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Culture and emotions in the medical encounter

Author
Organization
Abstract
Over the past two decades, people have migrated to and from various places in the world at an unprecedented pace, leading to a heterogeneous mix of cultures within each country that requires healthcare providers to sensitively navigate cultural nuances in order to effectively deliver medical care. Today, there are about 272 million migrants worldwide—51 million more than just 10 years ago—which is approximately 3.5% of the world’s population. This means that healthcare providers now are working in a superdiverse society, with patients and clients who come from very different sociocultural backgrounds. Furthermore, many countries, such as the United States and much of Europe, are already highly diverse due to their historical development. For the local healthcare system, and in particular primary healthcare services, which are often the first point of contact in the healthcare system, this social and cultural mixture of people entails many challenges and has direct implications when it comes to effectively navigating emotional communication during patient encounters. Recognizing and responding effectively to patients’ emotions has proven difficult for many providers, even when they share a similar cultural background with their patient. Addressing emotions in an ethnically and/or culturally discordant context is an even greater challenge in practice. Therefore, the focus of this chapter will be on strategies for successfully identifying, engaging with, and appropriately responding to cultural barriers that affect emotional communication during medical encounters.
Keywords
Culture, cultural norms, racial, ethnic, emotion, emotion expression, stereotypes, racism, bias, language, language barriers, language interpretation, mindfulness, mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR), patient-centered, reflective attitude, cross-cultural, cultural humility, limited English proficiency, language concordance

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Aelbrecht, Karolien, and Mary Catherine Beach. “Culture and Emotions in the Medical Encounter.” Emotion in the Clinical Encounter, edited by Rachel Schwartz et al., McGraw Hill, 2021.
APA
Aelbrecht, K., & Beach, M. C. (2021). Culture and emotions in the medical encounter. In R. Schwartz, J. Hall, & L. Osterberg (Eds.), Emotion in the clinical encounter. McGraw Hill.
Chicago author-date
Aelbrecht, Karolien, and Mary Catherine Beach. 2021. “Culture and Emotions in the Medical Encounter.” In Emotion in the Clinical Encounter, edited by Rachel Schwartz, Judith Hall, and Lars Osterberg. McGraw Hill.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Aelbrecht, Karolien, and Mary Catherine Beach. 2021. “Culture and Emotions in the Medical Encounter.” In Emotion in the Clinical Encounter, ed by. Rachel Schwartz, Judith Hall, and Lars Osterberg. McGraw Hill.
Vancouver
1.
Aelbrecht K, Beach MC. Culture and emotions in the medical encounter. In: Schwartz R, Hall J, Osterberg L, editors. Emotion in the clinical encounter. McGraw Hill; 2021.
IEEE
[1]
K. Aelbrecht and M. C. Beach, “Culture and emotions in the medical encounter,” in Emotion in the clinical encounter, R. Schwartz, J. Hall, and L. Osterberg, Eds. McGraw Hill, 2021.
@incollection{8705718,
  abstract     = {{Over the past two decades, people have migrated to and from various places
in the world at an unprecedented pace, leading to a heterogeneous mix of
cultures within each country that requires healthcare providers to sensitively
navigate cultural nuances in order to effectively deliver medical care. Today,
there are about 272 million migrants worldwide—51 million more than just
10 years ago—which is approximately 3.5% of the world’s population. This
means that healthcare providers now are working in a superdiverse society,
with patients and clients who come from very different sociocultural backgrounds.
Furthermore, many countries, such as the United States and much
of Europe, are already highly diverse due to their historical development. For
the local healthcare system, and in particular primary healthcare services,
which are often the first point of contact in the healthcare system, this social
and cultural mixture of people entails many challenges and has direct implications
when it comes to effectively navigating emotional communication
during patient encounters.
Recognizing and responding effectively to patients’ emotions has
proven difficult for many providers, even when they share a similar cultural
background with their patient. Addressing emotions in an ethnically
and/or culturally discordant context is an even greater challenge in practice.
Therefore, the focus of this chapter will be on strategies for successfully identifying,
engaging with, and appropriately responding to cultural barriers that
affect emotional communication during medical encounters.}},
  author       = {{Aelbrecht, Karolien and Beach, Mary Catherine}},
  booktitle    = {{Emotion in the clinical encounter}},
  editor       = {{Schwartz, Rachel and Hall, Judith and Osterberg, Lars}},
  isbn         = {{9781260464320}},
  keywords     = {{Culture,cultural norms,racial,ethnic,emotion,emotion expression,stereotypes,racism,bias,language,language barriers,language interpretation,mindfulness,mindfulness based stress reduction (MBSR),patient-centered,reflective attitude,cross-cultural,cultural humility,limited English proficiency,language concordance}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  publisher    = {{McGraw Hill}},
  title        = {{Culture and emotions in the medical encounter}},
  year         = {{2021}},
}