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Embodied learning in persons with Multiple Sclerosis using melodic, sound and visual real-time feedback : a potential approach towards rehabilitation

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Organization
Abstract
Background: Given the prevalence of motor and cognitive functions in persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), we proposed that the theoretical framework of embodiment could provide a rehabilitation avenue to train these functions as one functional unit. Objective: We developed an environment in order to apply an experimental paradigm to test our notion of embodiment in the context of rehabilitation in PwMS. Methods: 31 PwMS and 30 age and gender matched healthy controls participated, underwent an embodied learning protocol in three conditions. The protocol involved learning a cognitive sequence while performing it through bodily stepping movement under three feedback conditions (melody, sound, visual) compared to healthy controls. Cognitive and movement performance was assessed by a delayed recall 15 minutes after undergoing the embodied learning protocol. Results: Half of participants correctly recalled the sequence in all three conditions, while more healthy controls achieved correct recall within the melody condition. Balance impairment predicted the speed of executing the sequence irrespective of learning, most apparent in the melody condition. Information processing speed predicted the speed of executing the sequence in the auditory conditions between participants who learnt and did not learn the sequence. Yet, in the melody condition, the level of SDMT did not affect the speed of executing the sequence. Conclusion: We confirmed that performing the embodied learning task was feasible and safe in all conditions and proposed how embodied learning could expand the current context of rehabilitation of cognitive and motor control, to target symptoms of dynamic balance and coordination in PwMS.

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MLA
Moumddjian, Lousin, et al. “Embodied Learning in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis Using Melodic, Sound and Visual Real-Time Feedback : A Potential Approach towards Rehabilitation.” RIMS Annual Conference, vol. 27, no. suppl. 3, 2021, pp. 22–22.
APA
Moumddjian, L., Six, J., Veldkamp, R., Geys, J., Van Der Linden, C., Goetschalckx, M., … Feys, P. (2021). Embodied learning in persons with Multiple Sclerosis using melodic, sound and visual real-time feedback : a potential approach towards rehabilitation. RIMS Annual Conference, 27(suppl. 3), 22–22.
Chicago author-date
Moumddjian, Lousin, Joren Six, Renee Veldkamp, Jenke Geys, Channa Van Der Linden, Mieke Goetschalckx, Johan Van Nieuwenhoven, Ilse Bosmans, Marc Leman, and Peter Feys. 2021. “Embodied Learning in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis Using Melodic, Sound and Visual Real-Time Feedback : A Potential Approach towards Rehabilitation.” In RIMS Annual Conference, 27:22–22.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Moumddjian, Lousin, Joren Six, Renee Veldkamp, Jenke Geys, Channa Van Der Linden, Mieke Goetschalckx, Johan Van Nieuwenhoven, Ilse Bosmans, Marc Leman, and Peter Feys. 2021. “Embodied Learning in Persons with Multiple Sclerosis Using Melodic, Sound and Visual Real-Time Feedback : A Potential Approach towards Rehabilitation.” In RIMS Annual Conference, 27:22–22.
Vancouver
1.
Moumddjian L, Six J, Veldkamp R, Geys J, Van Der Linden C, Goetschalckx M, et al. Embodied learning in persons with Multiple Sclerosis using melodic, sound and visual real-time feedback : a potential approach towards rehabilitation. In: RIMS Annual Conference. 2021. p. 22–22.
IEEE
[1]
L. Moumddjian et al., “Embodied learning in persons with Multiple Sclerosis using melodic, sound and visual real-time feedback : a potential approach towards rehabilitation,” in RIMS Annual Conference, Online, 2021, vol. 27, no. suppl. 3, pp. 22–22.
@inproceedings{8745705,
  abstract     = {{Background: Given the prevalence of motor and cognitive functions in persons with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), we proposed that the theoretical framework of embodiment could provide a rehabilitation avenue to train these functions as one functional unit.

Objective: We developed an environment in order to apply an experimental paradigm to test our notion of embodiment in the context of rehabilitation in PwMS.

Methods: 31 PwMS and 30 age and gender matched healthy controls participated, underwent an embodied learning protocol in three conditions. The protocol involved learning a cognitive sequence while performing it through bodily stepping movement under three feedback conditions (melody, sound, visual) compared to healthy controls. Cognitive and movement performance was assessed by a delayed recall 15 minutes after undergoing the embodied learning protocol.

Results: Half of participants correctly recalled the sequence in all three conditions, while more healthy controls achieved correct recall within the melody condition. Balance impairment predicted the speed of executing the sequence irrespective of learning, most apparent in the melody condition. Information processing speed predicted the speed of executing the sequence in the auditory conditions between participants who learnt and did not learn the sequence. Yet, in the melody condition, the level of SDMT did not affect the speed of executing the sequence.

Conclusion: We confirmed that performing the embodied learning task was feasible and safe in all conditions and proposed how embodied learning could expand the current context of rehabilitation of cognitive and motor control, to target symptoms of dynamic balance and coordination in PwMS.}},
  articleno    = {{Meeting Abstract 36}},
  author       = {{Moumddjian, Lousin and Six, Joren and Veldkamp, Renee and Geys, Jenke and Van Der Linden, Channa and Goetschalckx, Mieke and Van Nieuwenhoven, Johan and Bosmans, Ilse and Leman, Marc and Feys, Peter}},
  booktitle    = {{RIMS Annual Conference}},
  issn         = {{1352-4585}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  location     = {{Online}},
  number       = {{suppl. 3}},
  pages        = {{Meeting Abstract 36:22--Meeting Abstract 36:22}},
  title        = {{Embodied learning in persons with Multiple Sclerosis using melodic, sound and visual real-time feedback : a potential approach towards rehabilitation}},
  url          = {{https://doi.org/10.1177/13524585211053237}},
  volume       = {{27}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}

Web of Science
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