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Haemorrhagic diathesis in neonatal calves: an emerging syndrome in Europe

Bart Pardon UGent, Lennert Steukers UGent, Jan Dierick, Richard Ducatelle UGent, Veronique Saey UGent, Sofie Maes, Griet Vercauteren UGent, Kris De Clercq, Jozefien Callens and Koen De Bleecker, et al. (2010) TRANSBOUNDARY AND EMERGING DISEASES. 57(3). p.135-146
abstract
In 2008 and 2009 a large number of cases of haemorrhagic diathesis (HD) in neonatal calves were reported in different European countries. In Flanders, 84 cases of neonatal HD in 30 herds were reported in this period. The disease typically affects calves younger than 1 month old from different breed and gender. Prominent clinical signs are cutaneous bleeding, petechiae on all mucosae, melena and often high fever. Early in the disease, the mental state of the animals is uncompromised. The typical haematological finding is pancytopenia, with severe to complete thrombocytopenia being the cause of the increased susceptibility to bleeding. In seven of the affected herds blood samples of calves of the same age group as the clinical case were collected and on six of those farms at least one subclinical case could be identified. Necropsy findings were generalized petechiae, ecchymoses or haemorrhages and variable lymphadenopathy. Histopathology of haemorrhagic lesions revealed multifocal extravasation of red blood cells (haemorrhage) with preservation of tissue architecture and absence of other abnormalities. Total bone marrow aplasia and depletion of all lymphoid tissue was the most prominent finding on histology. Activated macrophages and haemophagocytosis were seen on bone marrow cytology from two live calves. Polymerase chain reaction for bovine viral diarrhoea virus, bluetongue and epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus was negative. Several attempts to isolate a viral agent were unsuccessful.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
calves, haemorrhagic diathesis, pancytopenia, bone marrow aplasia, neonatal, bleeding, VIRAL-DIARRHEA-VIRUS, BONE-MARROW APLASIA, BEEF-CALVES, PANCYTOPENIA, THROMBOCYTOPENIA, CIRCOVIRUS, ANEMIA, CATTLE, PARVOVIRUS-B19, DEFICIENCY
journal title
TRANSBOUNDARY AND EMERGING DISEASES
Transbound. Emerg. Dis.
volume
57
issue
3
pages
135 - 146
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000277607400002
JCR category
VETERINARY SCIENCES
JCR impact factor
2.448 (2010)
JCR rank
7/145 (2010)
JCR quartile
1 (2010)
ISSN
1865-1674
DOI
10.1111/j.1865-1682.2010.01098.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
875351
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-875351
date created
2010-02-23 09:46:12
date last changed
2011-07-07 11:06:17
@article{875351,
  abstract     = {In 2008 and 2009 a large number of cases of haemorrhagic diathesis (HD) in neonatal calves were reported in different European countries. In Flanders, 84 cases of neonatal HD in 30 herds were reported in this period. The disease typically affects calves younger than 1 month old from different breed and gender.
Prominent clinical signs are cutaneous bleeding, petechiae on all mucosae, melena and often high fever. Early in the disease, the mental state of the animals is uncompromised. The typical haematological finding is pancytopenia, with severe to complete thrombocytopenia being the cause of the increased susceptibility to bleeding. In seven of the affected herds blood samples of calves of the same age group as the clinical case were collected and on six of those farms at least one subclinical case could be identified. Necropsy findings were generalized petechiae, ecchymoses or haemorrhages and variable lymphadenopathy.
Histopathology of haemorrhagic lesions revealed multifocal extravasation of red blood cells (haemorrhage) with preservation of tissue architecture and absence of other abnormalities. Total bone marrow aplasia and depletion of all lymphoid tissue was the most prominent finding on histology. Activated macrophages and haemophagocytosis were seen on bone marrow cytology from two live calves. Polymerase chain reaction for bovine viral diarrhoea virus, bluetongue and epizootic haemorrhagic disease virus was negative. Several attempts to isolate a viral agent were unsuccessful.},
  author       = {Pardon, Bart and Steukers, Lennert and Dierick, Jan and Ducatelle, Richard and Saey, Veronique and Maes, Sofie and Vercauteren, Griet and De Clercq, Kris and Callens, Jozefien and De Bleecker, Koen and Deprez, Piet},
  issn         = {1865-1674},
  journal      = {TRANSBOUNDARY AND EMERGING DISEASES},
  keyword      = {calves,haemorrhagic diathesis,pancytopenia,bone marrow aplasia,neonatal,bleeding,VIRAL-DIARRHEA-VIRUS,BONE-MARROW APLASIA,BEEF-CALVES,PANCYTOPENIA,THROMBOCYTOPENIA,CIRCOVIRUS,ANEMIA,CATTLE,PARVOVIRUS-B19,DEFICIENCY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {135--146},
  title        = {Haemorrhagic diathesis in neonatal calves: an emerging syndrome in Europe},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1865-1682.2010.01098.x},
  volume       = {57},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Pardon, Bart, Lennert Steukers, Jan Dierick, Richard Ducatelle, Veronique Saey, Sofie Maes, Griet Vercauteren, et al. 2010. “Haemorrhagic Diathesis in Neonatal Calves: An Emerging Syndrome in Europe.” Transboundary and Emerging Diseases 57 (3): 135–146.
APA
Pardon, B., Steukers, L., Dierick, J., Ducatelle, R., Saey, V., Maes, S., Vercauteren, G., et al. (2010). Haemorrhagic diathesis in neonatal calves: an emerging syndrome in Europe. TRANSBOUNDARY AND EMERGING DISEASES, 57(3), 135–146.
Vancouver
1.
Pardon B, Steukers L, Dierick J, Ducatelle R, Saey V, Maes S, et al. Haemorrhagic diathesis in neonatal calves: an emerging syndrome in Europe. TRANSBOUNDARY AND EMERGING DISEASES. 2010;57(3):135–46.
MLA
Pardon, Bart, Lennert Steukers, Jan Dierick, et al. “Haemorrhagic Diathesis in Neonatal Calves: An Emerging Syndrome in Europe.” TRANSBOUNDARY AND EMERGING DISEASES 57.3 (2010): 135–146. Print.