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Radical Scavenging Capacity of Hop-derived Products

Laura Van Hoyweghen UGent, Martin Biendl and Arne Heyerick UGent (2010) Brewing Science. 63(1). p.1-5
abstract
Dietary antioxidants are believed to be effective in the prevention of oxidative stress related diseases (eg. cancer and cardiovascular diseases). Polyphenols are widely recognized as potent antioxidants as they can scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS). The hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.), used in a variety of health applications and indispensible as a beer ingredient, is an interesting source of polyphenolic antioxidants including tannins, fl avonol glycosides and prenylated fl avonoids. In addition, also hop oil and hop acids (including downstream products) have been reported as potent antioxidants. In this investigation, the radical scavenging activity of hop products (including different extracts and downstream products) was investigated using two different antioxidant assays: the ORAC to study the peroxyl radical scavenging capacity and HORAC to investigate the hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity. Quercetin and a grape extract containing oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPC) were used for comparison. The peroxyl radical scavenging capacities of prenylated fl avonoids were highly analogous to quercetin and OPC equaling 5–10 Trolox equivalents. The hydroxyl radical scavenging capacities of Xantho-FlavTM products correlated with the concentration of xanthohumol and pure xanthohumol (> 95 %) corresponded to about 60 Trolox equivalents, which is 10–20 times higher than that of quercetin and OPC. Consistently, ethanol extracts showed a higher radical scavenging activity than CO2-extracts. Furthermore, tannin extract proved an effi cient peroxyl radical scavenger. Thus it can be concluded that xanthohumol-containing products show high radical scavenging capacities, which partly may be mediated by its metal ion chelating properties. Apart from their possible health benefi ts, these products might also contribute antioxidant power during the brewing process and during storage.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
health, antioxidant, xanthohumol, hops
journal title
Brewing Science
editor
Lydia Winkelmann
volume
63
issue
1
pages
1 - 5
publisher
Fachverlag Hans Carl GmbH
place of publication
Nuremberg, Germany
ISSN
1613-2041
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A2
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
872652
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-872652
date created
2010-02-22 10:59:14
date last changed
2010-03-12 14:45:28
@article{872652,
  abstract     = {Dietary antioxidants are believed to be effective in the prevention of oxidative stress related diseases (eg. cancer and cardiovascular diseases). Polyphenols are widely recognized as potent antioxidants as they can scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS). The hop plant (Humulus lupulus L.), used in a variety of health applications and indispensible as a beer ingredient, is an interesting source of polyphenolic antioxidants including tannins, fl avonol glycosides and prenylated fl avonoids. In addition, also hop oil and hop acids (including downstream products) have been reported as potent antioxidants. In this investigation, the radical scavenging activity of hop products (including different extracts and downstream products) was investigated using two different antioxidant assays: the ORAC to study the peroxyl radical scavenging capacity and HORAC to investigate the hydroxyl radical scavenging capacity. Quercetin and a grape extract containing oligomeric proanthocyanidins (OPC) were used for comparison. The peroxyl radical scavenging capacities of prenylated fl avonoids were highly analogous to quercetin and OPC equaling 5--10 Trolox equivalents. The hydroxyl radical scavenging capacities of Xantho-FlavTM products correlated with the concentration of xanthohumol and pure xanthohumol ({\textrangle} 95 \%) corresponded to about 60 Trolox equivalents, which is 10--20 times higher than that of quercetin and OPC. Consistently, ethanol extracts showed a higher radical scavenging activity than CO2-extracts. Furthermore, tannin extract proved an effi cient peroxyl radical scavenger. Thus it can be concluded that xanthohumol-containing products show high radical scavenging capacities, which partly may be mediated by its metal ion chelating properties. Apart from their possible health benefi ts, these products might also contribute antioxidant power during the brewing process and during storage.},
  author       = {Van Hoyweghen, Laura and Biendl, Martin and Heyerick, Arne},
  editor       = {Winkelmann, Lydia },
  issn         = {1613-2041},
  journal      = {Brewing Science},
  keyword      = {health,antioxidant,xanthohumol,hops},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {1--5},
  publisher    = {Fachverlag Hans Carl GmbH},
  title        = {Radical Scavenging Capacity of Hop-derived Products},
  volume       = {63},
  year         = {2010},
}

Chicago
Van Hoyweghen, Laura, Martin Biendl, and Arne Heyerick. 2010. “Radical Scavenging Capacity of Hop-derived Products.” Ed. Lydia Winkelmann. Brewing Science 63 (1): 1–5.
APA
Van Hoyweghen, L., Biendl, M., & Heyerick, A. (2010). Radical Scavenging Capacity of Hop-derived Products. (L. Winkelmann, Ed.)Brewing Science, 63(1), 1–5.
Vancouver
1.
Van Hoyweghen L, Biendl M, Heyerick A. Radical Scavenging Capacity of Hop-derived Products. Winkelmann L, editor. Brewing Science. Nuremberg, Germany: Fachverlag Hans Carl GmbH; 2010;63(1):1–5.
MLA
Van Hoyweghen, Laura, Martin Biendl, and Arne Heyerick. “Radical Scavenging Capacity of Hop-derived Products.” Ed. Lydia Winkelmann. Brewing Science 63.1 (2010): 1–5. Print.