Ghent University Academic Bibliography

Advanced

Healing of extraction sockets filled with BoneCeramic® prior to implant placement: preliminary histological findings

Peter De Coster UGent, HILDE BROWAEYS UGent and Hugo De Bruyn UGent (2011) CLINICAL IMPLANT DENTISTRY AND RELATED RESEARCH. 13(1). p.34-45
abstract
Background: Various grafting materials have been designed to minimize edentulous ridge volume loss following tooth extraction by encouraging new bone formation in healing sockets. BoneCeramic(R) is a composite of hydroxyapatite and bèta-tricalcium phosphate with pores of 100-500 microns. Purposes: The aim of this study was to evaluate bone regeneration in healing sockets substituted with BoneCeramic(R) prior to implant procedures. Materials and Methods: Fifteen extraction sockets were substituted with BoneCeramic(R) and 14 sockets were left to heal naturally in 10 patients (mean age 59.6 years). Biopsies were collected only from the implant recipient sites during surgery after healing periods ranging from 6-74 weeks (mean 22). In total, 24 biopsies were available; 10 from substituted and 14 from naturally healed sites. In one site, the implant was not placed intentionally and, in four substituted sites, implant placement had to be postponed due to inappropriate healing, hence from five sites biopsies were not available. Histological sections were examined by transmitted light microscope. Results: At the time of implant surgery, bone at substituted sites was softer than in controls, compromising initial implant stability. New bone formation at substituted sites was consistently poorer than in controls, presenting predominantly loose connective tissue and less woven bone. Conclusion: The use of BoneCeramic(R) as a grafting material in fresh extraction sockets appears to interfere with normal healing processes of the alveolar bone. On the basis of the present preliminary findings, its indication as a material for bone augmentation when implant placement is considered within 6-38 weeks after extraction should be revised.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
alternative title
Healing of extraction sockets filled with BoneCeramic(R) prior to implant placement : preliminary histological findings
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
journal title
CLINICAL IMPLANT DENTISTRY AND RELATED RESEARCH
Clin. Implant Dent. Relat. Res.
volume
13
issue
1
pages
34 - 45
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000286940900005
JCR category
DENTISTRY, ORAL SURGERY & MEDICINE
JCR impact factor
3.532 (2011)
JCR rank
2/81 (2011)
JCR quartile
1 (2011)
ISSN
1523-0899
DOI
10.1111/j.1708-8208.2009.00184.x
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
872044
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-872044
date created
2010-02-20 21:37:22
date last changed
2011-04-01 11:51:15
@article{872044,
  abstract     = {Background: Various grafting materials have been designed to minimize edentulous ridge volume loss following tooth extraction by encouraging new bone formation in healing sockets. BoneCeramic(R) is a composite of hydroxyapatite and b{\`e}ta-tricalcium phosphate with pores of 100-500 microns.
Purposes: The aim of this study was to evaluate bone regeneration in healing sockets substituted with BoneCeramic(R) prior to implant procedures.
Materials and Methods: Fifteen extraction sockets were substituted with BoneCeramic(R) and 14 sockets were left to heal naturally in 10 patients (mean age 59.6 years). Biopsies were collected only from the implant recipient sites during surgery after healing periods ranging from 6-74 weeks (mean 22). In total, 24 biopsies were available; 10 from substituted and 14 from naturally healed sites. In one site, the implant was not placed intentionally and, in four substituted sites, implant placement had to be postponed due to inappropriate healing, hence from five sites biopsies were not available. Histological sections were examined by transmitted light microscope.
Results: At the time of implant surgery, bone at substituted sites was softer than in controls, compromising initial implant stability. New bone formation at substituted sites was consistently poorer than in controls, presenting predominantly loose connective tissue and less woven bone.
Conclusion: The use of BoneCeramic(R) as a grafting material in fresh extraction sockets appears to interfere with normal healing processes of the alveolar bone. On the basis of the present preliminary findings, its indication as a material for bone augmentation when implant placement is considered within 6-38 weeks after extraction should be revised.},
  author       = {De Coster, Peter and BROWAEYS, HILDE and De Bruyn, Hugo},
  issn         = {1523-0899},
  journal      = {CLINICAL IMPLANT DENTISTRY AND RELATED RESEARCH},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {34--45},
  title        = {Healing of extraction sockets filled with BoneCeramic{\textregistered} prior to implant placement: preliminary histological findings},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1708-8208.2009.00184.x},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2011},
}

Chicago
De Coster, Peter, HILDE BROWAEYS, and Hugo De Bruyn. 2011. “Healing of Extraction Sockets Filled with BoneCeramic® Prior to Implant Placement: Preliminary Histological Findings.” Clinical Implant Dentistry and Related Research 13 (1): 34–45.
APA
De Coster, P., BROWAEYS, H., & De Bruyn, H. (2011). Healing of extraction sockets filled with BoneCeramic® prior to implant placement: preliminary histological findings. CLINICAL IMPLANT DENTISTRY AND RELATED RESEARCH, 13(1), 34–45.
Vancouver
1.
De Coster P, BROWAEYS H, De Bruyn H. Healing of extraction sockets filled with BoneCeramic® prior to implant placement: preliminary histological findings. CLINICAL IMPLANT DENTISTRY AND RELATED RESEARCH. 2011;13(1):34–45.
MLA
De Coster, Peter, HILDE BROWAEYS, and Hugo De Bruyn. “Healing of Extraction Sockets Filled with BoneCeramic® Prior to Implant Placement: Preliminary Histological Findings.” CLINICAL IMPLANT DENTISTRY AND RELATED RESEARCH 13.1 (2011): 34–45. Print.