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Trace analysis of volatile organic compounds in indoor air : uptake rate determination for passive sampling and time-resolved measurements in a university auditorium (Ghent)

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Abstract
Indoor air quality (IAQ) gains a growing awareness, mainly because people spend more than 80% of their time indoors. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) represent an important group of indoor air pollutants, as often higher concentrations (and moreover a broader range) of VOCs are measured indoors, and exposure to VOCs is related to negative health effects. Passive sampling of VOCs in air has received increasing attention in recent years because of multiple advantages (no need for electricity, longer period of sampling (chronic exposure assessment) and lower costs). However, to use passive sampling as a reliable sampling technique, a compound and sampler-specific uptake rate (UTR) is needed. Theoretical ideal UTRs may significantly underestimate VOC concentrations, but looking for experimental UTRs, there is a great lack of data in the literature. Therefore, 7-days experimental UTRs were determined by simultaneous passive and active sampling of VOCs in a university auditorium (Ghent, Belgium). Students spend often more than 40 hours a week in an auditorium, so it is an important location to investigate the IAQ. Active sampling was performed by time-resolved measurements (30 consecutive samples of 335min each) to obtain VOC concentration profiles throughout one week. Axial-sampling tube-type samplers filled with Tenax TA were exposed passively (7 samples), simultaneous to the active measurements. TVOC (n=25) concentrations ranged from 16.5 to 333 µg/m³ during the week. Ethyl acetate, 2-butanone, 1-methoxy-2-propanol, cyclohexane and tetrahydrofuran were the five most abundant VOCs. This presentation will discuss potential sources as well as links with ventilation and number of students present.
Keywords
Indoor air, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), uptake rates (UTRs), time resolved measurements

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MLA
De Coster, Gynaika, et al. “Trace Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Air : Uptake Rate Determination for Passive Sampling and Time-Resolved Measurements in a University Auditorium (Ghent).” National Symposium for Applied Biological Sciences, 26th, Abstracts, 2022.
APA
De Coster, G., Legein, J., Vandeputte, A., Verhulst, H., Vermeulen, E., De Wispelaere, P., … Walgraeve, C. (2022). Trace analysis of volatile organic compounds in indoor air : uptake rate determination for passive sampling and time-resolved measurements in a university auditorium (Ghent). National Symposium for Applied Biological Sciences, 26th, Abstracts. Presented at the 26th National Symposium for Applied Biological Sciences (NSABS 2022), Antwerp, Belgium.
Chicago author-date
De Coster, Gynaika, Justine Legein, Axelle Vandeputte, Heleen Verhulst, Elise Vermeulen, Patrick De Wispelaere, Herman Van Langenhove, Kristof Demeestere, and Christophe Walgraeve. 2022. “Trace Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Air : Uptake Rate Determination for Passive Sampling and Time-Resolved Measurements in a University Auditorium (Ghent).” In National Symposium for Applied Biological Sciences, 26th, Abstracts.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
De Coster, Gynaika, Justine Legein, Axelle Vandeputte, Heleen Verhulst, Elise Vermeulen, Patrick De Wispelaere, Herman Van Langenhove, Kristof Demeestere, and Christophe Walgraeve. 2022. “Trace Analysis of Volatile Organic Compounds in Indoor Air : Uptake Rate Determination for Passive Sampling and Time-Resolved Measurements in a University Auditorium (Ghent).” In National Symposium for Applied Biological Sciences, 26th, Abstracts.
Vancouver
1.
De Coster G, Legein J, Vandeputte A, Verhulst H, Vermeulen E, De Wispelaere P, et al. Trace analysis of volatile organic compounds in indoor air : uptake rate determination for passive sampling and time-resolved measurements in a university auditorium (Ghent). In: National Symposium for Applied Biological Sciences, 26th, Abstracts. 2022.
IEEE
[1]
G. De Coster et al., “Trace analysis of volatile organic compounds in indoor air : uptake rate determination for passive sampling and time-resolved measurements in a university auditorium (Ghent),” in National Symposium for Applied Biological Sciences, 26th, Abstracts, Antwerp, Belgium, 2022.
@inproceedings{8764488,
  abstract     = {{Indoor air quality (IAQ) gains a growing awareness, mainly because people spend more than 80% of their time indoors. Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) represent an important group of indoor air pollutants, as often higher concentrations (and moreover a broader range) of VOCs are measured indoors, and exposure to VOCs is related to negative health effects. Passive sampling of VOCs in air has received increasing attention in recent years because of multiple advantages (no need for electricity, longer period of sampling (chronic exposure assessment) and lower costs). However, to use passive sampling as a reliable sampling technique, a compound and sampler-specific uptake rate (UTR) is needed. Theoretical ideal UTRs may significantly underestimate VOC concentrations, but looking for experimental UTRs, there is a great lack of data in the literature. Therefore, 7-days experimental UTRs were determined by simultaneous passive and active sampling of VOCs in a university auditorium (Ghent, Belgium). Students spend often more than 40 hours a week in an auditorium, so it is an important location to investigate the IAQ. Active sampling was performed by time-resolved measurements (30 consecutive samples of 335min each) to obtain VOC concentration profiles throughout one week. Axial-sampling tube-type samplers filled with Tenax TA were exposed passively (7 samples), simultaneous to the active measurements. TVOC (n=25) concentrations ranged from 16.5 to 333 µg/m³ during the week. Ethyl acetate, 2-butanone, 1-methoxy-2-propanol, cyclohexane and tetrahydrofuran were the five most abundant VOCs. This presentation will discuss potential sources as well as links with ventilation and number of students present.}},
  author       = {{De Coster, Gynaika and Legein, Justine and Vandeputte, Axelle and Verhulst, Heleen and Vermeulen, Elise and De Wispelaere, Patrick and Van Langenhove, Herman and Demeestere, Kristof and Walgraeve, Christophe}},
  booktitle    = {{National Symposium for Applied Biological Sciences, 26th, Abstracts}},
  keywords     = {{Indoor air,volatile organic compounds (VOCs),uptake rates (UTRs),time resolved measurements}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  location     = {{Antwerp, Belgium}},
  title        = {{Trace analysis of volatile organic compounds in indoor air : uptake rate determination for passive sampling and time-resolved measurements in a university auditorium (Ghent)}},
  year         = {{2022}},
}