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Effectiveness of the mHealth intervention 'MyDayPlan' to increase physical activity : an aggregated single case approach

Laurent Degroote (UGent) , Annick De Paepe (UGent) , Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij (UGent) , Delfien Van Dyck (UGent) and Geert Crombez (UGent)
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Abstract
Background: e- and mHealth interventions using self-regulation techniques like action and coping planning have the potential to tackle the worldwide problem of physical inactivity. However, they often use one-week self-regulation cycles, providing support toward an active lifestyle on a weekly basis. This may be too long to anticipate on certain contextual factors that may fluctuate from day to day and may influence physical activity. Consequently, the formulated action and coping plans often lack specificity and instrumentality, which may decrease effectiveness of the intervention. The aim of this study was to evaluate effectiveness of a self-regulation, app-based intervention called 'MyDayPlan'. "MyDayPlan' provides an innovative daily cycle in which users are guided towards more physical activity via self-regulation techniques such as goal setting, action planning, coping planning and self-monitoring of behaviour. Methods: An ABAB single-case design was conducted in 35 inactive adults between 18 and 58 years (M = 40 years). The A phases (A1 and A2) were the control phases in which the 'MyDayPlan' intervention was not provided. The B phases (B1 and B2) were the intervention phases in which 'MyDayPlan' was used on a daily basis. The length of the four phases varied within and between the participants. Each phase lasted a minimum of 5 days and the total study lasted 32 days for each participant. Participants wore a Fitbit activity tracker during waking hours to assess number of daily steps as an outcome. Single cases were aggregated and data were analysed using multilevel models to test intervention effects and possible carry-over effects. Results: Results showed an average intervention effect with a significant increase in number of daily steps from the control to intervention phases for each AB combination. From A1 to B1, an increase of 1424 steps (95% CI [775.42, 2072.32], t (1082) = 4.31,p < .001), and from A2 to B2, an increase of 1181 steps (95% CI [392.98, 1968.16], t (1082) = 2.94, p = .003) were found. Furthermore, the number of daily steps decreased significantly (1134 steps) when going from the first intervention phase (B1) to the second control phase (A2) (95% CI [- 1755.60, - 512.38], t (1082) = - 3.58, p < .001). We found no evidence for a difference in trend between the two control (95% CI [- 114.59, 197.99], t (1078) = .52, p = .60) and intervention phases (95% CI [- 128.79,284.22], t (1078) = .74, p = .46). This reveals, in contrast to what was hypothesized, no evidence for a carry-over effect after removing the 'MyDayPlan' app after the first intervention phase (B1). Conclusion: This study adds evidence that the self-regulation mHealth intervention, 'MyDayPlan' has the capacity to positively influence physical activity levels in an inactive adult population. Furthermore, this study provides evidence for the potential of interventions adopting a daily self-regulation cycle in general.
Keywords
BEHAVIOR-CHANGE TECHNIQUES, ACTIVITY QUESTIONNAIRE, HEALTH BEHAVIORS, IMPROVE HEALTH, WALKING, STEPS, MAINTENANCE, RELIABILITY, VALIDITY, ADOPTION

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MLA
Degroote, Laurent, et al. “Effectiveness of the MHealth Intervention ‘MyDayPlan’ to Increase Physical Activity : An Aggregated Single Case Approach.” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, vol. 18, no. 1, 2021, doi:10.1186/s12966-021-01163-2.
APA
Degroote, L., De Paepe, A., De Bourdeaudhuij, I., Van Dyck, D., & Crombez, G. (2021). Effectiveness of the mHealth intervention “MyDayPlan” to increase physical activity : an aggregated single case approach. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, 18(1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12966-021-01163-2
Chicago author-date
Degroote, Laurent, Annick De Paepe, Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij, Delfien Van Dyck, and Geert Crombez. 2021. “Effectiveness of the MHealth Intervention ‘MyDayPlan’ to Increase Physical Activity : An Aggregated Single Case Approach.” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY 18 (1). https://doi.org/10.1186/s12966-021-01163-2.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Degroote, Laurent, Annick De Paepe, Ilse De Bourdeaudhuij, Delfien Van Dyck, and Geert Crombez. 2021. “Effectiveness of the MHealth Intervention ‘MyDayPlan’ to Increase Physical Activity : An Aggregated Single Case Approach.” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY 18 (1). doi:10.1186/s12966-021-01163-2.
Vancouver
1.
Degroote L, De Paepe A, De Bourdeaudhuij I, Van Dyck D, Crombez G. Effectiveness of the mHealth intervention “MyDayPlan” to increase physical activity : an aggregated single case approach. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY. 2021;18(1).
IEEE
[1]
L. Degroote, A. De Paepe, I. De Bourdeaudhuij, D. Van Dyck, and G. Crombez, “Effectiveness of the mHealth intervention ‘MyDayPlan’ to increase physical activity : an aggregated single case approach,” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY, vol. 18, no. 1, 2021.
@article{8726631,
  abstract     = {{Background: e- and mHealth interventions using self-regulation techniques like action and coping planning have the potential to tackle the worldwide problem of physical inactivity. However, they often use one-week self-regulation cycles, providing support toward an active lifestyle on a weekly basis. This may be too long to anticipate on certain contextual factors that may fluctuate from day to day and may influence physical activity. Consequently, the formulated action and coping plans often lack specificity and instrumentality, which may decrease effectiveness of the intervention. The aim of this study was to evaluate effectiveness of a self-regulation, app-based intervention called 'MyDayPlan'. "MyDayPlan' provides an innovative daily cycle in which users are guided towards more physical activity via self-regulation techniques such as goal setting, action planning, coping planning and self-monitoring of behaviour. Methods: An ABAB single-case design was conducted in 35 inactive adults between 18 and 58 years (M = 40 years). The A phases (A1 and A2) were the control phases in which the 'MyDayPlan' intervention was not provided. The B phases (B1 and B2) were the intervention phases in which 'MyDayPlan' was used on a daily basis. The length of the four phases varied within and between the participants. Each phase lasted a minimum of 5 days and the total study lasted 32 days for each participant. Participants wore a Fitbit activity tracker during waking hours to assess number of daily steps as an outcome. Single cases were aggregated and data were analysed using multilevel models to test intervention effects and possible carry-over effects. Results: Results showed an average intervention effect with a significant increase in number of daily steps from the control to intervention phases for each AB combination. From A1 to B1, an increase of 1424 steps (95% CI [775.42, 2072.32], t (1082) = 4.31,p < .001), and from A2 to B2, an increase of 1181 steps (95% CI [392.98, 1968.16], t (1082) = 2.94, p = .003) were found. Furthermore, the number of daily steps decreased significantly (1134 steps) when going from the first intervention phase (B1) to the second control phase (A2) (95% CI [- 1755.60, - 512.38], t (1082) = - 3.58, p < .001). We found no evidence for a difference in trend between the two control (95% CI [- 114.59, 197.99], t (1078) = .52, p = .60) and intervention phases (95% CI [- 128.79,284.22], t (1078) = .74, p = .46). This reveals, in contrast to what was hypothesized, no evidence for a carry-over effect after removing the 'MyDayPlan' app after the first intervention phase (B1). Conclusion: This study adds evidence that the self-regulation mHealth intervention, 'MyDayPlan' has the capacity to positively influence physical activity levels in an inactive adult population. Furthermore, this study provides evidence for the potential of interventions adopting a daily self-regulation cycle in general.}},
  articleno    = {{92}},
  author       = {{Degroote, Laurent and De Paepe, Annick and De Bourdeaudhuij, Ilse and Van Dyck, Delfien and Crombez, Geert}},
  issn         = {{1479-5868}},
  journal      = {{INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF BEHAVIORAL NUTRITION AND PHYSICAL ACTIVITY}},
  keywords     = {{BEHAVIOR-CHANGE TECHNIQUES,ACTIVITY QUESTIONNAIRE,HEALTH BEHAVIORS,IMPROVE HEALTH,WALKING,STEPS,MAINTENANCE,RELIABILITY,VALIDITY,ADOPTION}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{1}},
  pages        = {{12}},
  title        = {{Effectiveness of the mHealth intervention 'MyDayPlan' to increase physical activity : an aggregated single case approach}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s12966-021-01163-2}},
  volume       = {{18}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}

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