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Brain SPECT in the behaviourally disordered dog

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Abstract
Dogs can be used as research models in order to contribute to a better understanding of human neuropsychiatric disorders and to explore treatment options. In general, smaller laboratory animals, most often mice and rats, have been extensively used. Nevertheless, the implementation of larger animal (e.g. dogs) models has several important advantages. Their larger brain size omits the need for dedicated equipment (micro-PET or micro-SPECT), and the larger portion of the frontal cortex (crucial to behaviour regulation) in particular allows superior investigation of this area. They can further be used to investigate normal physiology and interaction of several neurotransmitter systems and the effects of drugs on brain function and chemistry. In this regard, they can also be used to obtain information on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of newly developed drugs and the dosage at which maximal response and least side effects occur. Finally, natural animal behavioural models of disorders can be used to enlighten the biological base of several human neuropsychiatric disorders. In this chapter, an overview will be provided on the use of functional brain imaging in dogs suffering from impulsive aggression.
Keywords
Radioligand binding, Canine behavioural disorder, Impulsive aggression, Anxiety, Neuromodulation, Binding index, Translational animal model

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MLA
Dockx, Robrecht, et al. “Brain SPECT in the Behaviourally Disordered Dog.” PET and SPECT in Psychiatry, edited by Rudi A.J.O. Dierckx et al., Springer, 2021, pp. 817–39, doi:10.1007/978-3-030-57231-0_25.
APA
Dockx, R., Baeken, C., Vermeire, S., Waelbers, T., Xu, Y., Dobbeleir, A., … Peremans, K. (2021). Brain SPECT in the behaviourally disordered dog. In R. A. J. O. Dierckx, A. Otte, E. F. J. de Vries, A. van Waarde, & I. E. Sommer (Eds.), PET and SPECT in psychiatry (pp. 817–839). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-57231-0_25
Chicago author-date
Dockx, Robrecht, Chris Baeken, Simon Vermeire, Tim Waelbers, Yangfeng Xu, André Dobbeleir, Kurt Audenaert, and Kathelijne Peremans. 2021. “Brain SPECT in the Behaviourally Disordered Dog.” In PET and SPECT in Psychiatry, edited by Rudi A.J.O. Dierckx, Andreas Otte, Erik F. J. de Vries, Aren van Waarde, and Iris E. Sommer, 817–39. Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-57231-0_25.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Dockx, Robrecht, Chris Baeken, Simon Vermeire, Tim Waelbers, Yangfeng Xu, André Dobbeleir, Kurt Audenaert, and Kathelijne Peremans. 2021. “Brain SPECT in the Behaviourally Disordered Dog.” In PET and SPECT in Psychiatry, ed by. Rudi A.J.O. Dierckx, Andreas Otte, Erik F. J. de Vries, Aren van Waarde, and Iris E. Sommer, 817–839. Cham: Springer. doi:10.1007/978-3-030-57231-0_25.
Vancouver
1.
Dockx R, Baeken C, Vermeire S, Waelbers T, Xu Y, Dobbeleir A, et al. Brain SPECT in the behaviourally disordered dog. In: Dierckx RAJO, Otte A, de Vries EFJ, van Waarde A, Sommer IE, editors. PET and SPECT in psychiatry. Cham: Springer; 2021. p. 817–39.
IEEE
[1]
R. Dockx et al., “Brain SPECT in the behaviourally disordered dog,” in PET and SPECT in psychiatry, R. A. J. O. Dierckx, A. Otte, E. F. J. de Vries, A. van Waarde, and I. E. Sommer, Eds. Cham: Springer, 2021, pp. 817–839.
@incollection{8715037,
  abstract     = {{Dogs can be used as research models in order to contribute to a better understanding of human neuropsychiatric disorders and to explore treatment options. In general, smaller laboratory animals, most often mice and rats, have been extensively used. Nevertheless, the implementation of larger animal (e.g. dogs) models has several important advantages. Their larger brain size omits the need for dedicated equipment (micro-PET or micro-SPECT), and the larger portion of the frontal cortex (crucial to behaviour regulation) in particular allows superior investigation of this area. They can further be used to investigate normal physiology and interaction of several neurotransmitter systems and the effects of drugs on brain function and chemistry. In this regard, they can also be used to obtain information on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of newly developed drugs and the dosage at which maximal response and least side effects occur. Finally, natural animal behavioural models of disorders can be used to enlighten the biological base of several human neuropsychiatric disorders. In this chapter, an overview will be provided on the use of functional brain imaging in dogs suffering from impulsive aggression.}},
  author       = {{Dockx, Robrecht and Baeken, Chris and Vermeire, Simon and Waelbers, Tim and Xu, Yangfeng and Dobbeleir, André and Audenaert, Kurt and Peremans, Kathelijne}},
  booktitle    = {{PET and SPECT in psychiatry}},
  editor       = {{Dierckx, Rudi A.J.O. and Otte, Andreas and de Vries, Erik F. J. and van Waarde, Aren and Sommer, Iris E.}},
  isbn         = {{9783030572303}},
  keywords     = {{Radioligand binding,Canine behavioural disorder,Impulsive aggression,Anxiety,Neuromodulation,Binding index,Translational animal model}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{817--839}},
  publisher    = {{Springer}},
  title        = {{Brain SPECT in the behaviourally disordered dog}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-57231-0_25}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}

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