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A socially assistive robot for long-term cardiac rehabilitation in the real world

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Abstract
What are the benefits of using a socially assistive robot for long-term cardiac rehabilitation? To answer this question we designed and conducted a real-world long-term study, in collaboration with medical specialists, at the Fundacion Cardioinfantil-Instituto de Cardiologia clinic (Bogota, Colombia) lasting 2.5 years. The study took place within the context of the outpatient phase of patients' cardiac rehabilitation programme and aimed to compare the patients' progress and adherence in the conventional cardiac rehabilitation programme (control condition) against rehabilitation supported by a fully autonomous socially assistive robot which continuously monitored the patients during exercise to provide immediate feedback and motivation based on sensory measures (robot condition). The explicit aim of the social robot is to improve patient motivation and increase adherence to the programme to ensure a complete recovery. We recruited 15 patients per condition. The cardiac rehabilitation programme was designed to last 36 sessions (18 weeks) per patient. The findings suggest that robot increases adherence (by 13.3%) and leads to faster completion of the programme. In addition, the patients assisted by the robot had more rapid improvement in their recovery heart rate, better physical activity performance and a higher improvement in cardiovascular functioning, which indicate a successful cardiac rehabilitation programme performance. Moreover, the medical staff and the patients acknowledged that the robot improved the patient motivation and adherence to the programme, supporting its potential in addressing the major challenges in rehabilitation programmes.
Keywords
social assistive robotics, cardiac rehabilitation, human-robot interaction, long-term interaction, social robot, human-robot interface

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MLA
Cespedes, Nathalia, et al. “A Socially Assistive Robot for Long-Term Cardiac Rehabilitation in the Real World.” FRONTIERS IN NEUROROBOTICS, vol. 15, 2021, doi:10.3389/fnbot.2021.633248.
APA
Cespedes, N., Irfan, B., Senft, E., Cifuentes, C. A., Gutierrez, L. F., Rincon-Roncancio, M., … Munera, M. (2021). A socially assistive robot for long-term cardiac rehabilitation in the real world. FRONTIERS IN NEUROROBOTICS, 15. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnbot.2021.633248
Chicago author-date
Cespedes, Nathalia, Bahar Irfan, Emmanuel Senft, Carlos A. Cifuentes, Luisa F. Gutierrez, Monica Rincon-Roncancio, Tony Belpaeme, and Marcela Munera. 2021. “A Socially Assistive Robot for Long-Term Cardiac Rehabilitation in the Real World.” FRONTIERS IN NEUROROBOTICS 15. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnbot.2021.633248.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Cespedes, Nathalia, Bahar Irfan, Emmanuel Senft, Carlos A. Cifuentes, Luisa F. Gutierrez, Monica Rincon-Roncancio, Tony Belpaeme, and Marcela Munera. 2021. “A Socially Assistive Robot for Long-Term Cardiac Rehabilitation in the Real World.” FRONTIERS IN NEUROROBOTICS 15. doi:10.3389/fnbot.2021.633248.
Vancouver
1.
Cespedes N, Irfan B, Senft E, Cifuentes CA, Gutierrez LF, Rincon-Roncancio M, et al. A socially assistive robot for long-term cardiac rehabilitation in the real world. FRONTIERS IN NEUROROBOTICS. 2021;15.
IEEE
[1]
N. Cespedes et al., “A socially assistive robot for long-term cardiac rehabilitation in the real world,” FRONTIERS IN NEUROROBOTICS, vol. 15, 2021.
@article{8706098,
  abstract     = {{What are the benefits of using a socially assistive robot for long-term cardiac rehabilitation? To answer this question we designed and conducted a real-world long-term study, in collaboration with medical specialists, at the Fundacion Cardioinfantil-Instituto de Cardiologia clinic (Bogota, Colombia) lasting 2.5 years. The study took place within the context of the outpatient phase of patients' cardiac rehabilitation programme and aimed to compare the patients' progress and adherence in the conventional cardiac rehabilitation programme (control condition) against rehabilitation supported by a fully autonomous socially assistive robot which continuously monitored the patients during exercise to provide immediate feedback and motivation based on sensory measures (robot condition). The explicit aim of the social robot is to improve patient motivation and increase adherence to the programme to ensure a complete recovery. We recruited 15 patients per condition. The cardiac rehabilitation programme was designed to last 36 sessions (18 weeks) per patient. The findings suggest that robot increases adherence (by 13.3%) and leads to faster completion of the programme. In addition, the patients assisted by the robot had more rapid improvement in their recovery heart rate, better physical activity performance and a higher improvement in cardiovascular functioning, which indicate a successful cardiac rehabilitation programme performance. Moreover, the medical staff and the patients acknowledged that the robot improved the patient motivation and adherence to the programme, supporting its potential in addressing the major challenges in rehabilitation programmes.}},
  articleno    = {{633248}},
  author       = {{Cespedes, Nathalia and Irfan, Bahar and Senft, Emmanuel and Cifuentes, Carlos A. and Gutierrez, Luisa F. and Rincon-Roncancio, Monica and Belpaeme, Tony and Munera, Marcela}},
  issn         = {{1662-5218}},
  journal      = {{FRONTIERS IN NEUROROBOTICS}},
  keywords     = {{social assistive robotics,cardiac rehabilitation,human-robot interaction,long-term interaction,social robot,human-robot interface}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{19}},
  title        = {{A socially assistive robot for long-term cardiac rehabilitation in the real world}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnbot.2021.633248}},
  volume       = {{15}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}

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