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The use of photos to investigate ecological change

Leen Depauw (UGent) , Haben Blondeel (UGent) , Emiel De Lombaerde (UGent) , Karen De Pauw (UGent) , Dries Landuyt (UGent) , Eline Lorer (UGent) , Pieter Vangansbeke (UGent) , Thomas Vanneste (UGent) , Kris Verheyen (UGent) and Pieter De Frenne (UGent)
(2022) JOURNAL OF ECOLOGY. 110(6). p.1220-1236
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Abstract
Global change is causing ecosystems to change at unprecedented rates and the urgency to quantify ecological change is high. We therefore need all possible sources of ecological data to address key knowledge gaps. Ground-based photos are a form of remote sensing and an unconventional data source with a high potential to improve our understanding of ecological change. They can provide invaluable information on ecological conditions in the past and present at relevant spatiotemporal scales that is very difficult to obtain with other approaches. Here we review the use of ground-based photos in a set of relevant ecological research topics, such as biodiversity and community ecology, phenology, global change ecology and landscape ecology. We highlight three main photo-based methods in ecological research (repeat photography, time-lapse photography and public archives), alongside which we discuss three case studies to demonstrate novel applications of these methods, to answer fundamental ecological questions. Synthesis. Photos can significantly support ecological research to improve our understanding of biotic responses in a rapidly changing world. Photos cover relatively large temporal and spatial scales, and can provide large amounts of information with limited time investment. To exploit their full potential, we need to invest not only in technological advances to compile, process and analyse images but also in proper data management.
Keywords
GOOGLE STREET VIEW, VEGETATION CHANGE, PLANT PHENOLOGY, LAND-USE, HISTORICAL ECOLOGY, SOUTH-AFRICA, BIG DATA, FOREST, IMAGES, VIDEO, ecological change, Google Street View, ground-based photography, iEcology, plant ecology, remote sensing, repeat photography, time-lapse, photography

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Citation

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MLA
Depauw, Leen, et al. “The Use of Photos to Investigate Ecological Change.” JOURNAL OF ECOLOGY, vol. 110, no. 6, 2022, pp. 1220–36, doi:10.1111/1365-2745.13876.
APA
Depauw, L., Blondeel, H., De Lombaerde, E., De Pauw, K., Landuyt, D., Lorer, E., … De Frenne, P. (2022). The use of photos to investigate ecological change. JOURNAL OF ECOLOGY, 110(6), 1220–1236. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.13876
Chicago author-date
Depauw, Leen, Haben Blondeel, Emiel De Lombaerde, Karen De Pauw, Dries Landuyt, Eline Lorer, Pieter Vangansbeke, Thomas Vanneste, Kris Verheyen, and Pieter De Frenne. 2022. “The Use of Photos to Investigate Ecological Change.” JOURNAL OF ECOLOGY 110 (6): 1220–36. https://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.13876.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Depauw, Leen, Haben Blondeel, Emiel De Lombaerde, Karen De Pauw, Dries Landuyt, Eline Lorer, Pieter Vangansbeke, Thomas Vanneste, Kris Verheyen, and Pieter De Frenne. 2022. “The Use of Photos to Investigate Ecological Change.” JOURNAL OF ECOLOGY 110 (6): 1220–1236. doi:10.1111/1365-2745.13876.
Vancouver
1.
Depauw L, Blondeel H, De Lombaerde E, De Pauw K, Landuyt D, Lorer E, et al. The use of photos to investigate ecological change. JOURNAL OF ECOLOGY. 2022;110(6):1220–36.
IEEE
[1]
L. Depauw et al., “The use of photos to investigate ecological change,” JOURNAL OF ECOLOGY, vol. 110, no. 6, pp. 1220–1236, 2022.
@article{8765182,
  abstract     = {{Global change is causing ecosystems to change at unprecedented rates and the urgency to quantify ecological change is high. We therefore need all possible sources of ecological data to address key knowledge gaps. Ground-based photos are a form of remote sensing and an unconventional data source with a high potential to improve our understanding of ecological change. They can provide invaluable information on ecological conditions in the past and present at relevant spatiotemporal scales that is very difficult to obtain with other approaches. Here we review the use of ground-based photos in a set of relevant ecological research topics, such as biodiversity and community ecology, phenology, global change ecology and landscape ecology. We highlight three main photo-based methods in ecological research (repeat photography, time-lapse photography and public archives), alongside which we discuss three case studies to demonstrate novel applications of these methods, to answer fundamental ecological questions. Synthesis. Photos can significantly support ecological research to improve our understanding of biotic responses in a rapidly changing world. Photos cover relatively large temporal and spatial scales, and can provide large amounts of information with limited time investment. To exploit their full potential, we need to invest not only in technological advances to compile, process and analyse images but also in proper data management.}},
  author       = {{Depauw, Leen and Blondeel, Haben and De Lombaerde, Emiel and De Pauw, Karen and Landuyt, Dries and Lorer, Eline and Vangansbeke, Pieter and Vanneste, Thomas and Verheyen, Kris and De Frenne, Pieter}},
  issn         = {{0022-0477}},
  journal      = {{JOURNAL OF ECOLOGY}},
  keywords     = {{GOOGLE STREET VIEW,VEGETATION CHANGE,PLANT PHENOLOGY,LAND-USE,HISTORICAL ECOLOGY,SOUTH-AFRICA,BIG DATA,FOREST,IMAGES,VIDEO,ecological change,Google Street View,ground-based photography,iEcology,plant ecology,remote sensing,repeat photography,time-lapse,photography}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{6}},
  pages        = {{1220--1236}},
  title        = {{The use of photos to investigate ecological change}},
  url          = {{http://doi.org/10.1111/1365-2745.13876}},
  volume       = {{110}},
  year         = {{2022}},
}

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