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Rigid body motion analysis in walk-through total body PET scanner based on real-time motion tracking with cameras : comparative study between free-breathing and breath-hold

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Abstract
Background: Total Body (TB) PET systems have become so sensitive that 30-seconds body acquisitions seem feasible. Practical patient throughput is however limited mostly by patient positioning on the bed. A new flat panel high-resolution Walk Through (WT) TB-PET design with patients in upright position was therefore proposed [1]. To investigate the extent of patient motion (which can be larger in such a design) a WT-TB-PET mock-up was built (Fig.1). Motion analyses compared the impact of freebreathing (normal) vs breath-hold induced body motion in the WT-TB-PET. Materials and Methods: The study included 15 ‘healthy’ participants. The subject wore a body-tight surf shirt (to accurately detect breathing motion at chest and abdomen), a cutting collar around the neck with two markers at the shoulders and glasses with patterns (for head motion). To estimate chest and abdominal movement information (with/without breath-hold), surface motion of a checkerboard sticker placed on the body was tracked and analysed. A 30-s ‘acquisition’ with real-time motion tracking was performed using four webcams (Fig.1). Results: Fig.2 shows that shoulder motion is negligible, while head motion is most significant and will need to be compensated for when including the brain in the field-of-view. It was observed that, on average, breath-hold reduces rigid body motions (as further exemplified by the positioning curves shown in Fig.3). Three participants had larger average motions during breath-hold than with free-breathing, suggesting difficulties in holding breath for 30s or related to variations in breath-hold techniques. Conclusions: Motion of subjects standing upright in the WT-TB-PET is limited (and largest for the head) and close to the expected spatial resolution of 2 mm. The comparative study demonstrates that a 30s breath-hold is feasible and minimizes body motion. Further testing with PET-specific patient groups will be performed to assess breath-hold techniques and potential motion compensation techniques.

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MLA
Muller, Florence Marie, et al. “Rigid Body Motion Analysis in Walk-through Total Body PET Scanner Based on Real-Time Motion Tracking with Cameras : Comparative Study between Free-Breathing and Breath-Hold.” Total-Body PET 2022, Abstracts, 2022.
APA
Muller, F. M., Maebe, J., Dadgar, M., Withofs, N., Vanhove, C., & Vandenberghe, S. (2022). Rigid body motion analysis in walk-through total body PET scanner based on real-time motion tracking with cameras : comparative study between free-breathing and breath-hold. Total-Body PET 2022, Abstracts. Presented at the Total-Body PET 2022, Edinburgh, Scotland.
Chicago author-date
Muller, Florence Marie, Jens Maebe, Meysam Dadgar, Nadia Withofs, Christian Vanhove, and Stefaan Vandenberghe. 2022. “Rigid Body Motion Analysis in Walk-through Total Body PET Scanner Based on Real-Time Motion Tracking with Cameras : Comparative Study between Free-Breathing and Breath-Hold.” In Total-Body PET 2022, Abstracts.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Muller, Florence Marie, Jens Maebe, Meysam Dadgar, Nadia Withofs, Christian Vanhove, and Stefaan Vandenberghe. 2022. “Rigid Body Motion Analysis in Walk-through Total Body PET Scanner Based on Real-Time Motion Tracking with Cameras : Comparative Study between Free-Breathing and Breath-Hold.” In Total-Body PET 2022, Abstracts.
Vancouver
1.
Muller FM, Maebe J, Dadgar M, Withofs N, Vanhove C, Vandenberghe S. Rigid body motion analysis in walk-through total body PET scanner based on real-time motion tracking with cameras : comparative study between free-breathing and breath-hold. In: Total-Body PET 2022, Abstracts. 2022.
IEEE
[1]
F. M. Muller, J. Maebe, M. Dadgar, N. Withofs, C. Vanhove, and S. Vandenberghe, “Rigid body motion analysis in walk-through total body PET scanner based on real-time motion tracking with cameras : comparative study between free-breathing and breath-hold,” in Total-Body PET 2022, Abstracts, Edinburgh, Scotland, 2022.
@inproceedings{8768334,
  abstract     = {{Background: Total Body (TB) PET systems have become so sensitive that 30-seconds body acquisitions seem
feasible. Practical patient throughput is however limited mostly by patient positioning on the bed. A
new flat panel high-resolution Walk Through (WT) TB-PET design with patients in upright position
was therefore proposed [1]. To investigate the extent of patient motion (which can be larger in such a
design) a WT-TB-PET mock-up was built (Fig.1). Motion analyses compared the impact of freebreathing
(normal) vs breath-hold induced body motion in the WT-TB-PET.

Materials and Methods: The study included 15 ‘healthy’ participants. The subject wore a body-tight surf shirt (to accurately detect breathing motion at chest and abdomen), a cutting collar around the neck with two markers at
the shoulders and glasses with patterns (for head motion). To estimate chest and abdominal movement
information (with/without breath-hold), surface motion of a checkerboard sticker placed on the body
was tracked and analysed. A 30-s ‘acquisition’ with real-time motion tracking was performed using
four webcams (Fig.1).

Results: Fig.2 shows that shoulder motion is negligible, while head motion is most significant and will need to
be compensated for when including the brain in the field-of-view. It was observed that, on average,
breath-hold reduces rigid body motions (as further exemplified by the positioning curves shown in
Fig.3). Three participants had larger average motions during breath-hold than with free-breathing,
suggesting difficulties in holding breath for 30s or related to variations in breath-hold techniques.

Conclusions: Motion of subjects standing upright in the WT-TB-PET is limited (and largest for the head) and close
to the expected spatial resolution of 2 mm. The comparative study demonstrates that a 30s breath-hold
is feasible and minimizes body motion. Further testing with PET-specific patient groups will be
performed to assess breath-hold techniques and potential motion compensation techniques.}},
  author       = {{Muller, Florence Marie and Maebe, Jens and Dadgar, Meysam and Withofs, Nadia and Vanhove, Christian and Vandenberghe, Stefaan}},
  booktitle    = {{Total-Body PET 2022, Abstracts}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  location     = {{Edinburgh, Scotland}},
  pages        = {{1}},
  title        = {{Rigid body motion analysis in walk-through total body PET scanner based on real-time motion tracking with cameras : comparative study between free-breathing and breath-hold}},
  url          = {{https://totalbodypet2020org.files.wordpress.com/2022/09/online_conference_booklet_final.pdf}},
  year         = {{2022}},
}