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Do interactions between application rate and native soil organic matter content determine the degradation of exogenous organic carbon?

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Abstract
Although the amendment of various forms of exogenous organic matter (EOM) is a common practice in cropland production, it is to date not clear if its mineralisation in soil depends on application rate. Previous research suggested that spatial concentration of EOM in soil positively impacts its degradability. Here, we seek to test these reports and furthermore to investigate if an interactive effect exists with native soil organic carbon (SOC) concentration. We hypothesised that at a low EOM dose, more EOM remains undecomposed in soil and that this effect becomes stronger at lower SOC level. Moreover, as a secondary goal, we explored if priming of native SOC mineralisation depends on EOM dose. Therefore, we set up seventy-day soil incubation experiments with six varying C4-maize residue (813C = - 12.7 parts per thousand) doses (0-6 g kg- 1) in soil mesocosms of loamy sand subsoils (813C = - 25.7 parts per thousand) with three different native SOC levels (i.e. 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0%). Soil CO2 emissions and isotopic signature measurements of CO2 allowed to discern EOM and SOC mineralisation. We found that EOM-derived C mineralisation increased proportionally to EOM dose, refuting the hypothesised relative undecomposed EOM at low concentration. Volumes of larger pore neck size diameter classes (60-100 and >300 mu m) almost doubled at high EOM dose, demonstrating formation of macropores. Yet, this apparently did not impact EOM mineralisation, probably because O2 supply was always sufficient to allow unlimited activity of EOM degraders, even at higher EOM doses, as indicated by generally higher measured redox potential. With EOM dose, fungal marker PLFA abundances increased in the 1% SOC soil and protozoan abundances increased in all three soils, but apparently these shifts did not result in an enhanced relative degradation of the EOM. Increasing EOM doses induced negative priming, e.g. EOM >= 1 g kg- 1 reduced SOC mineralisation by >43% and >24% compared to the control in the 0.1 and 0.5% SOC soils, respectively; whereas no priming occurred in soil with 1% SOC. These results were largely explained by the amount of added C relative to microbial biomass carbon, and the theorised switch of slow decomposers (so called K-strategists and involved in recalcitrant compound decomposition) from SOM to preferentially decompose EOM at higher doses. We also postulate that at low SOC %, the obvious increased O2 consumption with higher EOM dose more readily results in local anaerobic conditions in finer pores, i.e. where SOC is located and mineralised. We conclude that on the short term, agricultural management for SOM thus does not need to consider EOM doses but only the total amount of EOM.
Keywords
Soil Science, Microbiology, Substrate mineralisation, Exogenous organic matter application rates, Priming effect, Native soil organic carbon, Redox potential, Soil structure, MICROBIAL BIOMASS, INITIAL DECOMPOSITION, COMMUNITY STRUCTURE, EXTRACTION METHOD, N AVAILABILITY, TURNOVER, RESIDUES, NITROGEN, MINERALIZATION, MECHANISMS

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MLA
Mendoza Aguirre, Orly Milton, et al. “Do Interactions between Application Rate and Native Soil Organic Matter Content Determine the Degradation of Exogenous Organic Carbon?” SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY, vol. 164, 2022, doi:10.1016/j.soilbio.2021.108473.
APA
Mendoza Aguirre, O. M., De Neve, S., Deroo, H., Li, H., & Sleutel, S. (2022). Do interactions between application rate and native soil organic matter content determine the degradation of exogenous organic carbon? SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY, 164. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2021.108473
Chicago author-date
Mendoza Aguirre, Orly Milton, Stefaan De Neve, Heleen Deroo, Haichao Li, and Steven Sleutel. 2022. “Do Interactions between Application Rate and Native Soil Organic Matter Content Determine the Degradation of Exogenous Organic Carbon?” SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY 164. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2021.108473.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Mendoza Aguirre, Orly Milton, Stefaan De Neve, Heleen Deroo, Haichao Li, and Steven Sleutel. 2022. “Do Interactions between Application Rate and Native Soil Organic Matter Content Determine the Degradation of Exogenous Organic Carbon?” SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY 164. doi:10.1016/j.soilbio.2021.108473.
Vancouver
1.
Mendoza Aguirre OM, De Neve S, Deroo H, Li H, Sleutel S. Do interactions between application rate and native soil organic matter content determine the degradation of exogenous organic carbon? SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY. 2022;164.
IEEE
[1]
O. M. Mendoza Aguirre, S. De Neve, H. Deroo, H. Li, and S. Sleutel, “Do interactions between application rate and native soil organic matter content determine the degradation of exogenous organic carbon?,” SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY, vol. 164, 2022.
@article{8725615,
  abstract     = {{Although the amendment of various forms of exogenous organic matter (EOM) is a common practice in cropland production, it is to date not clear if its mineralisation in soil depends on application rate. Previous research suggested that spatial concentration of EOM in soil positively impacts its degradability. Here, we seek to test these reports and furthermore to investigate if an interactive effect exists with native soil organic carbon (SOC) concentration. We hypothesised that at a low EOM dose, more EOM remains undecomposed in soil and that this effect becomes stronger at lower SOC level. Moreover, as a secondary goal, we explored if priming of native SOC mineralisation depends on EOM dose. Therefore, we set up seventy-day soil incubation experiments with six varying C4-maize residue (813C = - 12.7 parts per thousand) doses (0-6 g kg- 1) in soil mesocosms of loamy sand subsoils (813C = - 25.7 parts per thousand) with three different native SOC levels (i.e. 0.1, 0.5, and 1.0%). Soil CO2 emissions and isotopic signature measurements of CO2 allowed to discern EOM and SOC mineralisation. We found that EOM-derived C mineralisation increased proportionally to EOM dose, refuting the hypothesised relative undecomposed EOM at low concentration. Volumes of larger pore neck size diameter classes (60-100 and >300 mu m) almost doubled at high EOM dose, demonstrating formation of macropores. Yet, this apparently did not impact EOM mineralisation, probably because O2 supply was always sufficient to allow unlimited activity of EOM degraders, even at higher EOM doses, as indicated by generally higher measured redox potential. With EOM dose, fungal marker PLFA abundances increased in the 1% SOC soil and protozoan abundances increased in all three soils, but apparently these shifts did not result in an enhanced relative degradation of the EOM. Increasing EOM doses induced negative priming, e.g. EOM >= 1 g kg- 1 reduced SOC mineralisation by >43% and >24% compared to the control in the 0.1 and 0.5% SOC soils, respectively; whereas no priming occurred in soil with 1% SOC. These results were largely explained by the amount of added C relative to microbial biomass carbon, and the theorised switch of slow decomposers (so called K-strategists and involved in recalcitrant compound decomposition) from SOM to preferentially decompose EOM at higher doses. We also postulate that at low SOC %, the obvious increased O2 consumption with higher EOM dose more readily results in local anaerobic conditions in finer pores, i.e. where SOC is located and mineralised. We conclude that on the short term, agricultural management for SOM thus does not need to consider EOM doses but only the total amount of EOM.}},
  articleno    = {{108473}},
  author       = {{Mendoza Aguirre, Orly Milton and De Neve, Stefaan and Deroo, Heleen and Li, Haichao and Sleutel, Steven}},
  issn         = {{0038-0717}},
  journal      = {{SOIL BIOLOGY & BIOCHEMISTRY}},
  keywords     = {{Soil Science,Microbiology,Substrate mineralisation,Exogenous organic matter application rates,Priming effect,Native soil organic carbon,Redox potential,Soil structure,MICROBIAL BIOMASS,INITIAL DECOMPOSITION,COMMUNITY STRUCTURE,EXTRACTION METHOD,N AVAILABILITY,TURNOVER,RESIDUES,NITROGEN,MINERALIZATION,MECHANISMS}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{9}},
  title        = {{Do interactions between application rate and native soil organic matter content determine the degradation of exogenous organic carbon?}},
  url          = {{http://doi.org/10.1016/j.soilbio.2021.108473}},
  volume       = {{164}},
  year         = {{2022}},
}

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