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Can a video game with a fictional minority group decrease intergroup biases towards non-fictional minorities? A social neuroscience study

(2022)
Author
Organization
Abstract
A critical scientific and societal challenge consists in developing and evaluating interventions that reduce prejudice towards outgroups. Video games appear to be a promising method but a number of falls in the current scientific literature prevents to fully understand the potential sizeable impact of video games on reducing prejudice. The present study investigated to what extent a video game designed to reduce prejudice towards minorities in a fictional society has the potential to reduce prejudice towards non-fictional minorities. Participants played either a recently developed game (Horns of Justice, HoJ) designed to reduce prejudice towards non-fictional minorities or a control game. After playing at home, participants performed two tasks in a lab context. We observed an overall positive effect of playing HoJ compared to the control game on attenuating prejudice towards an outgroup individual. We indeed observed that players of the control game had more midfrontal theta activity, reflecting more cognitive conflict, when they acted prosociality towards the outgroup participant and a lower neural response to the pain of the outgroup participant compared to the ingroup participant. These effects were attenuated for players of HoJ. We also observed that players of HoJ had a higher sense of agency when they decided to help the outgroup participant compared to when they did not help the outgroup participant, an effect not observable in players of the control game. These results are promising as they support evidence that using fictional characters in video games may induce positive changes towards non-fictional individuals.

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Pech, Guillaume Pierre, and Emilie Caspar. Can a Video Game with a Fictional Minority Group Decrease Intergroup Biases towards Non-Fictional Minorities? A Social Neuroscience Study. 2022, doi:10.31234/osf.io/dfhza.
APA
Pech, G. P., & Caspar, E. (2022). Can a video game with a fictional minority group decrease intergroup biases towards non-fictional minorities? A social neuroscience study. https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/dfhza
Chicago author-date
Pech, Guillaume Pierre, and Emilie Caspar. 2022. “Can a Video Game with a Fictional Minority Group Decrease Intergroup Biases towards Non-Fictional Minorities? A Social Neuroscience Study.” https://doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/dfhza.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Pech, Guillaume Pierre, and Emilie Caspar. 2022. “Can a Video Game with a Fictional Minority Group Decrease Intergroup Biases towards Non-Fictional Minorities? A Social Neuroscience Study.” doi:10.31234/osf.io/dfhza.
Vancouver
1.
Pech GP, Caspar E. Can a video game with a fictional minority group decrease intergroup biases towards non-fictional minorities? A social neuroscience study. 2022.
IEEE
[1]
G. P. Pech and E. Caspar, “Can a video game with a fictional minority group decrease intergroup biases towards non-fictional minorities? A social neuroscience study.” 2022.
@misc{8740341,
  abstract     = {{A critical scientific and societal challenge consists in developing and evaluating interventions that reduce prejudice towards outgroups. Video games appear to be a promising method but a number of falls in the current scientific literature prevents to fully understand the potential sizeable impact of video games on reducing prejudice. The present study investigated to what extent a video game designed to reduce prejudice towards minorities in a fictional society has the potential to reduce prejudice towards non-fictional minorities. Participants played either a recently developed game (Horns of Justice, HoJ) designed to reduce prejudice towards non-fictional minorities or a control game. After playing at home, participants performed two tasks in a lab context. We observed an overall positive effect of playing HoJ compared to the control game on attenuating prejudice towards an outgroup individual. We indeed observed that players of the control game had more midfrontal theta activity, reflecting more cognitive conflict, when they acted prosociality towards the outgroup participant and a lower neural response to the pain of the outgroup participant compared to the ingroup participant. These effects were attenuated for players of HoJ. We also observed that players of HoJ had a higher sense of agency when they decided to help the outgroup participant compared to when they did not help the outgroup participant, an effect not observable in players of the control game. These results are promising as they support evidence that using fictional characters in video games may induce positive changes towards non-fictional individuals.}},
  author       = {{Pech, Guillaume Pierre and Caspar, Emilie}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{23}},
  title        = {{Can a video game with a fictional minority group decrease intergroup biases towards non-fictional minorities? A social neuroscience study}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.31234/osf.io/dfhza}},
  year         = {{2022}},
}

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