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Interpreter-mediated access to the written record in police interviews

Sofie Verliefde (UGent) and Bart Defrancq (UGent)
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Abstract
One of the main goals of the police interview is the drafting of a written record. That written record is the textual outcome of a complex negotiation process on the content and wording of what is being recorded. The interviewee's ability to negotiate content and wording is however limited when the interviewee is denied access to the text of the record. Such access may be granted through the police officer's reading out loud what he is typing while drafting. In many cases, that access does not go beyond the interpreter, as the interpreter does not always identify the police officer's reading turns as conversational turns to be interpreted. In our dataset, Belgian interpreters for Dutch are seen to involve themselves in the negotiation process instead of rendering the police officer's reading turns, repeating segments the latter failed to record or correcting information they perceive to be erroneous. Only when the interpreter decides to transfer the access to the written record granted by the police officer to the interviewee by rendering the police officer's reading turns, the interviewee is able to enter in the negotiation process on the content of the written record and able to offer confirmations, corrections or elaborations.
Keywords
Interpreter-mediated police interviews, written record, text drafting, entextualisation, TALK, TEXT

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Citation

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MLA
Verliefde, Sofie, and Bart Defrancq. “Interpreter-Mediated Access to the Written Record in Police Interviews.” PERSPECTIVES-STUDIES IN TRANSLATION THEORY AND PRACTICE, vol. 31, no. 3, 2023, pp. 519–47, doi:10.1080/0907676X.2022.2089045.
APA
Verliefde, S., & Defrancq, B. (2023). Interpreter-mediated access to the written record in police interviews. PERSPECTIVES-STUDIES IN TRANSLATION THEORY AND PRACTICE, 31(3), 519–547. https://doi.org/10.1080/0907676X.2022.2089045
Chicago author-date
Verliefde, Sofie, and Bart Defrancq. 2023. “Interpreter-Mediated Access to the Written Record in Police Interviews.” PERSPECTIVES-STUDIES IN TRANSLATION THEORY AND PRACTICE 31 (3): 519–47. https://doi.org/10.1080/0907676X.2022.2089045.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Verliefde, Sofie, and Bart Defrancq. 2023. “Interpreter-Mediated Access to the Written Record in Police Interviews.” PERSPECTIVES-STUDIES IN TRANSLATION THEORY AND PRACTICE 31 (3): 519–547. doi:10.1080/0907676X.2022.2089045.
Vancouver
1.
Verliefde S, Defrancq B. Interpreter-mediated access to the written record in police interviews. PERSPECTIVES-STUDIES IN TRANSLATION THEORY AND PRACTICE. 2023;31(3):519–47.
IEEE
[1]
S. Verliefde and B. Defrancq, “Interpreter-mediated access to the written record in police interviews,” PERSPECTIVES-STUDIES IN TRANSLATION THEORY AND PRACTICE, vol. 31, no. 3, pp. 519–547, 2023.
@article{8756840,
  abstract     = {{One of the main goals of the police interview is the drafting of a written record. That written record is the textual outcome of a complex negotiation process on the content and wording of what is being recorded. The interviewee's ability to negotiate content and wording is however limited when the interviewee is denied access to the text of the record. Such access may be granted through the police officer's reading out loud what he is typing while drafting. In many cases, that access does not go beyond the interpreter, as the interpreter does not always identify the police officer's reading turns as conversational turns to be interpreted. In our dataset, Belgian interpreters for Dutch are seen to involve themselves in the negotiation process instead of rendering the police officer's reading turns, repeating segments the latter failed to record or correcting information they perceive to be erroneous. Only when the interpreter decides to transfer the access to the written record granted by the police officer to the interviewee by rendering the police officer's reading turns, the interviewee is able to enter in the negotiation process on the content of the written record and able to offer confirmations, corrections or elaborations.}},
  author       = {{Verliefde, Sofie and Defrancq, Bart}},
  issn         = {{0907-676X}},
  journal      = {{PERSPECTIVES-STUDIES IN TRANSLATION THEORY AND PRACTICE}},
  keywords     = {{Interpreter-mediated police interviews,written record,text drafting,entextualisation,TALK,TEXT}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{3}},
  pages        = {{519--547}},
  title        = {{Interpreter-mediated access to the written record in police interviews}},
  url          = {{http://doi.org/10.1080/0907676X.2022.2089045}},
  volume       = {{31}},
  year         = {{2023}},
}

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