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Bariatric surgery and the liver : mechanisms, benefits, and risks

(2021) OBESITY REVIEWS. 22(9).
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Abstract
The prevalence of obesity and metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has risen dramatically over the past decades. At present, bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for this global health problem, through effects on food intake, gut hormone secretion, metabolic signaling pathways, and adipose tissue dysfunction. The liver occupies a central role in carbohydrate, protein, and lipid metabolism. Notably, a reduction in hepatic fat content and an improvement in hepatic insulin resistance are among the earliest beneficial effects of bariatric surgery, which has therefore emerged as an attractive treatment option for NAFLD. However, as the scope and popularity of weight loss surgery have expanded, new questions have arisen regarding its safety in patients with liver cirrhosis, the outcome of liver transplantation in patients with a history of bariatric surgery, and over incidental reports of liver failure following surgery. Studies in humans and rodents have also linked bariatric surgery to an increased risk of developing alcohol use disorder, a major risk factor for liver disease. This review integrates data from clinical and translational research to delineate both the beneficial impact of bariatric surgery on the liver and the potential risks involved.
Keywords
Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health, Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, liver transplantation, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, RYGB, sleeve gastrectomy, Y GASTRIC BYPASS, LAPAROSCOPIC SLEEVE GASTRECTOMY, BETA-CELL FUNCTION, 2 ALCOHOLIC DRINKS, WEIGHT-LOSS, OBESE-PATIENTS, GLUCOSE-METABOLISM, INSULIN-RESISTANCE, BILE-ACIDS, NONALCOHOLIC STEATOHEPATITIS

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MLA
Lefere, Sander, et al. “Bariatric Surgery and the Liver : Mechanisms, Benefits, and Risks.” OBESITY REVIEWS, vol. 22, no. 9, 2021, doi:10.1111/obr.13294.
APA
Lefere, S., Onghena, L., Vanlander, A., Van Nieuwenhove, Y., Devisscher, L., & Geerts, A. (2021). Bariatric surgery and the liver : mechanisms, benefits, and risks. OBESITY REVIEWS, 22(9). https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.13294
Chicago author-date
Lefere, Sander, Louis Onghena, Aude Vanlander, Yves Van Nieuwenhove, Lindsey Devisscher, and Anja Geerts. 2021. “Bariatric Surgery and the Liver : Mechanisms, Benefits, and Risks.” OBESITY REVIEWS 22 (9). https://doi.org/10.1111/obr.13294.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Lefere, Sander, Louis Onghena, Aude Vanlander, Yves Van Nieuwenhove, Lindsey Devisscher, and Anja Geerts. 2021. “Bariatric Surgery and the Liver : Mechanisms, Benefits, and Risks.” OBESITY REVIEWS 22 (9). doi:10.1111/obr.13294.
Vancouver
1.
Lefere S, Onghena L, Vanlander A, Van Nieuwenhove Y, Devisscher L, Geerts A. Bariatric surgery and the liver : mechanisms, benefits, and risks. OBESITY REVIEWS. 2021;22(9).
IEEE
[1]
S. Lefere, L. Onghena, A. Vanlander, Y. Van Nieuwenhove, L. Devisscher, and A. Geerts, “Bariatric surgery and the liver : mechanisms, benefits, and risks,” OBESITY REVIEWS, vol. 22, no. 9, 2021.
@article{8711381,
  abstract     = {{The prevalence of obesity and metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has risen dramatically over the past decades. At present, bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for this global health problem, through effects on food intake, gut hormone secretion, metabolic signaling pathways, and adipose tissue dysfunction. The liver occupies a central role in carbohydrate, protein, and lipid metabolism. Notably, a reduction in hepatic fat content and an improvement in hepatic insulin resistance are among the earliest beneficial effects of bariatric surgery, which has therefore emerged as an attractive treatment option for NAFLD. However, as the scope and popularity of weight loss surgery have expanded, new questions have arisen regarding its safety in patients with liver cirrhosis, the outcome of liver transplantation in patients with a history of bariatric surgery, and over incidental reports of liver failure following surgery. Studies in humans and rodents have also linked bariatric surgery to an increased risk of developing alcohol use disorder, a major risk factor for liver disease. This review integrates data from clinical and translational research to delineate both the beneficial impact of bariatric surgery on the liver and the potential risks involved.}},
  articleno    = {{e13294}},
  author       = {{Lefere, Sander and Onghena, Louis and Vanlander, Aude and Van Nieuwenhove, Yves and Devisscher, Lindsey and Geerts, Anja}},
  issn         = {{1467-7881}},
  journal      = {{OBESITY REVIEWS}},
  keywords     = {{Public Health,Environmental and Occupational Health,Endocrinology,Diabetes and Metabolism,liver transplantation,nonalcoholic fatty liver disease,RYGB,sleeve gastrectomy,Y GASTRIC BYPASS,LAPAROSCOPIC SLEEVE GASTRECTOMY,BETA-CELL FUNCTION,2 ALCOHOLIC DRINKS,WEIGHT-LOSS,OBESE-PATIENTS,GLUCOSE-METABOLISM,INSULIN-RESISTANCE,BILE-ACIDS,NONALCOHOLIC STEATOHEPATITIS}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{9}},
  pages        = {{12}},
  title        = {{Bariatric surgery and the liver : mechanisms, benefits, and risks}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/obr.13294}},
  volume       = {{22}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}

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