Advanced search
2 files | 893.34 KB Add to list

Living up to a bohemian work ethic : balancing autonomy and risk in the symbolic economy of the performing arts

(2022) POETICS. 93(part B).
Author
Organization
Project
Abstract
Empirical studies generally report that aspiring a career in the performing arts is risky business. Within the contemporary European context of neoliberal capitalism, the particular workforce is inclined to occupy a precarious socio-economic position. We aim to contribute to this body of research by discussing how risk and precarity in the artworld are macro- and meso-governed by existing structures and micro-managed by agents. Our data stem from empirical research conducted among members of the contemporary dance population in Brussels and Berlin. We focus for the most part on qualitative findings from longitudinal ethnographic fieldwork to discuss how the informants live up to a bohemian work ethic that is framed by a more general symbolic economy. In this paper, we argue that within the longstanding sociological agency-structure debate, the outlined bohemian work ethic ties in with the concept of an autonomous heteronomy. Furthermore, despite the relatively different socio-economic macro structures in both locales, we come to conclude that the very similar symbolic economy seems to have a much greater impact on artistic and economic risk taking than the specific social security policy and welfare approaches.
Keywords
work ethic, contemporary dance, bohemian, cultural production, artistic labor, Brussels, Berlin, Precarity, Symbolic capital, ARTISTS

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text (Accepted manuscript)
    • |
    • UGent only (changes to open access on 2023-09-01)
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 440.33 KB
  • (...).pdf
    • full text (Published version)
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 453.01 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Van Assche, Annelies, and Rudi Laermans. “Living up to a Bohemian Work Ethic : Balancing Autonomy and Risk in the Symbolic Economy of the Performing Arts.” POETICS, vol. 93, no. part B, 2022, doi:10.1016/j.poetic.2022.101683.
APA
Van Assche, A., & Laermans, R. (2022). Living up to a bohemian work ethic : balancing autonomy and risk in the symbolic economy of the performing arts. POETICS, 93(part B). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.poetic.2022.101683
Chicago author-date
Van Assche, Annelies, and Rudi Laermans. 2022. “Living up to a Bohemian Work Ethic : Balancing Autonomy and Risk in the Symbolic Economy of the Performing Arts.” POETICS 93 (part B). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.poetic.2022.101683.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Van Assche, Annelies, and Rudi Laermans. 2022. “Living up to a Bohemian Work Ethic : Balancing Autonomy and Risk in the Symbolic Economy of the Performing Arts.” POETICS 93 (part B). doi:10.1016/j.poetic.2022.101683.
Vancouver
1.
Van Assche A, Laermans R. Living up to a bohemian work ethic : balancing autonomy and risk in the symbolic economy of the performing arts. POETICS. 2022;93(part B).
IEEE
[1]
A. Van Assche and R. Laermans, “Living up to a bohemian work ethic : balancing autonomy and risk in the symbolic economy of the performing arts,” POETICS, vol. 93, no. part B, 2022.
@article{8754060,
  abstract     = {{Empirical studies generally report that aspiring a career in the performing arts is risky business. Within the contemporary European context of neoliberal capitalism, the particular workforce is inclined to occupy a precarious socio-economic position. We aim to contribute to this body of research by discussing how risk and precarity in the artworld are macro- and meso-governed by existing structures and micro-managed by agents. Our data stem from empirical research conducted among members of the contemporary dance population in Brussels and Berlin. We focus for the most part on qualitative findings from longitudinal ethnographic fieldwork to discuss how the informants live up to a bohemian work ethic that is framed by a more general symbolic economy. In this paper, we argue that within the longstanding sociological agency-structure debate, the outlined bohemian work ethic ties in with the concept of an autonomous heteronomy. Furthermore, despite the relatively different socio-economic macro structures in both locales, we come to conclude that the very similar symbolic economy seems to have a much greater impact on artistic and economic risk taking than the specific social security policy and welfare approaches.}},
  articleno    = {{101683}},
  author       = {{Van Assche, Annelies and Laermans, Rudi}},
  issn         = {{0304-422X}},
  journal      = {{POETICS}},
  keywords     = {{work ethic,contemporary dance,bohemian,cultural production,artistic labor,Brussels,Berlin,Precarity,Symbolic capital,ARTISTS}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{part B}},
  pages        = {{10}},
  title        = {{Living up to a bohemian work ethic : balancing autonomy and risk in the symbolic economy of the performing arts}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.poetic.2022.101683}},
  volume       = {{93}},
  year         = {{2022}},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: