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Contribution to the understanding of the bacteriophage-host interaction for phage therapy against avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC)

(2022)
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(UGent) , (UGent) and Hanne Ingmer
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Abstract
Excess use of antimicrobials and release into the environment for over half a century have generated a constant selective pressure for resistant bacterial strains. Consequently, we are facing a worldwide antibiotic resistance challenge with increasing numbers of bacterial infection becoming difficult to treat once again. Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) is one of the leading pathogens affecting poultry worldwide, and various multi-drug resistant strains have been isolated. APEC strains with O-serogroup O1, O2, or O78 have been shown to cause the majority of infections. The advances in the therapeutic use of the bacterial viruses, bacteriophages (phages), have highlighted their potential use as an alternative or supplement treatment against bacterial pathogens. However, we are only just beginning to understand the diversity of phages, and the use of phages in therapy requires a detailed characterisation of the candidate phages prior to their application to ensure that they have the expected potential to kill pathogenic bacteria and have therapeutic effects, while minimising negative environmental modifications. The understanding of the phage-host interactions has shown to be essential for the development and application of a successful phage therapy. This PhD dissertation contributes to our understanding of E. coli-infecting phage (coliphage)-host interaction for phage therapy against APEC by determine in vitro growth dynamics as well as underlying mechanism of phage resistance.

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Citation

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MLA
Sørensen, Patricia Espenhain. Contribution to the Understanding of the Bacteriophage-Host Interaction for Phage Therapy against Avian Pathogenic Escherichia Coli (APEC). Ghent University. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine ; Ross University. School of Veterinary Medicine, 2022.
APA
Sørensen, P. E. (2022). Contribution to the understanding of the bacteriophage-host interaction for phage therapy against avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC). Ghent University. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine ; Ross University. School of Veterinary Medicine, Merelbeke, Belgium ; North Brunswick Township, New Jersey.
Chicago author-date
Sørensen, Patricia Espenhain. 2022. “Contribution to the Understanding of the Bacteriophage-Host Interaction for Phage Therapy against Avian Pathogenic Escherichia Coli (APEC).” Merelbeke, Belgium ; North Brunswick Township, New Jersey: Ghent University. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine ; Ross University. School of Veterinary Medicine.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Sørensen, Patricia Espenhain. 2022. “Contribution to the Understanding of the Bacteriophage-Host Interaction for Phage Therapy against Avian Pathogenic Escherichia Coli (APEC).” Merelbeke, Belgium ; North Brunswick Township, New Jersey: Ghent University. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine ; Ross University. School of Veterinary Medicine.
Vancouver
1.
Sørensen PE. Contribution to the understanding of the bacteriophage-host interaction for phage therapy against avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC). [Merelbeke, Belgium ; North Brunswick Township, New Jersey]: Ghent University. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine ; Ross University. School of Veterinary Medicine; 2022.
IEEE
[1]
P. E. Sørensen, “Contribution to the understanding of the bacteriophage-host interaction for phage therapy against avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC),” Ghent University. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine ; Ross University. School of Veterinary Medicine, Merelbeke, Belgium ; North Brunswick Township, New Jersey, 2022.
@phdthesis{8739675,
  abstract     = {{Excess use of antimicrobials and release into the environment for over half a century have generated a constant selective pressure for resistant bacterial strains. Consequently, we are facing a worldwide antibiotic resistance challenge with increasing numbers of bacterial infection becoming difficult to treat once again. Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) is one of the leading pathogens affecting poultry worldwide, and various multi-drug resistant strains have been isolated. APEC strains with O-serogroup O1, O2, or O78 have been shown to cause the majority of infections. The advances in the therapeutic use of the bacterial viruses, bacteriophages (phages), have highlighted their potential use as an alternative or supplement treatment against bacterial pathogens. However, we are only just beginning to understand the diversity of phages, and the use of phages in therapy requires a detailed characterisation of the candidate phages prior to their application to ensure that they have the expected potential to kill pathogenic bacteria and have therapeutic effects, while minimising negative environmental modifications. The understanding of the phage-host interactions has shown to be essential for the development and application of a successful phage therapy. This PhD dissertation contributes to our understanding of E. coli-infecting phage (coliphage)-host interaction for phage therapy against APEC by determine in vitro growth dynamics as well as underlying mechanism of phage resistance.}},
  author       = {{Sørensen, Patricia Espenhain}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{VI, 222}},
  publisher    = {{Ghent University. Faculty of Veterinary Medicine ; Ross University. School of Veterinary Medicine}},
  school       = {{Ghent University}},
  title        = {{Contribution to the understanding of the bacteriophage-host interaction for phage therapy against avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC)}},
  year         = {{2022}},
}