Advanced search
1 file | 1.28 MB Add to list

Prevalence and clinical relevance of colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the obstetric population

Author
Organization
Abstract
Background and aims Routine screening for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in pregnant women is common practice in many hospitals. However, little is known on its prevalence and clinical relevance in this population. In this prospective longitudinal study, we aimed to investigate the MRSA prevalence in our obstetric population, the rate of vertical transmission of MRSA and the potential clinical relevance of MRSA colonization for both mother and child. A possible correlation between GBS and MRSA colonization was also investigated. Materials and methods MRSA screening samples were collected at 35-37 weeks of gestation (from mother), at delivery and at discharge (from mother and newborn). All samples were analyzed by conventional microbiological methods and MRSA strains were subjected to spa-typing to investigate genetic similarity. The medical records of all positive mother-child pairs were analyzed to detect the occurrence of clinical infection in the postpartum period. Results 679 mother-child pairs were included between June 2014 and July 2016. Maternal MRSA positivity rate was 1.3% at 35-37 weeks (vaginal/anorectal), 3.1% at delivery (nose/throat) and 3.6% at discharge (nose/throat). MRSA positivity in neonates was 0.3% at delivery and increased to 3% at discharge (nose/umbilicus). Almost all MRSA positive children were born to MRSA positive mothers (OR 120.40, 95% CI: 38.42-377.32). Genetic similarity of the MRSA strains found in mother and child was illustrated for all but one case. 57.7% of the cases of MRSA colonization in our cohort were associated with livestock exposure. 31% of the MRSA positive mothers developed an infectious complication in the postpartum period. No neonatal infectious complications were observed. GBS positivity was not a predictive factor for MRSA colonization in our cohort. Conclusion The rate of MRSA colonization (overall 4.3%) in our obstetric population is similar to that described in the literature and that of the general population admitted to our hospital in the same period. Maternal MRSA colonization appeared to be an important risk factor for neonatal colonization. Whereas mothers were at higher risk of developing infectious morbidity in the postpartum period, no neonatal infectious complications were observed. We observed no correlation between GBS and MRSA colonization.
Keywords
CARRIAGE, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, MRSA, colonization, mother-child, pregnancy, risk factors, GBS

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text (Published version)
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 1.28 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Bauters, Emma, et al. “Prevalence and Clinical Relevance of Colonization with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in the Obstetric Population.” JOURNAL OF MATERNAL-FETAL & NEONATAL MEDICINE, 2022, doi:10.1080/14767058.2021.1966411.
APA
Bauters, E., Jonckheere, S., Dehaene, I., Vandecandelaere, P., Argudin, M. A., & Page, G. (2022). Prevalence and clinical relevance of colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the obstetric population. JOURNAL OF MATERNAL-FETAL & NEONATAL MEDICINE. https://doi.org/10.1080/14767058.2021.1966411
Chicago author-date
Bauters, Emma, Stijn Jonckheere, Isabelle Dehaene, Patricia Vandecandelaere, Maria Angeles Argudin, and Geert Page. 2022. “Prevalence and Clinical Relevance of Colonization with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in the Obstetric Population.” JOURNAL OF MATERNAL-FETAL & NEONATAL MEDICINE. https://doi.org/10.1080/14767058.2021.1966411.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Bauters, Emma, Stijn Jonckheere, Isabelle Dehaene, Patricia Vandecandelaere, Maria Angeles Argudin, and Geert Page. 2022. “Prevalence and Clinical Relevance of Colonization with Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus in the Obstetric Population.” JOURNAL OF MATERNAL-FETAL & NEONATAL MEDICINE. doi:10.1080/14767058.2021.1966411.
Vancouver
1.
Bauters E, Jonckheere S, Dehaene I, Vandecandelaere P, Argudin MA, Page G. Prevalence and clinical relevance of colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the obstetric population. JOURNAL OF MATERNAL-FETAL & NEONATAL MEDICINE. 2022;
IEEE
[1]
E. Bauters, S. Jonckheere, I. Dehaene, P. Vandecandelaere, M. A. Argudin, and G. Page, “Prevalence and clinical relevance of colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the obstetric population,” JOURNAL OF MATERNAL-FETAL & NEONATAL MEDICINE, 2022.
@article{8720574,
  abstract     = {{Background and aims Routine screening for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in pregnant women is common practice in many hospitals. However, little is known on its prevalence and clinical relevance in this population. In this prospective longitudinal study, we aimed to investigate the MRSA prevalence in our obstetric population, the rate of vertical transmission of MRSA and the potential clinical relevance of MRSA colonization for both mother and child. A possible correlation between GBS and MRSA colonization was also investigated. Materials and methods MRSA screening samples were collected at 35-37 weeks of gestation (from mother), at delivery and at discharge (from mother and newborn). All samples were analyzed by conventional microbiological methods and MRSA strains were subjected to spa-typing to investigate genetic similarity. The medical records of all positive mother-child pairs were analyzed to detect the occurrence of clinical infection in the postpartum period. Results 679 mother-child pairs were included between June 2014 and July 2016. Maternal MRSA positivity rate was 1.3% at 35-37 weeks (vaginal/anorectal), 3.1% at delivery (nose/throat) and 3.6% at discharge (nose/throat). MRSA positivity in neonates was 0.3% at delivery and increased to 3% at discharge (nose/umbilicus). Almost all MRSA positive children were born to MRSA positive mothers (OR 120.40, 95% CI: 38.42-377.32). Genetic similarity of the MRSA strains found in mother and child was illustrated for all but one case. 57.7% of the cases of MRSA colonization in our cohort were associated with livestock exposure. 31% of the MRSA positive mothers developed an infectious complication in the postpartum period. No neonatal infectious complications were observed. GBS positivity was not a predictive factor for MRSA colonization in our cohort. Conclusion The rate of MRSA colonization (overall 4.3%) in our obstetric population is similar to that described in the literature and that of the general population admitted to our hospital in the same period. Maternal MRSA colonization appeared to be an important risk factor for neonatal colonization. Whereas mothers were at higher risk of developing infectious morbidity in the postpartum period, no neonatal infectious complications were observed. We observed no correlation between GBS and MRSA colonization.}},
  author       = {{Bauters, Emma and Jonckheere, Stijn and Dehaene, Isabelle and Vandecandelaere, Patricia and Argudin, Maria Angeles and Page, Geert}},
  issn         = {{1476-7058}},
  journal      = {{JOURNAL OF MATERNAL-FETAL & NEONATAL MEDICINE}},
  keywords     = {{CARRIAGE,Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus,MRSA,colonization,mother-child,pregnancy,risk factors,GBS}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{6}},
  title        = {{Prevalence and clinical relevance of colonization with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in the obstetric population}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14767058.2021.1966411}},
  year         = {{2022}},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: