Advanced search
1 file | 593.40 KB Add to list

Yes, Prime Minister (bis): prosecution for satirical collage criticising Turkish prime minister’s foreign policy violated artist’s freedom of expression

Author
Organization
Abstract
On 2 February 2021, the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) unanimously found that the criminal proceedings against an artist’s satirical collage ‘insulting’ the Turkish Prime Minister violated his right to freedom of expression under Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). In an earlier case (Tuşalp v. Turkey) about press articles criticising the then Prime Minister, Mr. Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, the ECtHR also concluded that the Turkish authorities had disproportionately interfered with freedom of political expression, by overprotecting the reputation of the Prime Minister (see our blog entitled ‘Yes Prime Minister!’ here). In its latest judgment in Dickinson v. Turkey the ECtHR confirms that a politician must show a greater tolerance towards criticism, especially when the expression takes the form of satire. Most importantly, the ECtHR found that Article 10 was violated, even where the applicant has ‘only’ been criminally prosecuted, without any sanction being imposed. The ECtHR considers that being prosecuted for insult of a political leader, with a risk of being imprisoned, has a chilling effect on the right to freedom of expression.
Keywords
Freedom of expression, political expression, satire

Downloads

  • SOBlog.Dickenson v Turkey.2021.DV.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 593.40 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Voorhoof, Dirk, and Ronan 0 Fathaigh. “Yes, Prime Minister (Bis): Prosecution for Satirical Collage Criticising Turkish Prime Minister’s Foreign Policy Violated Artist’s Freedom of Expression.” Strasbourg Observers Blog, Human Rights Centre Ghent University, 2021.
APA
Voorhoof, D., & 0 Fathaigh, R. (2021). Yes, Prime Minister (bis): prosecution for satirical collage criticising Turkish prime minister’s foreign policy violated artist’s freedom of expression. Strasbourg Observers Blog. Gent: Human Rights Centre Ghent University.
Chicago author-date
Voorhoof, Dirk, and Ronan 0 Fathaigh. 2021. “Yes, Prime Minister (Bis): Prosecution for Satirical Collage Criticising Turkish Prime Minister’s Foreign Policy Violated Artist’s Freedom of Expression.” Strasbourg Observers Blog. Gent: Human Rights Centre Ghent University.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Voorhoof, Dirk, and Ronan 0 Fathaigh. 2021. “Yes, Prime Minister (Bis): Prosecution for Satirical Collage Criticising Turkish Prime Minister’s Foreign Policy Violated Artist’s Freedom of Expression.” Strasbourg Observers Blog. Gent: Human Rights Centre Ghent University.
Vancouver
1.
Voorhoof D, 0 Fathaigh R. Yes, Prime Minister (bis): prosecution for satirical collage criticising Turkish prime minister’s foreign policy violated artist’s freedom of expression. Strasbourg Observers Blog. Gent: Human Rights Centre Ghent University; 2021.
IEEE
[1]
D. Voorhoof and R. 0 Fathaigh, “Yes, Prime Minister (bis): prosecution for satirical collage criticising Turkish prime minister’s foreign policy violated artist’s freedom of expression,” Strasbourg Observers Blog. Human Rights Centre Ghent University, Gent, 2021.
@misc{8708148,
  abstract     = {{On 2 February 2021, the European Court of Human Rights (ECtHR) unanimously found that the criminal proceedings against an artist’s satirical collage ‘insulting’ the Turkish Prime Minister violated his right to freedom of expression under Article 10 of the European Convention on Human Rights (ECHR). In an earlier case (Tuşalp v. Turkey) about press articles criticising the then Prime Minister, Mr. Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, the ECtHR also concluded that the Turkish authorities had disproportionately interfered with freedom of political expression, by overprotecting the reputation of the Prime Minister (see our blog entitled ‘Yes Prime Minister!’ here). In its latest judgment in Dickinson v. Turkey the ECtHR confirms that a politician must show a greater tolerance towards criticism, especially when the expression takes the form of satire. Most importantly, the ECtHR found that Article 10 was violated, even where the applicant has ‘only’ been criminally prosecuted, without any sanction being imposed. The ECtHR considers that being prosecuted for insult of a political leader, with a risk of being imprisoned, has a chilling effect on the right to freedom of expression.}},
  author       = {{Voorhoof, Dirk and 0 Fathaigh, Ronan}},
  keywords     = {{Freedom of expression,political expression,satire}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{5}},
  publisher    = {{Human Rights Centre Ghent University}},
  series       = {{Strasbourg Observers Blog}},
  title        = {{Yes, Prime Minister (bis): prosecution for satirical collage criticising Turkish prime minister’s foreign policy violated artist’s freedom of expression}},
  url          = {{https://strasbourgobservers.com/2021/03/19/yes-prime-minister-bis-prosecution-for-satirical-collage-criticising-turkish-prime-ministers-foreign-policy-violated-artists-freedom-of-expression/}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}