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Emulation, imitation & replication? The art of copying in the age of religious reform and artistic progress (ca. 1520-66)

Astrid Harth (UGent)
(2021)
Author
Promoter
(UGent) and (UGent)
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Abstract
The topic of this dissertation is the practice and theory of copying, chiefly in the Netherlands from about 1520 up to the beeldenstorm of 1566. Copying was a multifaceted phenomenon inherent at the time to artistic training, production, consumption and understanding. Whereas in the recent decades the study of the effect of socio-economic factors and of the classical principle of imitation on the phenomenon of copying made inroads in the field of early Netherlandish painting, the impact of religious debates on this reproductive practice of art making still lacks systematic analysis. To address this scientific gap, the dissertation focuses on following research question: how did reformed debates on traditional Christian practices of piety, image devotion and image making affect and shape the creation, commission, and reception of painted copies after religious images? Three case studies were conducted, i.e., (1) painted copies of Antwerp masters produced after Albrecht Dürer’s Saint Jerome painting of 1521, (2) Charles V’s long-term commission of painted copies after Byzantine icons from Titian, Michiel Coxcie and Jan Cornelisz. Vermeyen, and (3) the reception of Michiel Coxcie’s copy of the Ghent Altarpiece in the written discourse on the history of Netherlandish art. Drawing on these three cases studies, the research question was addressed from three different angles: the point of view of the artist, the patron, and the art writer. Each case study provided a piece of the puzzle that helps to advance our current understanding of the impact of reformed debates on the creation, commission, and reception of painted copies of religious imagery in the Netherlands roughly between 1520 and 1566. The main finding is that these debates gave rise to religious consciousness about traditional Christian practices of personal faith and image making in the practice of copying, the commission as well as the literary reception of painted copies.

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MLA
Harth, Astrid. Emulation, Imitation & Replication? The Art of Copying in the Age of Religious Reform and Artistic Progress (ca. 1520-66). Ghent University. Faculty of Arts and Philosophy, 2021.
APA
Harth, A. (2021). Emulation, imitation & replication? The art of copying in the age of religious reform and artistic progress (ca. 1520-66). Ghent University. Faculty of Arts and Philosophy, Ghent, Belgium.
Chicago author-date
Harth, Astrid. 2021. “Emulation, Imitation & Replication? The Art of Copying in the Age of Religious Reform and Artistic Progress (ca. 1520-66).” Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Arts and Philosophy.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Harth, Astrid. 2021. “Emulation, Imitation & Replication? The Art of Copying in the Age of Religious Reform and Artistic Progress (ca. 1520-66).” Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Arts and Philosophy.
Vancouver
1.
Harth A. Emulation, imitation & replication? The art of copying in the age of religious reform and artistic progress (ca. 1520-66). [Ghent, Belgium]: Ghent University. Faculty of Arts and Philosophy; 2021.
IEEE
[1]
A. Harth, “Emulation, imitation & replication? The art of copying in the age of religious reform and artistic progress (ca. 1520-66),” Ghent University. Faculty of Arts and Philosophy, Ghent, Belgium, 2021.
@phdthesis{8719729,
  abstract     = {{The topic of this dissertation is the practice and theory of copying, chiefly in the Netherlands from about 1520 up to the beeldenstorm of 1566. Copying was a multifaceted phenomenon inherent at the time to artistic training, production, consumption and understanding. Whereas in the recent decades the study of the effect of socio-economic factors and of the classical principle of imitation on the phenomenon of copying made inroads in the field of early Netherlandish painting, the impact of religious debates on this reproductive practice of art making still lacks systematic analysis. To address this scientific gap, the dissertation focuses on following research question: how did reformed debates on traditional Christian practices of piety, image devotion and image making affect and shape the creation, commission, and reception of painted copies after religious images? Three case studies were conducted, i.e., (1) painted copies of Antwerp masters produced after Albrecht Dürer’s Saint Jerome painting of 1521, (2) Charles V’s long-term commission of painted copies after Byzantine icons from Titian, Michiel Coxcie and Jan Cornelisz. Vermeyen, and (3) the reception of Michiel Coxcie’s copy of the Ghent Altarpiece in the written discourse on the history of Netherlandish art. Drawing on these three cases studies, the research question was addressed from three different angles: the point of view of the artist, the patron, and the art writer. Each case study provided a piece of the puzzle that helps to advance our current understanding of the impact of reformed debates on the creation, commission, and reception of painted copies of religious imagery in the Netherlands roughly between 1520 and 1566. The main finding is that these debates gave rise to religious consciousness about traditional Christian practices of personal faith and image making in the practice of copying, the commission as well as the literary reception of painted copies.}},
  author       = {{Harth, Astrid}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{IV, 216}},
  publisher    = {{Ghent University. Faculty of Arts and Philosophy}},
  school       = {{Ghent University}},
  title        = {{Emulation, imitation & replication? The art of copying in the age of religious reform and artistic progress (ca. 1520-66)}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}