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Human impact on symbioses between aquatic organisms and microbes

(2021) AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY. 87. p.113-138
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Abstract
Aquatic organisms rely on microbial symbionts for coping with various challenges they encounter during stress and for defending themselves against predators, pathogens and parasites. Microbial symbionts are also often indispensable for the host's development or life cycle completion. Many aquatic ecosystems are currently under pressure due to diverse human activities that have a profound impact on ecosystem functioning. These human activities are also expected to alter interactions between aquatic hosts and their associated microbes. This can directly impact the host's health and-given the importance and widespread occurrence of microbial symbiosis in aquatic systems-the ecosystem at large. In this review, we provide an overview of the importance of microbial symbionts for aquatic organisms, and we consider how the beneficial services provided by microbial symbionts can be affected by human activities. The scarcity of available studies that assess the functional consequences of human impacts on aquatic microbial symbioses shows that our knowledge on this topic is currently limited, making it difficult to draw general conclusions and predict future changes in microbial symbiont-host relationships in a changing world. To address this important knowledge gap, we provide an overview of approaches that can be used to assess the impact of human disturbances on the functioning of aquatic microbial symbioses.
Keywords
ECO-EVOLUTIONARY DYNAMICS, INTESTINAL ENZYME-ACTIVITIES, FED, GRADED-LEVELS, GUT MICROBIOTA, ENVIRONMENTAL CONCENTRATIONS, PHENOTYPIC, PLASTICITY, BACTERIAL COMMUNITIES, OCEAN ACIDIFICATION, SALINITY, TOLERANCE, INFECTIOUS-DISEASE, Host-symbiont interactions, Aquatic microbial symbioses, Mutualism, Anthropogenic disturbances

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MLA
Stock, Willem, et al. “Human Impact on Symbioses between Aquatic Organisms and Microbes.” AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY, vol. 87, 2021, pp. 113–38, doi:10.3354/ame01973.
APA
Stock, W., Callens, M., Houwenhuyse, S., Schols, R., Goel, N., Coone, M., … Decaestecker, E. (2021). Human impact on symbioses between aquatic organisms and microbes. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY, 87, 113–138. https://doi.org/10.3354/ame01973
Chicago author-date
Stock, Willem, Martijn Callens, Shira Houwenhuyse, Ruben Schols, Naina Goel, Mallon Coone, Charlotte Theys, et al. 2021. “Human Impact on Symbioses between Aquatic Organisms and Microbes.” AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY 87: 113–38. https://doi.org/10.3354/ame01973.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Stock, Willem, Martijn Callens, Shira Houwenhuyse, Ruben Schols, Naina Goel, Mallon Coone, Charlotte Theys, Vienna Delnat, Alice Boudry, Ester M. Eckert, Cecilia Laspoumaderes, Hans-Peter Grossart, Luc De Meester, Robby Stoks, Koen Sabbe, and Ellen Decaestecker. 2021. “Human Impact on Symbioses between Aquatic Organisms and Microbes.” AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY 87: 113–138. doi:10.3354/ame01973.
Vancouver
1.
Stock W, Callens M, Houwenhuyse S, Schols R, Goel N, Coone M, et al. Human impact on symbioses between aquatic organisms and microbes. AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY. 2021;87:113–38.
IEEE
[1]
W. Stock et al., “Human impact on symbioses between aquatic organisms and microbes,” AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY, vol. 87, pp. 113–138, 2021.
@article{8742322,
  abstract     = {{Aquatic organisms rely on microbial symbionts for coping with various challenges they encounter during stress and for defending themselves against predators, pathogens and parasites. Microbial symbionts are also often indispensable for the host's development or life cycle completion. Many aquatic ecosystems are currently under pressure due to diverse human activities that have a profound impact on ecosystem functioning. These human activities are also expected to alter interactions between aquatic hosts and their associated microbes. This can directly impact the host's health and-given the importance and widespread occurrence of microbial symbiosis in aquatic systems-the ecosystem at large. In this review, we provide an overview of the importance of microbial symbionts for aquatic organisms, and we consider how the beneficial services provided by microbial symbionts can be affected by human activities. The scarcity of available studies that assess the functional consequences of human impacts on aquatic microbial symbioses shows that our knowledge on this topic is currently limited, making it difficult to draw general conclusions and predict future changes in microbial symbiont-host relationships in a changing world. To address this important knowledge gap, we provide an overview of approaches that can be used to assess the impact of human disturbances on the functioning of aquatic microbial symbioses.}},
  author       = {{Stock, Willem and Callens, Martijn and Houwenhuyse, Shira and Schols, Ruben and Goel, Naina and Coone, Mallon and Theys, Charlotte and Delnat, Vienna and Boudry, Alice and Eckert, Ester M. and Laspoumaderes, Cecilia and Grossart, Hans-Peter and De Meester, Luc and Stoks, Robby and Sabbe, Koen and Decaestecker, Ellen}},
  issn         = {{0948-3055}},
  journal      = {{AQUATIC MICROBIAL ECOLOGY}},
  keywords     = {{ECO-EVOLUTIONARY DYNAMICS,INTESTINAL ENZYME-ACTIVITIES,FED,GRADED-LEVELS,GUT MICROBIOTA,ENVIRONMENTAL CONCENTRATIONS,PHENOTYPIC,PLASTICITY,BACTERIAL COMMUNITIES,OCEAN ACIDIFICATION,SALINITY,TOLERANCE,INFECTIOUS-DISEASE,Host-symbiont interactions,Aquatic microbial symbioses,Mutualism,Anthropogenic disturbances}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{113--138}},
  title        = {{Human impact on symbioses between aquatic organisms and microbes}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.3354/ame01973}},
  volume       = {{87}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}

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