Advanced search
1 file | 1.22 MB Add to list

Win some, lose some : mesocosm communities maintain community productivity despite lower phosphorus availability because of increased species diversity

Author
Organization
Abstract
Aims: The restoration of degraded ecosystems typically focuses on establishing assemblages of target species, but successful recovery should also be evaluated by the ecosystem's functioning to guarantee long-term persistence. We investigated how the processes underlying community assembly (i.e. species loss, species gain and changes in abundance of resident species) influenced ecosystem functioning in experimental grassland communities in different states of restoration. Location: A greenhouse experiment in northern Flanders, Belgium. Methods: We set up a mesocosm experiment with communities of 19 planted species, ranging from slow-growing species from poorly productive Nardus grasslands to fast-growing species from highly productive Lolium perenne grasslands. We categorised the mesocosms into different grassland restoration states based on known abiotic and biotic restoration barriers for semi-natural grassland restoration: soil phosphorus levels and soil biota communities. After two growing seasons, we used the CAFE approach, an ecological application of the Price equation, to partition the effects of plant community assembly on ecosystem functioning (here community productivity) for the different restoration states. Results: Adding soil biota communities sampled from reference Nardus grasslands vs more intensively managed grasslands did not have a significant effect on either plant species richness or biomass productivity. Lower soil phosphorus concentrations (i.e. abiotic restoration) resulted in a higher plant species richness. However, the net effect on productivity was close to zero. The increase in productivity caused by species gains was compensated through decreases in productivity caused by species loss and by decreases in the abundance or functioning of species that are present in both abiotically degraded and abiotically restored states. Conclusions: Not only species richness but also species identity resulted in changes in ecosystem functioning (i.e. productivity), even though the net functional effects were close to zero. More specifically, we found that species richness-driven increases in productivity were counterbalanced by resource-driven and species identity-driven reductions in productivity.
Keywords
biodiversity, community assembly, ecological restoration, ecosystem function, plant biomass, price equation, primary production, semi-natural grasslands, soil biota, soil phosphorus, species gain, species loss, ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION, SEMINATURAL GRASSLANDS, BIODIVERSITY LOSS, PLANT DIVERSITY, RESTORATION, RICHNESS, NITROGEN, IMPACTS

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text (Published version)
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 1.22 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
DeCock, Eva, et al. “Win Some, Lose Some : Mesocosm Communities Maintain Community Productivity despite Lower Phosphorus Availability Because of Increased Species Diversity.” APPLIED VEGETATION SCIENCE, vol. 24, no. 3, 2021, doi:10.1111/avsc.12599.
APA
DeCock, E., De Schrijver, A., Schelfhout, S., Wasof, S., Vanhellemont, M., Moeneclaey, I., … Baeten, L. (2021). Win some, lose some : mesocosm communities maintain community productivity despite lower phosphorus availability because of increased species diversity. APPLIED VEGETATION SCIENCE, 24(3). https://doi.org/10.1111/avsc.12599
Chicago author-date
DeCock, Eva, An De Schrijver, Stephanie Schelfhout, Safaa Wasof, Margot Vanhellemont, Iris Moeneclaey, Jan Mertens, Kris Verheyen, and Lander Baeten. 2021. “Win Some, Lose Some : Mesocosm Communities Maintain Community Productivity despite Lower Phosphorus Availability Because of Increased Species Diversity.” APPLIED VEGETATION SCIENCE 24 (3). https://doi.org/10.1111/avsc.12599.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
DeCock, Eva, An De Schrijver, Stephanie Schelfhout, Safaa Wasof, Margot Vanhellemont, Iris Moeneclaey, Jan Mertens, Kris Verheyen, and Lander Baeten. 2021. “Win Some, Lose Some : Mesocosm Communities Maintain Community Productivity despite Lower Phosphorus Availability Because of Increased Species Diversity.” APPLIED VEGETATION SCIENCE 24 (3). doi:10.1111/avsc.12599.
Vancouver
1.
DeCock E, De Schrijver A, Schelfhout S, Wasof S, Vanhellemont M, Moeneclaey I, et al. Win some, lose some : mesocosm communities maintain community productivity despite lower phosphorus availability because of increased species diversity. APPLIED VEGETATION SCIENCE. 2021;24(3).
IEEE
[1]
E. DeCock et al., “Win some, lose some : mesocosm communities maintain community productivity despite lower phosphorus availability because of increased species diversity,” APPLIED VEGETATION SCIENCE, vol. 24, no. 3, 2021.
@article{8719917,
  abstract     = {{Aims: The restoration of degraded ecosystems typically focuses on establishing assemblages of target species, but successful recovery should also be evaluated by the ecosystem's functioning to guarantee long-term persistence. We investigated how the processes underlying community assembly (i.e. species loss, species gain and changes in abundance of resident species) influenced ecosystem functioning in experimental grassland communities in different states of restoration.

Location: A greenhouse experiment in northern Flanders, Belgium.

Methods: We set up a mesocosm experiment with communities of 19 planted species, ranging from slow-growing species from poorly productive Nardus grasslands to fast-growing species from highly productive Lolium perenne grasslands. We categorised the mesocosms into different grassland restoration states based on known abiotic and biotic restoration barriers for semi-natural grassland restoration: soil phosphorus levels and soil biota communities. After two growing seasons, we used the CAFE approach, an ecological application of the Price equation, to partition the effects of plant community assembly on ecosystem functioning (here community productivity) for the different restoration states.
Results: Adding soil biota communities sampled from reference Nardus grasslands vs more intensively managed grasslands did not have a significant effect on either plant species richness or biomass productivity. Lower soil phosphorus concentrations (i.e. abiotic restoration) resulted in a higher plant species richness. However, the net effect on productivity was close to zero. The increase in productivity caused by species gains was compensated through decreases in productivity caused by species loss and by decreases in the abundance or functioning of species that are present in both abiotically degraded and abiotically restored states.

Conclusions: Not only species richness but also species identity resulted in changes in ecosystem functioning (i.e. productivity), even though the net functional effects were close to zero. More specifically, we found that species richness-driven increases in productivity were counterbalanced by resource-driven and species identity-driven reductions in productivity.}},
  articleno    = {{e12599}},
  author       = {{DeCock, Eva and De Schrijver, An and Schelfhout, Stephanie and Wasof, Safaa and Vanhellemont, Margot and Moeneclaey, Iris and Mertens, Jan and Verheyen, Kris and Baeten, Lander}},
  issn         = {{1402-2001}},
  journal      = {{APPLIED VEGETATION SCIENCE}},
  keywords     = {{biodiversity,community assembly,ecological restoration,ecosystem function,plant biomass,price equation,primary production,semi-natural grasslands,soil biota,soil phosphorus,species gain,species loss,ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION,SEMINATURAL GRASSLANDS,BIODIVERSITY LOSS,PLANT DIVERSITY,RESTORATION,RICHNESS,NITROGEN,IMPACTS}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{3}},
  pages        = {{11}},
  title        = {{Win some, lose some : mesocosm communities maintain community productivity despite lower phosphorus availability because of increased species diversity}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/avsc.12599}},
  volume       = {{24}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: