Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

The auxin influx carriers AUX1 and LAX3 are involved in auxin-ethylene interactions during apical hook development in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings

Filip Vandenbussche UGent, Jan Petrasek, Petra Zadnikova UGent, Klara Hoyerova, Bedrich Pesek, Vered Raz, Ranjan Swarup, Malcolm Bennett, Eva Zazimalova and Eva Benkova UGent, et al. (2010) DEVELOPMENT. 137(4). p.597-606
abstract
Dark-grown dicotyledonous seedlings form a hook-like structure at the top of the hypocotyl, which is controlled by the hormones auxin and ethylene. Hook formation is dependent on an auxin signal gradient, whereas hook exaggeration is part of the triple response provoked by ethylene in dark-grown Arabidopsis seedlings. Several other hormones and light are also known to be involved in hook development, but the molecular mechanisms that lead to the initial installation of an auxin gradient are still poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to unravel the cross-talk between auxin and ethylene in the apical hook. Auxin measurements, the expression pattern of the auxin reporter DR5::GUS and the localization of auxin biosynthesis enzymes and influx carriers collectively indicate the necessity for auxin biosynthesis and efficient auxin translocation from the cotyledons and meristem into the hypocotyl in order to support proper hook development. Auxin accumulation in the meristem and cotyledons and in the hypocotyl is increased similar to 2-fold upon treatment with ethylene. In addition, a strong ethylene signal leads to enhanced auxin biosynthesis at the inner side of the hook. Finally, mutant analysis demonstrates that the auxin influx carrier LAX3 is indispensable for proper hook formation, whereas the auxin influx carrier AUX1 is involved in the hook exaggeration phenotype induced by ethylene.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
DIFFERENTIAL GROWTH, LATERAL ROOT CAP, PLANT DEVELOPMENT, RESPONSE PATHWAY, CELL ELONGATION, WILD-TYPE, TRANSPORT, BIOSYNTHESIS, EFFLUX, MUTATION
journal title
DEVELOPMENT
Development
volume
137
issue
4
pages
10 pages
publisher
COMPANY OF BIOLOGISTS LTD
place of publication
CAMBRIDGE
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000274016900008
JCR category
DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY
JCR impact factor
6.898 (2010)
JCR rank
4/38 (2010)
JCR quartile
1 (2010)
ISSN
0950-1991
DOI
10.1242/dev.040790
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I don't know the status of the copyright for this publication
id
873815
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-873815
date created
2010-02-22 15:30:08
date last changed
2012-09-19 14:04:03
@article{873815,
  abstract     = {Dark-grown dicotyledonous seedlings form a hook-like structure at the top of the hypocotyl, which is controlled by the hormones auxin and ethylene. Hook formation is dependent on an auxin signal gradient, whereas hook exaggeration is part of the triple response provoked by ethylene in dark-grown Arabidopsis seedlings. Several other hormones and light are also known to be involved in hook development, but the molecular mechanisms that lead to the initial installation of an auxin gradient are still poorly understood. In this study, we aimed to unravel the cross-talk between auxin and ethylene in the apical hook. Auxin measurements, the expression pattern of the auxin reporter DR5::GUS and the localization of auxin biosynthesis enzymes and influx carriers collectively indicate the necessity for auxin biosynthesis and efficient auxin translocation from the cotyledons and meristem into the hypocotyl in order to support proper hook development. Auxin accumulation in the meristem and cotyledons and in the hypocotyl is increased similar to 2-fold upon treatment with ethylene. In addition, a strong ethylene signal leads to enhanced auxin biosynthesis at the inner side of the hook. Finally, mutant analysis demonstrates that the auxin influx carrier LAX3 is indispensable for proper hook formation, whereas the auxin influx carrier AUX1 is involved in the hook exaggeration phenotype induced by ethylene.},
  author       = {Vandenbussche, Filip and Petrasek, Jan and Zadnikova, Petra and Hoyerova, Klara and Pesek, Bedrich and Raz, Vered and Swarup, Ranjan and Bennett, Malcolm and Zazimalova, Eva and Benkova, Eva and Van Der Straeten, Dominique},
  issn         = {0950-1991},
  journal      = {DEVELOPMENT},
  keyword      = {DIFFERENTIAL GROWTH,LATERAL ROOT CAP,PLANT DEVELOPMENT,RESPONSE PATHWAY,CELL ELONGATION,WILD-TYPE,TRANSPORT,BIOSYNTHESIS,EFFLUX,MUTATION},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {597--606},
  publisher    = {COMPANY OF BIOLOGISTS LTD},
  title        = {The auxin influx carriers AUX1 and LAX3 are involved in auxin-ethylene interactions during apical hook development in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1242/dev.040790},
  volume       = {137},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Vandenbussche, Filip, Jan Petrasek, Petra Zadnikova, Klara Hoyerova, Bedrich Pesek, Vered Raz, Ranjan Swarup, et al. 2010. “The Auxin Influx Carriers AUX1 and LAX3 Are Involved in Auxin-ethylene Interactions During Apical Hook Development in Arabidopsis Thaliana Seedlings.” Development 137 (4): 597–606.
APA
Vandenbussche, F., Petrasek, J., Zadnikova, P., Hoyerova, K., Pesek, B., Raz, V., Swarup, R., et al. (2010). The auxin influx carriers AUX1 and LAX3 are involved in auxin-ethylene interactions during apical hook development in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. DEVELOPMENT, 137(4), 597–606.
Vancouver
1.
Vandenbussche F, Petrasek J, Zadnikova P, Hoyerova K, Pesek B, Raz V, et al. The auxin influx carriers AUX1 and LAX3 are involved in auxin-ethylene interactions during apical hook development in Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings. DEVELOPMENT. CAMBRIDGE: COMPANY OF BIOLOGISTS LTD; 2010;137(4):597–606.
MLA
Vandenbussche, Filip, Jan Petrasek, Petra Zadnikova, et al. “The Auxin Influx Carriers AUX1 and LAX3 Are Involved in Auxin-ethylene Interactions During Apical Hook Development in Arabidopsis Thaliana Seedlings.” DEVELOPMENT 137.4 (2010): 597–606. Print.