Index on Early and Late Mortality After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting. ANNALS OF THORACIC SURGERY. NEW YORK: ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC; 2010;89(1):30–7.
IEEE
[1]
A. van Straten et al., “Effect of Body Mass Index on Early and Late Mortality After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting,” ANNALS OF THORACIC SURGERY, vol. 89, no. 1, pp. 30–37, 2010.
@article{877185,
  abstract     = {Abstract: Background. The effect of obesity on the long-term outcome after coronary artery bypass graft surgery (CABG) remains controversial. We analyzed data of patients undergoing CABG in a single center, to determine the predictive value of body mass index in combination with comorbidities on early and late mortality.
Methods. Early and late mortality of consecutive patients undergoing isolated CABG from January 1998 until December 2007 were determined. Patients were classified into five groups according to preoperative body mass index: underweight, normal weight, overweight, obese, and morbidly obese.

Results. After excluding 122 patients who were lost to follow-up and 236 patients with missing preoperative body mass index, 10,268 patients were studied. Multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that underweight was associated with higher early mortality (hazard ratio 2.63; 95% confidence interval: 1.13 to 6.11, p = 0.025). Multivariate Cox regression analyses did reveal morbid obesity as an independent predictor of late mortality (hazard ratio 1.67, 95% confidence interval: 1.15 to 2.43, p = 0.007).

Conclusions. Among patients undergoing isolated CABG, underweight is an independent predictor for early mortality, and morbid obesity is an independent predictor for late mortality. (Ann Thorac Surg 2010; 89: 30-7) (C) 2010 by The Society of Thoracic Surgeons},
  author       = {van Straten, AHM and Bramer, S and Hamad, MAS and Van Zundert, Adrien and Martens, EJ and Schonberger, JPAM and de Wolf, AM},
  issn         = {0003-4975},
  journal      = {ANNALS OF THORACIC SURGERY},
  keywords     = {LONG-TERM OUTCOMES,CARDIAC-SURGERY,RISK-FACTOR,ADVERSE OUTCOMES,EXTREME OBESITY,VALVE SURGERY,IMPACT,OVERWEIGHT,SIZE,MORBIDITY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {30--37},
  publisher    = {ELSEVIER SCIENCE INC},
  title        = {Effect of Body Mass Index on Early and Late Mortality After Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.athoracsur.2009.09.050},
  volume       = {89},
  year         = {2010},
}

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