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One size doesn’t fit all : a pilot study towards performance-specific speech intervention in children with a cleft (lip and) palate

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Abstract
Purpose. Speech-language pathologists usually apply a “one size fits all” approach to eliminate compensatory cleft speech characteristics (CSCs). It is necessary to investigate what intervention works best for a particular patient. This pilot study compared the effectiveness of two therapy approaches (a motor-phonetic approach and a linguistic-phonological approach) on different subtypes of compensatory CSCs in Dutch-speaking children with a cleft (lip and) palate (CP±L). Methods. Fourteen children with a CP±L (M age = 7.71 years) were divided into two groups using block randomization stratified by age, gender, and type of compensatory CSC. Six children received intervention to eliminate anterior oral CSCs (n = 3 motor-phonetic intervention, n = 3 linguistic-phonological intervention). Eight children received intervention to eliminate non-oral CSCs (n = 4 motor-phonetic intervention, n = 4 linguistic-phonological intervention). Each child received 10 hr of speech intervention divided over 2 weeks. Perceptual and psychosocial outcome measures were used to determine intervention effects. Results. Children who received linguistic-phonological intervention to eliminate anterior oral CSCs had significantly higher correctly produced consonant scores and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) scores compared to children who received motor-phonetic intervention to eliminate anterior oral CSCs. In the group of children who received intervention to eliminate non-oral CSCs, no significant differences were found in the correctly produced consonant scores nor in the HRQoL scores between the two intervention approaches. Conclusions. Linguistic-phonological intervention seems to be more appropriate to eliminate anterior oral CSCs. The beneficial effects of linguistic-phonological intervention were less pronounced in children with non-oral CSCs. Perhaps, children with non-oral CSCs benefit more from a hybrid phonetic-phonological approach. This study is a step forward in the provision of performance-specific intervention in children with a CP±L. Replication in larger samples is needed and will aid to tailor treatment plans to the needs of our patients.
Keywords
QUALITY-OF-LIFE, VELOPHARYNGEAL DYSFUNCTION, AUDIT PROTOCOL, ARTICULATION, DISORDERS, VALIDITY, THERAPY, VELO, RESPONSIVENESS, RELIABILITY

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MLA
Alighieri, Cassandra, et al. “One Size Doesn’t Fit All : A Pilot Study towards Performance-Specific Speech Intervention in Children with a Cleft (Lip and) Palate.” JOURNAL OF SPEECH LANGUAGE AND HEARING RESEARCH, vol. 65, no. 2, 2022, pp. 469–86, doi:10.1044/2021_JSLHR-21-00405.
APA
Alighieri, C., Bettens, K., Bruneel, L., Perry, J., Hens, G., & Van Lierde, K. (2022). One size doesn’t fit all : a pilot study towards performance-specific speech intervention in children with a cleft (lip and) palate. JOURNAL OF SPEECH LANGUAGE AND HEARING RESEARCH, 65(2), 469–486. https://doi.org/10.1044/2021_JSLHR-21-00405
Chicago author-date
Alighieri, Cassandra, Kim Bettens, Laura Bruneel, Jamie Perry, Greet Hens, and Kristiane Van Lierde. 2022. “One Size Doesn’t Fit All : A Pilot Study towards Performance-Specific Speech Intervention in Children with a Cleft (Lip and) Palate.” JOURNAL OF SPEECH LANGUAGE AND HEARING RESEARCH 65 (2): 469–86. https://doi.org/10.1044/2021_JSLHR-21-00405.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Alighieri, Cassandra, Kim Bettens, Laura Bruneel, Jamie Perry, Greet Hens, and Kristiane Van Lierde. 2022. “One Size Doesn’t Fit All : A Pilot Study towards Performance-Specific Speech Intervention in Children with a Cleft (Lip and) Palate.” JOURNAL OF SPEECH LANGUAGE AND HEARING RESEARCH 65 (2): 469–486. doi:10.1044/2021_JSLHR-21-00405.
Vancouver
1.
Alighieri C, Bettens K, Bruneel L, Perry J, Hens G, Van Lierde K. One size doesn’t fit all : a pilot study towards performance-specific speech intervention in children with a cleft (lip and) palate. JOURNAL OF SPEECH LANGUAGE AND HEARING RESEARCH. 2022;65(2):469–86.
IEEE
[1]
C. Alighieri, K. Bettens, L. Bruneel, J. Perry, G. Hens, and K. Van Lierde, “One size doesn’t fit all : a pilot study towards performance-specific speech intervention in children with a cleft (lip and) palate,” JOURNAL OF SPEECH LANGUAGE AND HEARING RESEARCH, vol. 65, no. 2, pp. 469–486, 2022.
@article{8722286,
  abstract     = {{Purpose. Speech-language pathologists usually apply a “one size fits all” approach to eliminate compensatory cleft speech characteristics (CSCs). It is necessary to investigate what intervention works best for a particular patient. This pilot study compared the effectiveness of two therapy approaches (a motor-phonetic approach and a linguistic-phonological approach) on different subtypes of compensatory CSCs in Dutch-speaking children with a cleft (lip and) palate (CP±L). Methods. Fourteen children with a CP±L (M age = 7.71 years) were divided into two groups using block randomization stratified by age, gender, and type of compensatory CSC. Six children received intervention to eliminate anterior oral CSCs (n = 3 motor-phonetic intervention, n = 3 linguistic-phonological intervention). Eight children received intervention to eliminate non-oral CSCs (n = 4 motor-phonetic intervention, n = 4 linguistic-phonological intervention). Each child received 10 hr of speech intervention divided over 2 weeks. Perceptual and psychosocial outcome measures were used to determine intervention effects. Results. Children who received linguistic-phonological intervention to eliminate anterior oral CSCs had significantly higher correctly produced consonant scores and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) scores compared to children who received motor-phonetic intervention to eliminate anterior oral CSCs. In the group of children who received intervention to eliminate non-oral CSCs, no significant differences were found in the correctly produced consonant scores nor in the HRQoL scores between the two intervention approaches. Conclusions. Linguistic-phonological intervention seems to be more appropriate to eliminate anterior oral CSCs. The beneficial effects of linguistic-phonological intervention were less pronounced in children with non-oral CSCs. Perhaps, children with non-oral CSCs benefit more from a hybrid phonetic-phonological approach. This study is a step forward in the provision of performance-specific intervention in children with a CP±L. Replication in larger samples is needed and will aid to tailor treatment plans to the needs of our patients.}},
  author       = {{Alighieri, Cassandra and Bettens, Kim and Bruneel, Laura and Perry, Jamie and Hens, Greet and Van Lierde, Kristiane}},
  issn         = {{1092-4388}},
  journal      = {{JOURNAL OF SPEECH LANGUAGE AND HEARING RESEARCH}},
  keywords     = {{QUALITY-OF-LIFE,VELOPHARYNGEAL DYSFUNCTION,AUDIT PROTOCOL,ARTICULATION,DISORDERS,VALIDITY,THERAPY,VELO,RESPONSIVENESS,RELIABILITY}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{2}},
  pages        = {{469--486}},
  title        = {{One size doesn’t fit all : a pilot study towards performance-specific speech intervention in children with a cleft (lip and) palate}},
  url          = {{http://doi.org/10.1044/2021_JSLHR-21-00405}},
  volume       = {{65}},
  year         = {{2022}},
}

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