Advanced search
1 file | 1.05 MB Add to list

High-speed laser-scanning microscopy for single-nanoparticle tracking velocimetry

Lucas Oorlynck (UGent) , Yera Ussembayev (UGent) and Filip Strubbe (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Nanoparticle tracking velocimetry can be used to measure the hydrodynamic size and the electrophoretic mobility of individual nanoparticles in polydisperse samples, by analyzing their Brownian motion and electrophoretic motion in an electric field as a function of time. However, typical particle tracking techniques use a high-speed camera limited in acquisition rate and optical sensitivity by the image sensor [1]. In this work, we present nanoparticle tracking velocimetry of fluorescently labeled nanoparticles in a microfluidic channel, using a high-speed laser-scanning microscope and a photon counter, similar as used in ABEL-trap configurations [2]. By using an FPGA, in a synchronized way a continuous-wave 532 nm laser is scanned over a grid of pixels in the focal plane, using acousto-optic-deflectors while the photons emitted from the nanoparticle under test are detected with a photon counter (see Fig. 1a). As a result, optical images can be reconstructed (b) and the particle’s location can be analyzed over time (c). The advantage of the laser scanning system is that a higher local power density is reached to excite the fluorescence compared to traditional fluorescence illumination, such that smaller nanoparticles can be tracked at higher frame rates limited by the photon statistics of the fluorescence molecules and laser scanning speed. It is demonstrated how the electrophoretic mobility and diffusion coefficient of nanoparticles are extracted from the reconstructed images.
Keywords
Nanoparticles, Particle Tracking, Electrophoresis, Laser Microscopy, Microfluidics

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text (Published version)
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 1.05 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Oorlynck, Lucas, et al. “High-Speed Laser-Scanning Microscopy for Single-Nanoparticle Tracking Velocimetry.” ECIS 2021, 35th Conference of the European Colloid & Interface Society, Abstracts, 2021.
APA
Oorlynck, L., Ussembayev, Y., & Strubbe, F. (2021). High-speed laser-scanning microscopy for single-nanoparticle tracking velocimetry. In ECIS 2021, 35th Conference of the European Colloid & Interface Society, Abstracts. Athens, Greece.
Chicago author-date
Oorlynck, Lucas, Yera Ussembayev, and Filip Strubbe. 2021. “High-Speed Laser-Scanning Microscopy for Single-Nanoparticle Tracking Velocimetry.” In ECIS 2021, 35th Conference of the European Colloid & Interface Society, Abstracts.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Oorlynck, Lucas, Yera Ussembayev, and Filip Strubbe. 2021. “High-Speed Laser-Scanning Microscopy for Single-Nanoparticle Tracking Velocimetry.” In ECIS 2021, 35th Conference of the European Colloid & Interface Society, Abstracts.
Vancouver
1.
Oorlynck L, Ussembayev Y, Strubbe F. High-speed laser-scanning microscopy for single-nanoparticle tracking velocimetry. In: ECIS 2021, 35th Conference of the European Colloid & Interface Society, Abstracts. 2021.
IEEE
[1]
L. Oorlynck, Y. Ussembayev, and F. Strubbe, “High-speed laser-scanning microscopy for single-nanoparticle tracking velocimetry,” in ECIS 2021, 35th Conference of the European Colloid & Interface Society, Abstracts, Athens, Greece, 2021.
@inproceedings{8707635,
  abstract     = {{Nanoparticle tracking velocimetry can be used to measure the hydrodynamic size and the electrophoretic mobility of individual nanoparticles in polydisperse samples, by analyzing their Brownian motion and electrophoretic motion in an electric field as a function of time. However, typical particle tracking techniques use a high-speed camera limited in acquisition rate and optical sensitivity by the image sensor [1].
In this work, we present nanoparticle tracking velocimetry of fluorescently labeled nanoparticles in a microfluidic channel, using a high-speed laser-scanning microscope and a photon counter, similar as used in ABEL-trap configurations [2].
By using an FPGA, in a synchronized way a continuous-wave 532 nm laser is scanned over a grid of pixels in the focal plane, using acousto-optic-deflectors while the photons emitted from the nanoparticle under test are detected with a photon counter (see Fig. 1a). As a result, optical images can be reconstructed (b) and the particle’s location can be analyzed over time (c).
The advantage of the laser scanning system is that a higher local power density is reached to excite the fluorescence compared to traditional fluorescence illumination, such that smaller nanoparticles can be tracked at higher frame rates limited by the photon statistics of the fluorescence molecules and laser scanning speed. It is demonstrated how the electrophoretic mobility and diffusion coefficient of nanoparticles are extracted from the reconstructed images.}},
  author       = {{Oorlynck, Lucas and Ussembayev, Yera and Strubbe, Filip}},
  booktitle    = {{ECIS 2021, 35th Conference of the European Colloid & Interface Society, Abstracts}},
  keywords     = {{Nanoparticles,Particle Tracking,Electrophoresis,Laser Microscopy,Microfluidics}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  location     = {{Athens, Greece}},
  pages        = {{1}},
  title        = {{High-speed laser-scanning microscopy for single-nanoparticle tracking velocimetry}},
  url          = {{https://www.ecis2021.org}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}