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Memories of 100 years of human fear conditioning research and expectations for its future

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Abstract
This special issue celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Little Albert study, published in February 1920, which marked the birth of human fear conditioning research. The collection of papers in this special issue provides a snapshot of the thriving state of this field today. In this Editorial, we first trace the historical roots of the field and then provide a conceptual analysis of the many ways in which human fear conditioning is currently used in theory and treatment development, with special reference to the contributions in this special issue. Ivan P. Pavlov allegedly claimed that "If you want new ideas, read old books". We could not agree more; it is our conviction that tracing the roots of our field illuminates current trends and will contribute to shaping new directions for the next 100 years of research.
Keywords
SENSORY GENERALIZATION, EMOTIONAL-REACTIONS, SEDUCTIVE ALLURE, EXTINCTION, RESPONSES, VALIDITY, DISINHIBITION, PSYCHOLOGY, DISORDERS, ANXIETY

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MLA
Vervliet, Bram, and Yannick Boddez. “Memories of 100 Years of Human Fear Conditioning Research and Expectations for Its Future.” BEHAVIOUR RESEARCH AND THERAPY, vol. 135, 2020, doi:10.1016/j.brat.2020.103732.
APA
Vervliet, B., & Boddez, Y. (2020). Memories of 100 years of human fear conditioning research and expectations for its future. BEHAVIOUR RESEARCH AND THERAPY. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2020.103732
Chicago author-date
Vervliet, Bram, and Yannick Boddez. 2020. “Memories of 100 Years of Human Fear Conditioning Research and Expectations for Its Future.” BEHAVIOUR RESEARCH AND THERAPY. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2020.103732.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Vervliet, Bram, and Yannick Boddez. 2020. “Memories of 100 Years of Human Fear Conditioning Research and Expectations for Its Future.” BEHAVIOUR RESEARCH AND THERAPY. doi:10.1016/j.brat.2020.103732.
Vancouver
1.
Vervliet B, Boddez Y. Memories of 100 years of human fear conditioning research and expectations for its future. Vol. 135, BEHAVIOUR RESEARCH AND THERAPY. 2020.
IEEE
[1]
B. Vervliet and Y. Boddez, “Memories of 100 years of human fear conditioning research and expectations for its future,” BEHAVIOUR RESEARCH AND THERAPY, vol. 135. 2020.
@misc{8695723,
  abstract     = {This special issue celebrates the 100th anniversary of the Little Albert study, published in February 1920, which marked the birth of human fear conditioning research. The collection of papers in this special issue provides a snapshot of the thriving state of this field today. In this Editorial, we first trace the historical roots of the field and then provide a conceptual analysis of the many ways in which human fear conditioning is currently used in theory and treatment development, with special reference to the contributions in this special issue. Ivan P. Pavlov allegedly claimed that "If you want new ideas, read old books". We could not agree more; it is our conviction that tracing the roots of our field illuminates current trends and will contribute to shaping new directions for the next 100 years of research.},
  articleno    = {103732},
  author       = {Vervliet, Bram and Boddez, Yannick},
  issn         = {0005-7967},
  keywords     = {SENSORY GENERALIZATION,EMOTIONAL-REACTIONS,SEDUCTIVE ALLURE,EXTINCTION,RESPONSES,VALIDITY,DISINHIBITION,PSYCHOLOGY,DISORDERS,ANXIETY},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {9},
  series       = {BEHAVIOUR RESEARCH AND THERAPY},
  title        = {Memories of 100 years of human fear conditioning research and expectations for its future},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.brat.2020.103732},
  volume       = {135},
  year         = {2020},
}

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