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This chapter first defines national accounting and, next, briefly discusses early developments in estimating national income and the transition to national accounting. Systems of national accounts developed mainly after the Second World War. International harmonisation became stronger in the 1990s. More recent developments focus on attempts to integrate other types of capital in the national accounts, such as natural capital and human capital. As national accounting provides macroeconomic information, it could be expected that there would be an interaction between economists and accountants. However, this interaction has been limited, and only from the 1940s are initiatives identified that brought together both professions. The current situation is characterised by an almost complete separation between these groups. National accounting developed in different ways across different countries. To a large extent, this can be linked to the political aspects of national accounting and different opinions on the economic role of governments. Governments that directly control economic life have a considerable impact on the broad area of accounting, but also favour systems that directly link micro-level and macro-level accounting. This leads us to exploring the relationship between both levels. Accounting traditions that favour the use of standardised charts of accounts make integration easier. However, differences in concepts and valuation frameworks continue to make this a difficult task. The chapter concludes with a number of suggestions for future research
Keywords
accounting, accounting history

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MLA
De Beelde, Ignace. “National Accounting.” The Routledge Companion to Accounting History, edited by John R. Edwards and Stephen P. Walker, 2nd ed., Routledge, 2020, pp. 466–81.
APA
De Beelde, I. (2020). National accounting. In J. R. Edwards & S. P. Walker (Eds.), The Routledge companion to accounting history (2nd ed., pp. 466–481). Routledge.
Chicago author-date
De Beelde, Ignace. 2020. “National Accounting.” In The Routledge Companion to Accounting History, edited by John R. Edwards and Stephen P. Walker, 2nd ed., 466–81. Routledge.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
De Beelde, Ignace. 2020. “National Accounting.” In The Routledge Companion to Accounting History, ed by. John R. Edwards and Stephen P. Walker, 466–481. 2nd ed. Routledge.
Vancouver
1.
De Beelde I. National accounting. In: Edwards JR, Walker SP, editors. The Routledge companion to accounting history. 2nd ed. Routledge; 2020. p. 466–81.
IEEE
[1]
I. De Beelde, “National accounting,” in The Routledge companion to accounting history, 2nd ed., J. R. Edwards and S. P. Walker, Eds. Routledge, 2020, pp. 466–481.
@incollection{8696973,
  abstract     = {{This chapter first defines national accounting and, next, briefly discusses early developments
in estimating national income and the transition to national accounting. Systems of national
accounts developed mainly after the Second World War. International harmonisation
became stronger in the 1990s. More recent developments focus on attempts to integrate
other types of capital in the national accounts, such as natural capital and human capital.
As national accounting provides macroeconomic information, it could be expected that
there would be an interaction between economists and accountants. However, this
interaction has been limited, and only from the 1940s are initiatives identified that brought
together both professions. The current situation is characterised by an almost complete
separation between these groups.
National accounting developed in different ways across different countries. To a large
extent, this can be linked to the political aspects of national accounting and different
opinions on the economic role of governments. Governments that directly control
economic life have a considerable impact on the broad area of accounting, but also favour
systems that directly link micro-level and macro-level accounting.
This leads us to exploring the relationship between both levels. Accounting traditions
that favour the use of standardised charts of accounts make integration easier. However,
differences in concepts and valuation frameworks continue to make this a difficult task. The
chapter concludes with a number of suggestions for future research}},
  author       = {{De Beelde, Ignace}},
  booktitle    = {{The Routledge companion to accounting history}},
  editor       = {{Edwards, John R. and Walker, Stephen P.}},
  isbn         = {{9780815375869}},
  keywords     = {{accounting,accounting history}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{466--481}},
  publisher    = {{Routledge}},
  series       = {{Routledge Companions in Business, Management and Marketing}},
  title        = {{National accounting}},
  year         = {{2020}},
}