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Balancing selection at the ATP binding site of heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70) contributes to increased thermotolerance in Artemia franciscana

(2021) AQUACULTURE. 531.
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Abstract
A number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) family genes have been reported to be associated with stress tolerance. In this study, the presence of SNPs in either the ArHSP70 and ArHSC70 genes (heat shock cognate gene) was verified in 2 Artemia franciscana populations, either a control population (CF12) or a population selectively bred for increased induced thermotolerance (TF12) over 12 generations. In TF12 animals, a novel non-synonymous SNP was identified at position 171 of the cDNA (C171A; N57K; in the ATP/ADP binding site) in ArHSC70 but not in ArHSP70. Cloning and expression of the 2 allelic forms in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) confirmed that yeast cells containing an ArHSC70-N57K plasmid could tolerate higher temperatures than yeast cells containing an ArHSC70-wild type plasmid. This strongly suggests that the SNP at C171A (N57K) increases thermotolerance of the TF12 A. franciscana population. Upon analysis of individuals of the CF12 and TF12 populations it appears that the C171A allele frequency increased substantially in the TF12 population. Both populations appear not to be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, with CF12 displaying an apparent lack of heterozygotes, while the TF12 displays a large excess of heterozygotes. It is argued that these observations are a novel case of balancing selection. As such, HSP genes join a group of immune related genes where balancing selection contributes to population fitness.
Keywords
DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER, EVOLUTION, HSP70, POLYMORPHISM, POPULATIONS, ASSOCIATION, LOCUS, MHC, Balancing selection, Heat shock cognate 70, Selective breeding, Thermotolerance, Artemia franciscana

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MLA
Junprung, Wisarut, et al. “Balancing Selection at the ATP Binding Site of Heat Shock Cognate 70 (HSC70) Contributes to Increased Thermotolerance in Artemia Franciscana.” AQUACULTURE, vol. 531, 2021, doi:10.1016/j.aquaculture.2020.735988.
APA
Junprung, W., Supungul, P., Tassanakajon, A., Van Stappen, G., & Bossier, P. (2021). Balancing selection at the ATP binding site of heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70) contributes to increased thermotolerance in Artemia franciscana. AQUACULTURE, 531. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aquaculture.2020.735988
Chicago author-date
Junprung, Wisarut, Premruethai Supungul, Anchalee Tassanakajon, Gilbert Van Stappen, and Peter Bossier. 2021. “Balancing Selection at the ATP Binding Site of Heat Shock Cognate 70 (HSC70) Contributes to Increased Thermotolerance in Artemia Franciscana.” AQUACULTURE 531. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.aquaculture.2020.735988.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Junprung, Wisarut, Premruethai Supungul, Anchalee Tassanakajon, Gilbert Van Stappen, and Peter Bossier. 2021. “Balancing Selection at the ATP Binding Site of Heat Shock Cognate 70 (HSC70) Contributes to Increased Thermotolerance in Artemia Franciscana.” AQUACULTURE 531. doi:10.1016/j.aquaculture.2020.735988.
Vancouver
1.
Junprung W, Supungul P, Tassanakajon A, Van Stappen G, Bossier P. Balancing selection at the ATP binding site of heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70) contributes to increased thermotolerance in Artemia franciscana. AQUACULTURE. 2021;531.
IEEE
[1]
W. Junprung, P. Supungul, A. Tassanakajon, G. Van Stappen, and P. Bossier, “Balancing selection at the ATP binding site of heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70) contributes to increased thermotolerance in Artemia franciscana,” AQUACULTURE, vol. 531, 2021.
@article{8697858,
  abstract     = {A number of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) family genes have been reported to be associated with stress tolerance. In this study, the presence of SNPs in either the ArHSP70 and ArHSC70 genes (heat shock cognate gene) was verified in 2 Artemia franciscana populations, either a control population (CF12) or a population selectively bred for increased induced thermotolerance (TF12) over 12 generations. In TF12 animals, a novel non-synonymous SNP was identified at position 171 of the cDNA (C171A; N57K; in the ATP/ADP binding site) in ArHSC70 but not in ArHSP70. Cloning and expression of the 2 allelic forms in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) confirmed that yeast cells containing an ArHSC70-N57K plasmid could tolerate higher temperatures than yeast cells containing an ArHSC70-wild type plasmid. This strongly suggests that the SNP at C171A (N57K) increases thermotolerance of the TF12 A. franciscana population. Upon analysis of individuals of the CF12 and TF12 populations it appears that the C171A allele frequency increased substantially in the TF12 population. Both populations appear not to be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium, with CF12 displaying an apparent lack of heterozygotes, while the TF12 displays a large excess of heterozygotes. It is argued that these observations are a novel case of balancing selection. As such, HSP genes join a group of immune related genes where balancing selection contributes to population fitness.},
  articleno    = {735988},
  author       = {Junprung, Wisarut and Supungul, Premruethai and Tassanakajon, Anchalee and Van Stappen, Gilbert and Bossier, Peter},
  issn         = {0044-8486},
  journal      = {AQUACULTURE},
  keywords     = {DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER,EVOLUTION,HSP70,POLYMORPHISM,POPULATIONS,ASSOCIATION,LOCUS,MHC,Balancing selection,Heat shock cognate 70,Selective breeding,Thermotolerance,Artemia franciscana},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {7},
  title        = {Balancing selection at the ATP binding site of heat shock cognate 70 (HSC70) contributes to increased thermotolerance in Artemia franciscana},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.aquaculture.2020.735988},
  volume       = {531},
  year         = {2021},
}

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