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Children's privacy and digital literacy across cultures : implications for education and regulation

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Abstract
Taking a child-rights perspective centred on the child’s right to agency and participation, as well as privacy and protection, this chapter is grounded in the voices of children from diverse parts of the world discussing what they know about, and what for, the uses of their personal data. Drawing on a common methodology, researchers studying children’s data literacy in Austria, Belgium, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Palau, Thailand, Tonga, the UK and the USA compare what they have learned. This chapter will draw out the common and culturally specific findings from five empirical projects to document children’s experiences and assess the challenges faced by educators. It is argued that, while children might benefit from educational efforts that treat them as able to construct norms on appropriate data usage and information flows, to try to resolve the privacy paradox by making educators responsible for mitigating the harms resulting from the structural problem of unfair data processing is to misdirect scarce educational resources. Only strong regulation with unambiguous obligations and accountability mechanisms will ensure that children around the world are not subjected to privacy violations and commercial exploitation in a digital age.

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MLA
Livingstone, Sonia, et al. “Children’s Privacy and Digital Literacy across Cultures : Implications for Education and Regulation.” Learning to Live with Datafication : Educational Case Studies and Initiatives from across the World, edited by Luci Pangrazio and Julian Sefton-Green, Routledge, 2022, pp. 184–200, doi:10.4324/9781003136842-11.
APA
Livingstone, S., Bulger, M., Burton, P., Day, E., Lievens, E., Milkaite, I., … De Wolf, R. (2022). Children’s privacy and digital literacy across cultures : implications for education and regulation. In L. Pangrazio & J. Sefton-Green (Eds.), Learning to live with datafication : educational case studies and initiatives from across the world (pp. 184–200). https://doi.org/10.4324/9781003136842-11
Chicago author-date
Livingstone, Sonia, Monica Bulger, Patrick Burton, Emma Day, Eva Lievens, Ingrida Milkaite, Tom De Leyn, et al. 2022. “Children’s Privacy and Digital Literacy across Cultures : Implications for Education and Regulation.” In Learning to Live with Datafication : Educational Case Studies and Initiatives from across the World, edited by Luci Pangrazio and Julian Sefton-Green, 184–200. London: Routledge. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781003136842-11.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Livingstone, Sonia, Monica Bulger, Patrick Burton, Emma Day, Eva Lievens, Ingrida Milkaite, Tom De Leyn, Marijn Martens, Ricarose Roque, Katharine Sarikakis, Mariya Stoilova, and Ralf De Wolf. 2022. “Children’s Privacy and Digital Literacy across Cultures : Implications for Education and Regulation.” In Learning to Live with Datafication : Educational Case Studies and Initiatives from across the World, ed by. Luci Pangrazio and Julian Sefton-Green, 184–200. London: Routledge. doi:10.4324/9781003136842-11.
Vancouver
1.
Livingstone S, Bulger M, Burton P, Day E, Lievens E, Milkaite I, et al. Children’s privacy and digital literacy across cultures : implications for education and regulation. In: Pangrazio L, Sefton-Green J, editors. Learning to live with datafication : educational case studies and initiatives from across the world. London: Routledge; 2022. p. 184–200.
IEEE
[1]
S. Livingstone et al., “Children’s privacy and digital literacy across cultures : implications for education and regulation,” in Learning to live with datafication : educational case studies and initiatives from across the world, L. Pangrazio and J. Sefton-Green, Eds. London: Routledge, 2022, pp. 184–200.
@incollection{8747568,
  abstract     = {{Taking a child-rights perspective centred on the child’s right to agency and participation, as well as privacy and protection, this chapter is grounded in the voices of children from diverse parts of the world discussing what they know about, and what for, the uses of their personal data. Drawing on a common methodology, researchers studying children’s data literacy in Austria, Belgium, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Palau, Thailand, Tonga, the UK and the USA compare what they have learned. This chapter will draw out the common and culturally specific findings from five empirical projects to document children’s experiences and assess the challenges faced by educators. It is argued that, while children might benefit from educational efforts that treat them as able to construct norms on appropriate data usage and information flows, to try to resolve the privacy paradox by making educators responsible for mitigating the harms resulting from the structural problem of unfair data processing is to misdirect scarce educational resources. Only strong regulation with unambiguous obligations and accountability mechanisms will ensure that children around the world are not subjected to privacy violations and commercial exploitation in a digital age.}},
  author       = {{Livingstone, Sonia and Bulger, Monica and Burton, Patrick and Day, Emma and Lievens, Eva and Milkaite, Ingrida and De Leyn, Tom and Martens, Marijn and Roque, Ricarose and Sarikakis, Katharine and Stoilova, Mariya and De Wolf, Ralf}},
  booktitle    = {{Learning to live with datafication : educational case studies and initiatives from across the world}},
  editor       = {{Pangrazio, Luci and Sefton-Green, Julian}},
  isbn         = {{9780367683085}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{184--200}},
  publisher    = {{Routledge}},
  title        = {{Children's privacy and digital literacy across cultures : implications for education and regulation}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.4324/9781003136842-11}},
  year         = {{2022}},
}

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